0

I want to focus a lot on developing new features for DaniWeb, and getting us back to our former glory. However, a lot of doing that requires the community's investment and involvement in Dazah.

Who out here in Internet land has any interest in building a Dazah app? If no, what are the main hesitations? What could I be doing to pique your interest?

3
Contributors
11
Replies
103
Views
6 Days
Discussion Span
Last Post by JamesCherrill
Featured Replies
  • 1
    Dani 1,665   3 Days Ago

    > Yes yes yes! Here's what it comes down to. Forums are old hat. Google doesn't like them. The ad industry has morphed such that publishers don't make much money from ads anymore. Twenty years ago, all the top generating websites were online publishers: Yahoo!, MSN, CNET, etc. Nowadays, they're … Read More

  • I never saw DW as just another vanity self-publishing social media timewaste. Real people with real problems came seeking answers and real people with real expertise spent real time answering them. You say that's "old hat". I disagree. There are just as many people struggling with IT courses as there … Read More

  • 1
    pty 588   3 Days Ago

    > to provide matchmaking between users Is there value in that? I know there is value in informed matchmaking but you need a high quality pool of users and companies. Can DW's userbase (which if I'm not mistaken is Dazah's too) support this kind of use in the real world? … Read More

0

I want to focus a lot on developing new features for DaniWeb

Yes yes yes!

any interest in building a Dazah app? If no, what are the main hesitations? What could I be doing to pique your interest?

Social media / person to person communications... everybody has already done it all to death. Entrenched competition has mind share and vast marketing budgets. Time to move on.

0

I'm not so sure I agree that there is no room for improvement with any social media applications currently out there. There's a lot you can do with Dazah that no one else in the industry is even considering.

So there are two ways to leverage the Dazah API:

  1. You have your own pre-existing community, such as a meetup group, or you want to build your own online community from scratch. You can use the Dazah API to build a chat-based app or a matchmaking app (such as a dating app for nerds).
  2. You want to write an app for existing Dazah / DaniWeb users, or an app that lets people search for or chat with existing Dazah / DaniWeb users.

An app that I was planning on doing myself, but never got around to do, is a Pastebin-like app for DaniWeb members. (So it would fall into the second category above). Basically the way it would work is users would log in with their Dazah credentials. Upon doing so, the API will have access to their complete DaniWeb member profiles, as well as who they chat with on DaniWeb, their favorite programming languages, etc. They could then post code snippets that, utilizing the Dazah chat functionality, could be viewed and edited in real time by multiple users. So essentially it would function like remote pair programming, but there would be a constant log of all code changes. The entire thing would be handled in Dazah’s servers. Because the API would give you who they chat with on DaniWeb, there could be an invite button where they could invite their DaniWeb friends into the live code snippet. Thoughts??

Anyways, that's just one of many ideas or directions you could take Dazah in.

Another place where I see a huge use case is when it comes to matchmaking, of course. We are the only platform that connects people by evaulating behaviors. No existing dating apps or professional networking apps that are on the market currently do anything like that.

We are also the only platform that lets people tap into the networking groups they're a member of in order to search for users based on specific criteria. You cannot search LinkedIn Groups, Facebook groups, or Meetup.com groups by any criteria other than some simple filters such as name or school. Not even by skill or interest! So that's a huge use case as well.

1

Yes yes yes!

Here's what it comes down to. Forums are old hat. Google doesn't like them. The ad industry has morphed such that publishers don't make much money from ads anymore. Twenty years ago, all the top generating websites were online publishers: Yahoo!, MSN, CNET, etc. Nowadays, they're all close to bankrupt. And you don't hear about forums like you did 5-10 years ago.

There are two types of businesses that make money online nowadays: SaaS platforms (software-as-a-service) where you pay to use their online service or platform, and social media platforms that collect data about their users and have their own proprietary ad platforms to sell targeted ads to these users (Facebook and Google).

Dazah integrates with DaniWeb, offers a robust SaaS platform, and collects and utilizes user behavior in a way never before done: to provide matchmaking between users. I'm trying to save DaniWeb with Dazah. But I need it to gain enough traction and revenue to justify putting effort into working on it.

0

Why say "yes yes yes!" to putting resources into developing new features for DaniWeb, but at the same time say there is no room for improvement in social media, everyone has already done it to death, and it's time to move on. DaniWeb is a social media platform aimed at techies, is it not? And Dazah is that same platform, only in the form of an API.

3

I never saw DW as just another vanity self-publishing social media timewaste. Real people with real problems came seeking answers and real people with real expertise spent real time answering them. You say that's "old hat". I disagree. There are just as many people struggling with IT courses as there always were. I can't see a single reason why the demand should have declined.
OK, so the problem is Google. So isn't the response 100% effort in SEO?
If it turns out that we can get better exposure by adding some particular feature (language-specific forums anyone?), and that Dazah API is best way to do it, then OK. Otherwize it just sounds like a solution seeking a problem.
If the real problem is that it's hard to make enough profit from a service like DW then it's time for some existential soul-searching.

<personal note> Dani: I seem to be your main, even only, critic on this. It's not personal. For the record I'm a huge fan of you and what you have done. I'm arguing a side that I believe needs to be argued, but only because I really want to see DW continue. I have no doubt that you are the solution, not the problem. JC </personal note>

Edited by JamesCherrill

1

to provide matchmaking between users

Is there value in that?

I know there is value in informed matchmaking but you need a high quality pool of users and companies. Can DW's userbase (which if I'm not mistaken is Dazah's too) support this kind of use in the real world?

I know DW has a lot of members but seemingly only a tiny handful of them are active, many are novices and I don't see any companies being represented.

In this arena you'll be up against LinkedIn, Xing, Salesforce; plus the countless companies that build on their APIs. They all have massive databases full of high quality customer and client record and sell b2b services on top.

Tldr; you might have the expertise but you need the data to back it up.

0

I can't see a single reason why the demand should have declined.
OK, so the problem is Google. So isn't the response 100% effort in SEO?

The online ecosystem has changed. Search engines don't send traffic to forums anymore ... especially any tech forums. It's not like other forums started outranking us and we can just work on our SEO. All search engines don't like forums nowadays, so getting significant traffic from SEO for a forum-based site is just not possible anymore. Secondly, online publishers cannot earn revenue from advertising by working with ad networks and ad agencies anymore. Also, direct advertisers don't work directly with publishers anymore. So forums, even if they did get traffic, just aren't able to make enough money to cover their costs.

Whether you personally believe that forums are not "old hat" or whether you personally still see value in forums is not up for debate. I, as well, personally see value in forums, and value in DaniWeb. However, the current online ecosystem has changed in such a way such that forums simply are not profitable anymore. Adding additional features to the forum, without massively overhauling the revenue model, will not fix the problem. The solution I'm looking to Dazah for is a way of monetizing what I've built with DaniWeb. If DaniWeb continues to not bring in any money, I can't just keep pouring time and effort into it.

I know DW has a lot of members but seemingly only a tiny handful of them are active, many are novices and I don't see any companies being represented.

We are not trying to match users with companies. We are trying to match users with users.

  • People who work from home, who are missing out on the social aspects of working in an office environment, looking to meet other locals who work in their industry
  • People who are looking to find mentors
  • People who work in sales or business development positions who are looking to meet potential clients one-on-one
  • Any of the people I typically encounter attending and hosting tech meetups and business networking events

In this arena you'll be up against LinkedIn, Xing, Salesforce; plus the countless companies that build on their APIs. They all have massive databases full of high quality customer and client record and sell b2b services on top.

LinkedIn does not have a public-facing API. The only API they offer is for vetted high-profile companies and HR firms who want to pay to search their database of resumes. Salesforce, of course, does not provide any type of database of users for APIs to tap into either. They are just robust database software. I'm not familiar with Xing.

0

LinkedIn has an extensive API. Of course they restrict aspects of it because they don't want people competing against them, and Salesforce is Siloed so wouldn't really be suitable for the "professional dating" thing. Xing is the LinkedIn of the German speaking world.

Any of the people I typically encounter attending and hosting tech meetups and business networking events

Many of them on Daniweb? Any?

People who are looking to find mentors

Please don't pair me with Davy

People who work from home, who are missing out on the social aspects of working in an office environment, looking to meet other locals who work in their industry

Ok, this is a potential niche, I guess

People who work in sales or business development positions who are looking to meet potential clients one-on-one

I don't get this. Without pairing at the company level how could you know if someone is a potential client? Or are you talking about b2c pairings?

0

LinkedIn has an extensive API. Of course they restrict aspects of it because they don't want people competing against them, and Salesforce is Siloed so wouldn't really be suitable for the "professional dating" thing.

I'm very, very, very familiar with LinkedIn's API. I've written against it many times. As you say, they don't offer any way to tap into their users from a social perspective. The point I was trying to make is that our APIs aren't really in competition with each other in any way. Not Facebook's, either.

I don't get this. Without pairing at the company level how could you know if someone is a potential client? Or are you talking about b2c pairings?

I attend sooooo many networking events where you go into a room full of a few hundred people. You go up to the first person and you say, "Hi, so, what do you do?" and you make small talk for a few minutes, swap business cards, and see if there's a potential fit for working together. Then you move onto the next person. Three hours later, you wasted two and a half hours making small talk with people that aren't a good fit for your business, and you left with 5 business cards. A lot of these events attempt to reduce the pain points by color coding name tags so that you can more easily find the people who fit into your business plan, providing lists in advance of the event of the elevator pitches of attendees so you can focus on who you want to meet once you get there, etc. There has to be a more efficient way.

0

I don't get this. Without pairing at the company level how could you know if someone is a potential client? Or are you talking about b2c pairings?

It's been my experience that it's all about who you know. I run a tech forum and I don't want to be matched with Dell. But a specific person who works for Dell Community Outreach, or a person who knows someone who can potentially help make something happen ... those are the connections that can turn into potential partnerships.

In my 15 years of selling advertising inventory to agencies, I work with specific sales reps and follow them as they change positions between companies. A rep I develop a relationshp with when they work at Univeral McCann is going to take their little black book with them when they move to Ogilvy. It's my experience that in most sales-based positions, people take their client list with them when they switch jobs. In fact, many times companies attempt to steal employees from each other because it's the cheapest way of acquiring a lucrative customer.

Either way, my point is that it should all be about the people and relationships between people. The benefits of networking come from relationships with people. Not relationships with entities.

Edited by Dani

0

Search engines don't send traffic to forums anymore ... especially any tech forums. It's not like other forums started outranking us and we can just work on our SEO.

I'm calling bullshit on that.

I just tried the kind of search a Java learner is likely to make when seeking help:
"java problem null pointer"

In the first 10 pages of results maybe 1/4 were some kind of forum or community discussion site, starting with hit number 2 None of them was DaniWeb.

Edited by JamesCherrill

Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.