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I have done some calculations and found that us humans have been counting leap years wrong in the past whatever years. It is not the year 2010 but instead 2509. The proof - check out the below php script which should display 2009 using timestamp ratios but instead displays a time in the future.

<?php
$time=mktime(0,0,0,1,1,2020);
$ratio=1980/40;
$time=$ratio*$time;
$year=floor($time/(360.25*24*60*60));
echo $year;
?>

So what are your opinions on this. I believe history is wrong and somebody has forgotten to add those leap years. Enjoy...;)

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7 Years
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Last Post by vegaseat
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  • 1
    jonsca 1,059   7 Years Ago

    [icode] $year=floor($time/([B][I][U]360.25[/U][/I][/B]*24*60*60));[/icode] If you're going to be Captain Smartguy, you ought to have your numbers correct at the very least. Read More

  • 3
    jonsca 1,059   7 Years Ago

    Last I checked on the calendar a year had 365 days (+0.25 fudge factor) Read More

  • 1
    jonsca 1,059   7 Years Ago

    I was being facetious more than anything about the 0.25, I know it's important. However, with your calculations you were losing 5 days per year. Read More

  • 1

    The calendar is an arbitrary imposition of order onto civilizations blundering around the sun. In general, rather than AD and BC - the years are numbered Common Era/Before Common Era (it is currently 2009 CE soon to be 2010). There are many cultures that do not accept the birth of … Read More

1

And while you are disproving pi, one of maths most loved numbers, and the calendar, why don't you try convince us that we breath carbon dioxide and expel sulfur?

-1

No. Its 2010, build a bridge, get over it.

Still 2009 for another 2 hours 15 minutes here but how did they determine the year in the first place. Surely at some point somebody forgot what the date and made a guess. How do we know for sure that everybody has been counting it correctly. What about leap years and all of that which scientists are complaining about saying we should have a leap minute...

0

Have you ever thought of the current year to be 400,002,509 because when you think about it there has been organisms on our planet for over 400 million years so wouldn't you logically count from when time started?

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No its not 2509, after calculation i got its 2830, i dont know what is missing in my calculation but i am really surprised and i want from you to check it again.

0

Looks like that mktime function is set to the local timezone. I think I have made the appropriate fixes and we are not that far in the past where the year is 2037.

<?php
$time=mktime(0,0,0,1,1,2020)-mktime(0,0,0,1,1,1980);
$ratio=2010/40;
$time=$ratio*$time;
$year=floor($time/(360.25*24*60*60));
echo $year;
?>

With this script the subtraction should compensate for the timezone difference and I have fixed a bug on line 3.

Edited by cwarn23: n/a

1

$year=floor($time/([B][I][U]360.25[/U][/I][/B]*24*60*60)); If you're going to be Captain Smartguy, you ought to have your numbers correct at the very least.

Edited by jonsca: n/a

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$year=floor($time/([B][I][U]360.25[/U][/I][/B]*24*60*60)); If you're going to be Captain Smartguy, you ought to have your numbers correct at the very least.

The reason why I had 360.25 is because every 4 years don't we get an extra day? So that would mean the average year would have 360.25 days or in your opinion how many days are there in the average year factoring in leap years?

0

(+0.25 fudge factor)

Well you need to add that factor otherwise we would will loose 1 day every 4 years. So 1 leap day divided by 4 years = 0.25 days. Then you add that to the total days in the year and you will get a more accurate figure leap year inclusive...

1

I was being facetious more than anything about the 0.25, I know it's important. However, with your calculations you were losing 5 days per year.

Votes + Comments
Thanks for pointing out the error...
0

I was being facetious more than anything about the 0.25, I know it's important. However, with your calculations you were losing 5 days per year.

Thanks for pointing that out. I adjusted the formula to the following and it yields 2010.

<?php
$time=mktime(0,0,0,1,1,2020)-mktime(0,0,0,1,1,1980);
$ratio=2010/40;
$time=$ratio*$time;
$year=floor($time/(365.25*24*60*60));
echo $year;
?>

At last proof that the current year is 2010. Also who here no longer uses the traditional AD system. I myself prefer not to use the AD system and instead use the unix timestamp system for everything including remembering events and dates.

Edited by cwarn23: php syntax

0

365.25 is not accurate though. We have a leap year every 4 years, except where that year is evenly divisible by 100. Overriding the exception is if the year is evently divisible by 400 then it is a leap year.

if (
    (((year mod 4) = 0) && ((year mod 100) != 0))
    ||
    ((year mod 400) = 0)
  )
{
 //leap year...
}

I think it works out to be ~365.2422

Edited by sknake: pseudo code wouldnt compile, missing a )

0

Earth orbits the Sun at an average distance of about 150 million kilometers every 365.2564 mean solar days. Mean days they are at times!

0

Earth orbits the Sun at an average distance of about 150 million kilometers every 365.2564 mean solar days. Mean days they are at times!

If it is true that there is 365.2564 days in a year then that means we in about November 2009. Does anybody believe this?

1

The calendar is an arbitrary imposition of order onto civilizations blundering around the sun.

In general, rather than AD and BC - the years are numbered Common Era/Before Common Era (it is currently 2009 CE soon to be 2010). There are many cultures that do not accept the birth of Christ as a valid starting point but realize the we need a common calendar hence Common Era.

(Jews, Hindus, historian etc come to mind).

0

The calendar is an arbitrary imposition of order onto civilizations blundering around the sun.

In general, rather than AD and BC - the years are numbered Common Era/Before Common Era (it is currently 2009 CE soon to be 2010). There are many cultures that do not accept the birth of Christ as a valid starting point but realize the we need a common calendar hence Common Era.

(Jews, Hindus, historian etc come to mind).

It's a know fact that Jesus was not born on 1 BC. Most likely he was born some 4-6 years before that. It's also a known fact that he was not born on December 25th. That date was just chosen by the Pope to celebrate His birth, most likely because it coincided with existing fall/winter celebrations.

To paraphrase William Shakespeare -- BC by any other name is still BC.

Interesting is how Chinese number the years

Although the Chinese calendar traditionally does not use continuously numbered years, outside China its years are often numbered from the reign of Huangdi. But at least three different years numbered 1 are now used by various scholars, making the year 2009 "Chinese Year" 4707, 4706, or 4646.[2]

Edited by Ancient Dragon: correct accepted date of Jesus's birth

0

It appears the Chinese new year is more accurate than the AD new year while using the AD numbering system. Amazing how smart the Chinese are.

0

It appears the Chinese new year is more accurate than the AD new year while using the AD numbering system. Amazing how smart the Chinese are.

Let me repeat myself - the calendar is an arbitrary numbering of the years so what you are saying is that the arbitrary Chinese new year is more accurate than the arbitrary AD yadda yadda yadda.

0

Let me repeat myself - the calendar is an arbitrary numbering of the years so what you are saying is that the arbitrary Chinese new year is more accurate than the arbitrary AD yadda yadda yadda.

Exactly while still using the 2009 instead of four thousand and something.

0

Hmm, a year is the time it takes for our planet to orbit the sun once. A day is the time the Earth rotates once. Neither of these times have a guaranty of staying constant.

Our Western counter of those years starts with a religious event witnessed by a bunch of shepherds tending their flocks.

I don't think we should worry about accuracy too much, as long as the people in power agree to the same count.

Edited by vegaseat: power

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