1,105,578 Community Members

Why is SATA faster than PATA?

Member Avatar
mahela007
Posting Whiz in Training
214 posts since Feb 2009
Reputation Points: 6 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 2 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 0 [?]
 
0
 

I was just reading about the different types of cables used to connect components of computers. When it comes to serial ports and parallel ports, parallel ports are faster because they send several bits of data simultaneously. Therefore, it should follow that parallel ATA is faster than Serial ATA. However, that's not the case. Why is this?

Member Avatar
jbennet
Moderator
17,127 posts since Apr 2005
Reputation Points: 1,618 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 736 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 38 [?]
Team Colleague
Featured
 
1
 

Its more extensible. Most of the wires in an old style ATA connector dont actually help transmit data, they are to stop interference (they actualy doubled the number of wires to 80 by adding more grounds). SATA however, has a higher cieling for this so just uses two pairs of wires for a total of 4 (with 3 grounds). This means its got a reduced cost and is easier to route as its smaller and allows for 3-6gb speeds under the current commn SATA specs. SATA also uses twisted pairs and differential signalling (sending the inverse of each signal to compliment eachother and reduce interference in much the same way as noise cancelling headphones do) which reduce interference and keep data rates up.

SCSI is technically faster, but its more expensive to implement due to its architechture.

Member Avatar
mahela007
Posting Whiz in Training
214 posts since Feb 2009
Reputation Points: 6 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 2 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 0 [?]
 
0
 

Isn't SCSI deprecated?

Member Avatar
zortec
Junior Poster
144 posts since Nov 2009
Reputation Points: 11 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 17 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 0 [?]
 
0
 

No, it is not deprecated yet but it will be soon now that SATA-2 has taken over.

Member Avatar
jbennet
Moderator
17,127 posts since Apr 2005
Reputation Points: 1,618 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 736 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 38 [?]
Team Colleague
Featured
 
0
 

No, it is not deprecated yet but it will be soon now that SATA-2 has taken over.

No, it will be superceded by SAS if anything.

Member Avatar
nileshgr
Junior Poster
161 posts since Aug 2009
Reputation Points: 1 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 23 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 0 [?]
 
0
 

Its more extensible. Most of the wires in an old style ATA connector dont actually help transmit data, they are to stop interference (they actualy doubled the number of wires to 80 by adding more grounds). SATA however, has a higher cieling for this so just uses two pairs of wires for a total of 4 (with 3 grounds). This means its got a reduced cost and is easier to route as its smaller and allows for 3-6gb speeds under the current commn SATA specs. SATA also uses twisted pairs and differential signalling (sending the inverse of each signal to compliment eachother and reduce interference in much the same way as noise cancelling headphones do) which reduce interference and keep data rates up.

SCSI is technically faster, but its more expensive to implement due to its architechture.

Thanks for this great info.

Member Avatar
mahela007
Posting Whiz in Training
214 posts since Feb 2009
Reputation Points: 6 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 2 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 0 [?]
 
0
 

yes.. Thanks for the gread info but I don't think you answered my original question.
Why is SATA faster? (Every bit has to be sent one behind the other)

Member Avatar
jbennet
Moderator
17,127 posts since Apr 2005
Reputation Points: 1,618 [?]
Q&As Helped to Solve: 736 [?]
Skill Endorsements: 38 [?]
Team Colleague
Featured
 
2
 

yes.. Thanks for the gread info but I don't think you answered my original question.
Why is SATA faster? (Every bit has to be sent one behind the other)

Because there is less electrical interference when you send things in serial fast in one direction at a time over a lower set of wires than when you send things in parallel over more wires (as in the case with PATA). PATA should in theory be faster but it isn't due to this limitation.

Its just like with network cables. To achieve gigabit speeds the cables have much more shielding to prevent crosstalk (which reduces bandwidth)

Question Answered as of 4 Years Ago by jbennet, nileshgr and zortec
You
This question has already been solved: Start a new discussion instead
Post:
Start New Discussion
Tags Related to this Article