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What is server and client side code?

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djbsabkcb
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What is server and client side code?

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Paladine
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Client Side: This is code/routines that are not processed at all by the server. Code is written in scripts (javascript usually) - plain text commands that instruct the client to do something. Generally used for performing dynamic effects, such as image rollovers, or displaying message boxes, or even validation of data entered into a form (i.e. email address is in the format of an email address ... contains the @ symbol).

Server Side This is code/routines executed only on the server. Code can be written in scripts as well (vbscript usually), but in the case of ASP.Net this is the compiled lanuages like C# / VB.Net. Used for processing content and returning data.

i.e.
You call up a webpage and a message box appears saying Welcome to "my site". This is client side. It did not require any request from the server to have that message box appear. That code was run on your computer/browser. But the page you requested displays a list of movies playing in your town. That list was populated/retrieved through a call to the Database (located at the City movie repository...or whatever) i.e. the server to retrieve that data for your town.

Hope that helps.
:cool:

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Dani
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Server side is code executed by the web server. Client side is code executed by the web browser of the person viewing the site. JavaScript and HTML are examples of client-side markup.

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Letscode
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Open your ASP.NET Project,
You'll have two mode,
1.HTML
2.Design

a.Click the HTML,
You'll see HTML and Javascript code.You can code the client side codes there.Its executed on the Client browser.

b.Now come back to Design View and double click design window,Now you be in Code behind(Webform1.aspx.vb),this is server side code.

Now execute your project,Hit F5 and a Internet explorer will be loaded,right click on the Internet Explorer and choose VIEW SOURCE.

You can see how similar your HTML code in you notepad looks when you compare it with HTML code in step a.

I thought I'll give you a practical explanation which will help you understand more.

Hope it helps

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tgreer
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Letscode: that isn't quite right. The "HTML" view in the VS.NET IDE isn't really HTML. It's ASP.NET code, or "aspx" code. Here you'll find the declaratives used by ASP.NET, along with the code-behind, to generate HTML. In other words, this isn't client-side code. What you see is still processed by the server.

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Letscode
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The HTML View was rather misleading when people say client script is written in Javacript and HTML.

YES you are right tgeer.The HTML view present in VS is NOT client side scripting.

My apologies for typing something wrong,Thats not my intension.

The HTML view has an HTML format BUT its not exactly the client side code.

ASP.NET generates the client side code for that current project. .

ASP.Net also does some fancy stuff like adding an hidden form field to a WebForm, called "__VIEWSTATE" to maintain state.

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djbsabkcb
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Thanks for the responses. I have a better understanding of the differences between the two. :cheesy:

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vprak2020
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thanks.. now iam very clear about it..

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