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Hello,

I would like to know your opinions how much time is needed to study so that your knowledge would be up to date and you would not get fired of job? :) I am talking about reading books, blogs, watching screencasts.

It is imposible to learn everything, so the goal cannot be measured by I learn this this and this, and then I can rest, becasue there are tons of those "this this and this".

The time is very limited, as there are lots of other fun activities after work time, those would easily fullfil my freetime, there is rarely a day in my life that I would not have something to do. Hobbies, girls. Later maybe will be family. Plus I like to sleep at least 8 hours per day.

My dream job would be such that during job I would learn all new stuff I need, but I feel that I got most of my knowledge while I was unemployed and during employment time I learn not much comparing to what I learned by being unemployed. I heard there are people who don't study at home, and they learn everfything during work. Also I even know one company where people have time for other things during workday (some play games - I think would definitely use this time for studying).

So I need to figure out what is the minumum required time on average lets say per week. Of course not only time is important, but what exatcly you learn in that time if you can learn quickly then its fine, go to bar and dring beer, if not, sit at home and study :) but its dificullt to measure by amount of imformation, so time would be at least for orientation.

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Last Post by Lardmeister
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I came across this article a few years ago when I was trying to find the Earl Nightingale quote, therein. I have found it to be a good guideline for staying at the top of the game. While you may or may not want (or be able to afford the time) to invest one hour a day to learning, it gives a good idea of consistency being the most important: http://www.briantracy.com/blog/personal-success/one-hour-makes-all-the-difference/

Edited by Dalek Caan

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I think that when you are passionate about something, learning about it is generally easier and it quicker to absorb. Since this "passion" is going to vary from person to person it's difficult to identify a reasonable amount of time. I do agree that learning about new things should be happening at least daily. It's also OK to have other hobbies and family life. I don't think it's healthy to focus only on one thing alone. You have also put energy into your social life as well.

Try to set some time each day, and at the same time of the day to learn about new things. 5-10 hours is probably reasonable and effective for most people.

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I would like to know your opinions how much time is needed to study so that your knowledge would be up to date and you would not get fired of job? :) I

IT people don't become technologically obsolete over night -- it takes several years for that to happen. You won't be expected to do a lot of studying to keep up-to-date, maybe once a week or so would be sufficient as long as you are competent in your job. Someone going new into the job market may have to study more often in order to improve your knowledge and skils. But at some point you can slow down to more infrequent study periods. That is, of course, unless you plan to be a medical doctor :)

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Its also quite easy to slot learning into other activities if you're smart about it. Eg. listen to podcasts while you do chores, read blogs quite you eat breakfast/lunch,

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You won't be expected to do a lot of studying to keep up-to-date, maybe once a week or so would be sufficient as long as you are competent in your job.

By once a week - then how many hours that "once" you are talking about? If 5, then its the same as 5 days for 1 hour.

Eg. listen to podcasts while you do chores, read blogs quite you eat breakfast/lunch,

Good idea, but reading blogs take time, and I don't get up early enough :) I eat quickly at mornings. But on evennings it might be good idea. Just little problem - sometimes its good to practically test code snippets, experiment with them. And while eating its harder. But yeah, overall its good idea to eat and study.
About podcasts actually I havent't heard much. Could you suggest some podcasts resources? I could listen them on my way to work if there is good resources :)

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Flexibility and the willingness to learn new things is most important. Also stop watching TV, it is bound to make you stupid.

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TV is *programmed* to make you stupid.
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