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"gauche"

In discussing use of boolean types, I found the following:

By the way, it is considered gauche to write a test such as
if ( married == true ) .... //Don't
Just use the simpler test
if ( married )

(my emphasis added)

"Big Java", 4th ed, Cay Horstman, pg 198

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Last Post by ddanbe
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Probably an error in translation :)

Nope. Translation is fine. It is gauche. And it's uber-gauche to use goto :icon_wink:

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>A word I wouldn't expect to see in a programming text
>"gauche"

Why not?

Probably because it is an extremely unusual word, it is not the best word to describe the situation, and most of the readers of any programming book would not have ever seen or heard the word before.

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>Probably because it is an extremely unusual word
I disagree. Perhaps it's becoming more and more unusual as the average level of education plummets, but I'm not surprised to see it in the wild.

>it is not the best word to describe the situation
It's accurate enough to fall under creative license for writing. I would have described that construct as unconventional and redundant, though.

>most of the readers of any programming book would
>not have ever seen or heard the word before

Most of the readers of any programming book should be capable of inferring the meaning and/or looking up unfamiliar words. If not, they probably shouldn't be reading a book on programming. ;)

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Just one nice French word (in the US it may be called Liberty word) translated as:
lacking social grace, sensitivity, or acuteness; awkward; crude; tactless.

Take your pick! I feel sorry for all the programmers that use if condition==true, as they are tactless and crude people lacking social grace! All of this because some ill educated person wrote another Java book.

Edited by bumsfeld: n/a

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I disagree. Perhaps it's becoming more and more unusual as the average level of education plummets, but I'm not surprised to see it in the wild.

It can be easily seen through common language and in literature that the word is uncommon. I agree with you, more or less, on the other points. They should have left it at "unconventional" though. I also hope they see this thread somehow, despite the unlikelihood, because it would be amusing to see such a random argument.

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It can be easily seen through common language and in literature that the word is uncommon.

Only in your limited scope of the world. There are words I know you've never heard in common use -- they just aren't used in your particular area.

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>There are words I know you've never heard in common
>use -- they just aren't used in your particular area.

Like "y'all"? Both y'all are yankees (according to profile), so y'all might not hear "y'all" in common use like I do. ;)

Heheh, y'all.

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Only in your limited scope of the world. There are words I know you've never heard in common use -- they just aren't used in your particular area.

Like gauche, which is not used frequently anywhere, and literature reflects common language more than anything. I challenge you to find in any writings or documents where the word gauche is used in any way that could be described as commonly.

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>There are words I know you've never heard in common
>use -- they just aren't used in your particular area.

Like "y'all"? Both y'all are yankees (according to profile), so y'all might not hear "y'all" in common use like I do. ;)

Heheh, y'all.

Actually, I do realize that ya'll is quite common, and I've heard it said many times up North, although I've been to a few Southern states. Gauche.. not so much.

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I totally understand. I was more kidding around than anything. Well ya can't get any more American than that. And that is certainly not gauche.

Edited by jonsca: n/a

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Like gauche, which is not used frequently anywhere, and literature reflects common language more than anything. I challenge you to find in any writings or documents where the word gauche is used in any way that could be described as commonly.

I must bow to your extremely well-read self. I for one don't have time to read all books, magazines and newspapers that [have been/are being] printed in the English-speaking world, so I'm sure I've missed quite a few.

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Who says that a book written by a programmer has to be written in a dull and boring manner? Let them throw in a fresh and mildly spicy word every now and then to stimulate the reader's palate.

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I must bow to your extremely well-read self. I for one don't have time to read all books, magazines and newspapers that [have been/are being] printed in the English-speaking world, so I'm sure I've missed quite a few.

I'm just saying; I'm not the one arguing with the obvious without backing it up. I never claimed to be a genius or anything like that, only challenged what I think is an outlandish statement.

Edited by BestJewSinceJC: n/a

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All y'all understand that the word 'gauche' is French for left, right? Like the Latin from which French (d)evolved, it is anti-left-handed - sinister is Latin for left.

Edited by GrimJack: droit is forward and adroit is right - listen closely to driving directions.

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In the whole "Is this word really used" debate no one brought up its use in Organic Chemistry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauche_effect). Scores of college sophomores are introduced to it and they don't even know how lucky they are.

@GrimJack, I always find it fun to pronounce adroit as English. It feels like I'm rebelling against that French class feeling. Now if only I can get that gow-chee pronunciation to catch on.

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Next you'll be saying they should have to wear different gloves in baseball.

Edited by apegram: n/a

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In the whole "Is this word really used" debate no one brought up its use in Organic Chemistry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauche_effect). Scores of college sophomores are introduced to it and they don't even know how lucky they are.

@GrimJack, I always find it fun to pronounce adroit as English. It feels like I'm rebelling against that French class feeling. Now if only I can get that gow-chee pronunciation to catch on.

Yeah, it is apparently also used in some programming language, which I saw the other day on google. Here it is:

http://practical-scheme.net/gauche/

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In the whole "Is this word really used" debate no one brought up its use in Organic Chemistry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gauche_effect). Scores of college sophomores are introduced to it and they don't even know how lucky they are.

@GrimJack, I always find it fun to pronounce adroit as English. It feels like I'm rebelling against that French class feeling. Now if only I can get that gow-chee pronunciation to catch on.

Don't you just love the French!? If you are clumsy and socially awkward, you are left but if you speak well and move gracefully, you are right. I don't think anyone who speak English/American pronounces 'adroit' properly (er, Frenchly); nor would anyone even understand what they meant if they did.

Too-shay is wrong it should be pronounced toosh - so you can keep up the rebellion.

Edited by GrimJack: touché is my reference word, of course

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Too-shay is wrong it should be pronounced toosh - so you can keep up the rebellion.

It's more fun to pronounce like "tushie." Oh my that's quite gow-chee of me.

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