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I'm torn, so im majoring in accounting and minoring (is that a word :-/ ) in math. Took intro to cs class (c++ programming) got an a-, the class was super easy, the minus was because of missed HW's. Decided to take second cs class (c++ programing), dropped it because it was harder than first class, teacher was terrible, and i had limited time to do programming

sooooooo

Computers are at best my third preferred career path. So am i wasting time registering for same c++ programming class that I dropped.

P.S. If it wasnt apparent i'm not a techie or anything of that sort (although I am computer savvy compared to most other people ) and as far as I'm concerned programming for hours at a time is one of the things one encounters in hell.

Edited by JetsFan: n/a

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Last Post by zekish
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What you major in is completely up to you, but don't rule it out simply because you coding isn't your cup of tea. There are numerous avenues you can take with a computer science degree such as market research, analyst, tester, etc.. Personally, coding my own "projects" for hours on end is what I do on my days off (I work as a PHP/MySQL programmer) and I wouldn't have it any other way, but to each his own!

Good luck with your decision!

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>> Computers are at best my third preferred career path.

>> as far as I'm concerned programming for hours at a time is one of the things one encounters in hell.


You've answered your own question. Why would you pick your third preferred career path instead of your first or second? Why would you pick a path that requires you to do something that one encounters in hell?

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Give that you quit something because it wasn't easy, then it probably doesn't matter what you choose.

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@RykeTech: thank you for the reply, unlike the other two it actually would help me make that decision
@vernon: Why do people need back up plans, and other options? HMMM let's see because sometimes choice 1 doesn't work out and choice 2 might not either.
@frogboy: Thank you for the totally useless post; i apologize that i omitted three words 'harder than I expected it to be' Happy?

Edited by JetsFan: n/a

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>> Why do people need back up plans, and other options? HMMM let's see because sometimes choice 1 doesn't work out and choice 2 might not either.

Sarcastic, aren't we? Did you want real advice or not? Re-read your post. Do you really hate programming or do you not? Getting a CS degree is going to require endless hours coding non-stop. You can go the marketing research/testing route after you graduate, but you're not going to graduate and be any good at it unless you put in the time. If you truly hate it, you're not going to be any good at it. Why be a masochist? Major in something you actually enjoy doing.

Edited by VernonDozier: n/a

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dropped it because it was harder than first class

is not entirely different from

'harder than I expected it to be'

neither is it a good reason.

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If you don't enjoy coding, don't waste everyone's time taking programming classes. There's nothing worse than taking a serious programming class with someone who doesn't want to be there, unless it's teaching that class. You will be a pure waste of space. Don't do it.

If you really want to do something that's as easy as you expect it to be, go into marketing or management or something. No brain required there, you make stupid amounts of money for someone who does nothing useful whatsoever, and you can wave around your one c++ course as evidence that you understand this stuff, and you could do the programmers' jobs if you wanted.

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Well whatever you study is up to you, but one thing that I've realized of late is the easiest thing to do is to do nothing, you could try it, but I love you so I'll tell, study what ever, but it's not in what you study, the course you study does not make you, you make the course you study.

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Think you missed the boat paps. He enrolled in the new year.

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A computer savvy accountant, that sounds like one of those over-bonused Wall street jobs!

I was going to point out that he could try to minor in CS because that could help him in the accounting field but then you reminded me of all those financial folks that wrote all those stupid investment and banking models that helped to put us in a recession. You are correct - he should avoid CS. It would be better to have a CS person dabble in accounting than the other way around.

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