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Got Mono? Visual Studio Does

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(khess)
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Today, Tuesday November 10, 2009, Novell announces a Visual Studio plugin that allows support for non-Microsoft operating systems that use .NET code development on a platform known as Mono via a new product called Mono Tools for Visual Studio 1.0. This is not a cost free toolset. In fact, it's really quite pricey--starting at $99 for the Professional (Individual) version. Of course, compared to the exorbitant price of Visual Studio, that's a mere pittance.

If you can afford Mono Tools, it's a powerful addition to your Visual Studio environment. Using Mono Tools, you can create and test your .NET applications directly on Linux--just as you would when using a Windows host. You can also build installable .NET packages for Linux and even bundle them with Linux appliances* for easy distribution.

The downside is that, it seems, you must be sold on the SUSE Linux distribution. From Visual Studio, you create your applications as SUSE rpm packages. I think that the tools should be distribution agnostic to appeal to a wider audience but perhaps that is a hangup that only I have. You should be able to select which type of package you want to use for your application and not live with the SUSE-only limitation.

Limitations (and pricing) aside, I think that Mono Tools for Visual Studio is an excellent set of tools for your Visual Studio development efforts.

What do you think? Do you think the SUSE-only limitation is too great for widespread adoption or do you think it's OK?

* Appliances are small, single task virtual machines.

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jbennet
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t seems, you must be sold on the SUSE Linux distribution. From Visual Studio, you create your applications as SUSE rpm packages. I think that the tools should be distribution agnostic to appeal to a wider audience

You could turn them into DPkg .deb packages with Alien for example.

And why pay? Cant you just use mono with visual studio anyway? I mean, it does support other compilers... I use Visual studio for C++ using the GNU Tools (MinGW/MinSys & CygWin)

And there is always the free SharpDevelop mono IDE which is basically Visual Studio anyway.

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khess
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Maybe the "official" Mono Tools goes to 11. Surely Miguel de Icaza knows about the free ones. He is the main guy for this toolset.

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