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Problem calculating days between 2 dates

 
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>>difftime()

I see absolutely no value in that function because all it does is subtract the two parameter values and return the result as a double. When time_t is an (unsigned)integer then the double return value is just plain inconvenient because it would have to be typecast back to time_t. So the program might as well just subtract the two time_t objects and be done with it.

Isn't that somewhat analogous to how the Y2K issue came about -- that rather than doing it the "right" way, the "easy" way was chosen?

 
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>>that rather than doing it the "right" way, the "easy" way was chosen?

You consider calling a function just to subtract two numbers is the "right way":icon_eek: What a waste of cpu time.

 
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>>that rather than doing it the "right" way, the "easy" way was chosen?

You consider calling a function just to subtract two numbers is the "right way":icon_eek: What a waste of cpu time.

You seem to consider that a time_t is a measure of seconds. This is not necessarily true. Is writing potentially buggy code a better use of CPU time?

 
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time_t is only guarenteed to be an integral type on POSIX systems.

 
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Time type

Type capable of representing times and support arithmetical operations.

This type is returned by the time function and is used as parameter by some other functions of the <ctime> header.

It is almost universally expected to be an integral value representing the number of seconds elapsed since 00:00 hours, Jan 1, 1970 UTC. This is due to historical reasons, since it corresponds to a unix timestamp, but is widely implemented in C libraries across all platforms.

http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/ctime/time_t/

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