0

Is it true that a Heparin overdose in a human would cause symptoms easily mistaken for a stroke? What are the signs that show an overdose of Heparin? I asked my high school Anatomy & Physiology teacher, but he had no clue ... Hellooooo!?!?! He's my teacher... he has the knowledge of what is and what is not safe to the human body. Without being doubtful.... he doesn't even know where he lives!!!!!, LMAO, so that explains why he wouln't know about the human body. But I guess, he's a great teacher; the only bad thing is that he doesn't know what to answer when he is asked a question. Hopefully you guys can help me... not any matter of real knowledge just curiosity ;)

3
Contributors
6
Replies
7
Views
12 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by DJG
0

Goodness, what an odd question! Okay, let's start with the simple answer first: bleeding is the chief sign of heparin overdose, i.e. nosebleeds, blood in urine, tarry stools. Easy bruising is often a precedent to the forementioned.


Is it true that a Heparin overdose in a human would cause symptoms easily mistaken for a stroke?

Put simply, it's conceivable that a patient on heparin may develop "white clot syndrome," which can lead to stroke among other things. Therefore, heparin is prescribed when warranted and the patient is monitored closely, i.e. pro-time testing.

Heparin, as well as other anticoagulants are beneficial and lifesaving. To be honest, in all the years I worked in the medical field, I did not encounter a case of heparin overdose, mainly because my patients were monitored.

I'm not sure if I answered your question?

0

Pretty much any medication when used incorrectly can cause serious problems.

People have died from vitamin C for example, thought the dose needed there is so extreme only terminal health nuts would ever be at risk :)

0

You know the most dangerous substance known to man?
It's Oxygen, without which we couldn't live.
But it's also extremely corrosive, a required component to maintain any fire, and a deadly poison to many lifeforms (and in fact the increase in oxygen content in the atmosphere due to green plants caused the wholesale extinction of many lifeforms back in the old days. Were Greenpeace to have been in existence at the time they'd have campaigned for the destruction of green plants and an international pact to reduce atmospheric oxygen levels).

0

Goodness, what an odd question! Okay, let's start with the simple answer first: bleeding is the chief sign of heparin overdose, i.e. nosebleeds, blood in urine, tarry stools. Easy bruising is often a precedent to the forementioned.

Put simply, it's conceivable that a patient on heparin may develop "white clot syndrome," which can lead to stroke among other things. Therefore, heparin is prescribed when warranted and the patient is monitored closely, i.e. pro-time testing.

Heparin, as well as other anticoagulants are beneficial and lifesaving. To be honest, in all the years I worked in the medical field, I did not encounter a case of heparin overdose, mainly because my patients were monitored.

I'm not sure if I answered your question?

Oh you have! My grandfather was feeling a bit depressed and is taking Heparin for some heart problems ... I think?... He likes talking to me and in his conversation, he added that if he would commit suicide he would do it with Heparin and no one would ever know ... he said, "If I overdose, no one would ever know because it would be mistaken by a heart stroke." I don't know where he got that from, but I told him that there was a probability that it would show signs of an overdose; he just kept quiet. I was really shocked and I began giving him his medication every day, being scared he would commit suicide.
Thanks, you sound like a really smart person... and it is true that an overdose of any kind can kill. Thank you, now I will be more aware on what my grandfather is taking :)
And yeah, it was an odd Q', but it was all for a good reason... right? :)

0

Yes, it was definitely for a good reason. :)

It's not unusual for a person with a heart problem to feel depressed, whether the problem be chronic or relatively new. It's great that you're so supportive of your grandfather.

Again, anticoagulants are beneficial and lifesaving...what they do is help to prevent future problems. Just take care that your grandfather is monitored because sometimes the dosage may need to be adjusted - a simple blood test which can be performed right in the doctor's office will keep him on track.

Good thoughts being sent your way and I'm glad I was able to help. :)

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
Have something to contribute to this discussion? Please be thoughtful, detailed and courteous, and be sure to adhere to our posting rules.