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I started in '87 with Atari Basic, I was little and, at that time, it was just something fun to do, I liked to try changing little list of codes I had. After that I attended my first "programming" class, in which I learned GWBasic, it was '91/'92 I think. Just fun.

One of the greatest training experiences about programming and general computer know-how, for me, were the lectures done by the BSRF (BlackSun Research Facility) group in IRC around 2000/2002. Now, that group does not exists anymore, but it is there that I realized my passion for programming.

Edited by cereal

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basic looks familiar, I had a trs80 that seemed to have something else..1986.
I walked away, stepped up again in 98 (of course), dabbled with the past for a very short time..gave it up. Even dos died. then found a high level language called TCL where you can make small libraries to satisfy a lesser itch to go anywhere with programming.. I never want to be pro, never will be going on 40. My age group and the net. yikes. the stories are billionare hair raising. I did make one program that needs a look over several times to remember what I did. I don't have a desire to program ever again.

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I started programming with QBASIC when i was 14. Le Wild Teacher just showed up one morning and started teaching QBASIC and didn't even tell us it was called programming. Le Wild me enjoyed it and afterwards started herping around frequently in the computer lab using QBASIC to herp out just about anything from drawing shapes to playing sounds and solving quadratic equations. I then started wondering about how GUI application were made since QBASIC was practically just CLI based. I found out about VB .NET but then couldn't download Visual Studio 2005 cos my internet connection's max. speed was about 20kB/s (I live in Nigeria and i can testify that internet access was really shitty back then) so i abandoned it.

Two years later I herped my derp into college to study Computer Sciecne (which i regret till today) and voila i met some guys in 3rd year who gave me VS 2005 and SQL Server 2005 and in my journey which has now spanned roughly about 6 years i've learnt:

  • VB .NET (had to switch to C# cos of a general stereotype that VB is for the weak)
  • C (which if not for the fact that i had to pass exams, i wouldn't have learnt it)
  • C++ (same goes for C++ as well, only difference is that it gave me a very evil understanding of object oriented programming)
  • C# (due to the wonderful IDE called Visual Studio, this has become my default language of choice)
  • JAVA (which i detested at first, but due to pressure from my lecturer to collaborate with him on a project had to learn)
  • PHP (which i absolutely cherished until ASP. NET MVC 3 came along and blew my mind away)
  • ASP .NET (i seriously loathe the years i wasted on this epic piece of crap)
  • ASP .NET MVC (i brand this as the third most awesome thing that has come of redmond after windows 7 and Visual Studio)
  • Lua (which i've been using lately to herp out some awesome stuff with CryEngine 3)

I'm approaching 22 now nd currently run a Software Dev. company nd when i look back, i'm like -- how was i able to herp myself all the way here. I guess it all has to do with passion and interest.

**forgive my usage of the words "herp", "derp" nd "le wild". the effects of Rage/Troll Comics*

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@DDANBE - Good to see someone else who came by the same route. I started by programming my physics labs in 1971 as a first year chemical engineering student. I kept burning holes in my lab coat so I switched to computer science. I've programmed on punch cards, paper and cassette tape on micros (GE, IMSAI), minis (Data General, DEC) and mainframes (CDC, IBM, SEL, Prime) and since 1985 on various personal computers (VIC20, C64, Amiga, PC). Since 1971 I have written code in FORTRAN, PL/1, APL, Assembler (several flavours), COBOL, SNOBOL, Algol (60 and 68C), Basic, VB, vbScript, C, C++, and Paradox. To be complete I should include one program I wrote in my 3rd year compiler writing course. I named my language ODDBOL ;-)

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