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C++ was once the King of programming. It would crush any competitor!
But, now it seems that C++ is getting less popular. New programmers are rushing to easier to learn, higher level, programming languages (e.g. Java). And with Microsoft coming out with C# which is gaining popularity (even though it is an EXTREMELY high level programming language), what does it all mean for C/C++?

- WolfShield

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Last Post by Netcode
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    Narue 5,707   6 Years Ago

    [QUOTE]what does it all mean for C/C++?[/QUOTE] Nothing at all. C++ will continue chugging along in the areas that it's best suited. People will continue to claim that C++ is dead or dying, and they'll continue to be wrong for the foreseeable future. People will still come up with reasons … Read More

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    jbennet 1,618   6 Years Ago

    I know people still working on FORTRAN code..... languages dont just die as soon as the next new thing comes along, code represents a significant investment and if it aint broke, dont fix it. I like C++. Sure C# etc.... is nicer for RAD but its not as flexible... Read More

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    WaltP 2,905   6 Years Ago

    [QUOTE=jingda;1640206]C++ will not and should not die because I just started learning it...[/QUOTE] That's the most compelling reason why C++ cannot die. [B]Jingda[/B] just started using it! Read More

  • I think this about sums things up: Read More

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    WaltP 2,905   6 Years Ago

    [QUOTE=GrimJack;1644049]Yeah! I was going to mention the fact that COBOL is the worst language in the world and yet most internal software depends on it. It is one of those old, spaghetti-code languages that has about a billion person hours invested and limps along because -er- no one knows how … Read More

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To me, C++ is not dying, at least not for as long as I live. I have to admit, I have to use other (high-level) languages in order to fit in at work. Satisfaction is way higher when I finish up projects in C++, though. I see C++ as my base language, just the way I see Dutch as my base language because it's the language I learnt to speak in at home. With C++ I feel like having full control on what I develop, so it's a language i'll never abandon.

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what does it all mean for C/C++?

Nothing at all. C++ will continue chugging along in the areas that it's best suited. People will continue to claim that C++ is dead or dying, and they'll continue to be wrong for the foreseeable future. People will still come up with reasons why C++ should die, and they'll be largely ignored. People will continue to create languages that will be hailed as the "C++ killer", which will continue to find niches while failing to kill C++.

The reality is that languages with any reasonably large source base will never die. Case in point: COBOL. While you don't hear about COBOL because it's not sexy or fashionable, the source base is huge, and if you know COBOL, you can practically write your own paychecks to maintain it.

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I know people still working on FORTRAN code..... languages dont just die as soon as the next new thing comes along, code represents a significant investment and if it aint broke, dont fix it.

I like C++. Sure C# etc.... is nicer for RAD but its not as flexible...

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I believe every language has its own advantages over others. It's just choosing what kind of tool you're gonna use to make everything efficient. Sure you can still do things in other high languages (and much easier) but what about the performance?

On the other hand, I use Java as my primary language when it comes to software development. But when the client has a little budget and doesn't need fancy program, I'd just use VB or .Net to make everything faster.

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I use Java as my primary language when it comes to software development. But when the client has a little budget and doesn't need fancy program, I'd just use VB or .Net to make everything faster.

I'm curious. How does Java differ from say, C#, in your opinion? They're comparable in my experience, but your statement suggests that Java is somehow more powerful (ie. supports "fancy" programs) while .NET has better support for RAD.

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My 2-cents.... for me .NET is better than Java as you can mesh your new C# code in with the "glue" of Managed C++ so you can still work with your older code and do lower level things

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Yet again I find myself agreeing with you whole-heartedly, GJ!
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When a company like MIcrosoft leaves out a core feature like Intellisense, it seems more like attempted murder. #vs2010.

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And do not ignore the user base. The more users, the longer it takes to 'die.'

Anybody who does ignore those geeks^H^H^H^H^H users will always wonder "How come they still use [C++, Visual Basic 6, TECO, Assembler, FORTRAN, COBOL,<insert your fave here>] at that place ?"

Legacy code = job security.:cool:

To kill a language, one has to actively make machines that work against it.

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My 2-cents.... for me .NET is better than Java as you can mesh your new C# code in with the "glue" of Managed C++ so you can still work with your older code and do lower level things

Wow easy man, I know you're avid fan of .Net but be careful, respect other's language as like respecting other's religion's beliefs

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trololololol, "for me ..."
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I'm curious. How does Java differ from say, C#, in your opinion? They're comparable in my experience, but your statement suggests that Java is somehow more powerful (ie. supports "fancy" programs) while .NET has better support for RAD.

I'm not saying C# is better, infact what I've said, Every languages has its own weaknesses and special ability. They have different kinds of approaches in different kinds of situation. Different supports and different limitations. for example, java has lots of supports specially on android.

Just look at it on a much higher view. For example, PHP vs JSP - PHP has lots of issues when it comes to security and JSP is more secure. But what about the project? Is it funded well to build much sophisticated websites? Thus, PHP has lots of good frameworks. But we all know JSP is much powerful than PHP...

I hope what I'm saying is correct HAHAHA :))

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My 2-cents.... for me .NET is better than Java as you can mesh your new C# code in with the "glue" of Managed C++ so you can still work with your older code and do lower level things

My bad. Sorry mate, are you joking or...?

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If you have a website traffic like Facebook, Youtube or Google, you'll still need some C++ code components for lightning executions of code and then PHP or anyother language can display the results at the front-end.

And I believe Facebook and Google are using C++ components behind their PHP, just read somewhere.

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I'm not saying C# is better

You could say that and I wouldn't care. I was just trying to understand your reasoning behind a somewhat confusing statement.

I hope what I'm saying is correct HAHAHA

Correctness aside, I still don't understand what you're trying to say. :D

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You could say that and I wouldn't care. I was just trying to understand your reasoning behind a somewhat confusing statement.


Correctness aside, I still don't understand what you're trying to say. :D

Here's the idea, if you're going to create a programming language, then the big question is, what does it differ from others? ofcourse it can't be the same. there has so be reasons for it to be created. TASM is also a programming language and can do anything. But if so, why did others created such higher languages such as B , C or C++ if it just can do the same thing? Same goes with the C# and Java.

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C++ ain't dying. People just believe it is because more languages are evolving and besides, many don't have the knowledge capacity to handle C++ so rather than say they don't have the IQ, they say C++ cant handle what they want.

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I'm curious. How does Java differ from say, C#, in your opinion? They're comparable in my experience, but your statement suggests that Java is somehow more powerful (ie. supports "fancy" programs) while .NET has better support for RAD.

Especially for hosted applications (webapps, etc.) it's often more expensive to get a provider who supports Java than one who supports .NET.
This no doubt has to do with the more "enterprisey" feel of JEE, which attracts larger accounts with bigger requirements and the deeper pockets that go along with those.

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^ I think its more to do with the fact that running Glassfish is much more resource intensive than running IIS, making it impractical for shared cheap hosting, yet popular for people to use internally.

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TASM is also a programming language and can do anything.

TASM is an assembler, not a language. It's no more of a language than VC++ 2010, Turbo C. or gcc

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TASM is an assembler, not a language. It's no more of a language than VC++ 2010, Turbo C. or gcc

OH yeah... My bad. Sorry :)

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^ I think its more to do with the fact that running Glassfish is much more resource intensive than running IIS, making it impractical for shared cheap hosting, yet popular for people to use internally.

Glassfish is rather heavy, but there are lightweight alternatives out there like JBoss that are far more popular for hosting production sites.
Despite the press releases, Glassfish is a niche product.

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C++ will not and should not die because I just started learning it...

That's the most compelling reason why C++ cannot die. Jingda just started using it!

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C++ will not and should not die because I just started learning it...

You see? more and more people are learning it

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C++ will not and should not die because I just started learning it...

I await your posts in the C++ forum with baited breath.

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Glassfish is rather heavy, but there are lightweight alternatives out there like JBoss that are far more popular for hosting production sites.
Despite the press releases, Glassfish is a niche product.

Couldnt agree more. I ended up using Resin, myself.

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If you have a website traffic like Facebook, Youtube or Google, you'll still need some C++ code components for lightning executions of code and then PHP or anyother language can display the results at the front-end.

And I believe Facebook and Google are using C++ components behind their PHP, just read somewhere.

That's close. Facebook has a lot of good PHP developers, but they needed the blistering speed of C, so they created a PHP compiler that compiles PHP to C.

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