I have been trying to convince some friends that early computer geeks made music by banging the printer - well, someone finally collected some of the 'real' computer music. This is at least as geeky as that ascii movie someone posted earlier that had a Rammstien soundtrack.

While researching some ideas for one of my posts I ran across this screensaver and immediately dl-ed and installed it - then bought him a pint. Check this out!.

While researching some ideas for one of my posts I ran across this screensaver and immediately dl-ed and installed it - then bought him a pint. Check this out!.

I like that screensaver....
:):):)

This guy is gonna be drunk by the end of a DANIWEB day!!

Hi there,
Thanks for the post.
Good luck with your music endeavors.

This guy is gonna be drunk by the end of a DANIWEB day!!

I can only hope so.

Here is where geek meets beauty - what could be more geek than a swan made of silver and glass that does nothing but preen and catch a fish

that Screeny sure as hell is a blaster,pitty cant get it as a desktop

It would drive me to distracton if I had that clock as a desktop but maybe he could be convinced to make it a gadget??

Here is some GreenScreen fun from the Naive New Beaters.

I have been trying to convince some friends that early computer geeks made music by banging the printer - well, someone finally collected some of the 'real' computer music. This is at least as geeky as that ascii movie someone posted earlier that had a Rammstien soundtrack.

I think I have them beat. One of the jobs I was given was to write assembly code, and
that code's sole purpose in life was to try to draw the maximum current through the
microprocessor it was being run on. This microprocessor sat on a module whose solid
state power regulator was not exactly the best choice for the amount of current the
processor could draw resulting in a solid tone that could actually be heard. By modifying
the "power" code, I was able to make the regulator "sing"...(Yes, they eventually changed
components). One can "bang" a hard drive as well, although I don't recommend running
the actual code for very long.

Wow! you are soooo geeky - any chance of a recording? - I didn't think so, sigh!

Only vaguely related - when I first moved to Seattle, the trolley lines were so old that you could hear the trolley coming because the lines would begin to 'sing' - waiting for a bus at 2am on Queen Anne hill and hearing the singing would get downright creepy (consider the trolley line as a string like on a violin and the trolley shoes are the bow).

Well, I found this map site and though this might be a good place to put a link.

You're not going to believe this page.Pretty fun, although the website you choose drastically affects the challenge- graphics become "buildings" you cannot enter, while text is just background you can walk over. Metafilter, being graphics-deprived, is large but simple; Google, being small and minimal, is even easier. Try a site with a mix of large and small graphics- Yahoo wasn't too bad, any other suggestions?

Controls: The Last Guy follows your cursor. If you hold down the left mouse button, he runs (depleting stamina). Z and X (or the mouse wheel) zoom, C gathers all the people you have into a ball (good if your conga line's gotten out of hand). Most importantly, Space shows you where people are, but hides zombies- use judiciously!

The power-ups give you Energy (half your stamina back) and High Energy (all your stamina back). If you have more than 100 people in your line, your max stamina increases; it does so again if you have more than 200 people.

I just found this site - you have to go here to create an account for yourself. It looks like the front page tracks most recent acticity.
Do you want to plot the curse of your life?
Do you think 'they' have a more interesting life?
Look no further.

I like the idea of the openid project and I want to see how long Mycro can keep my attention.