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  1. For developing productive software
  2. For learning (learning C++ language, implementing algorithms and data structures) or solving fun programming problem.
  3. I don't use it

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NOTE
I haven't been in Daniweb for years and there are so many changes that I don't even know how to create a poll (or maybe this feature has been removed).

Reason

A few days ago, I am starting developing a small open-source portable C++ IDE for fun. My aim is not to compete with any other IDE in term of rich-features. Instead, I focus on simple interface, easy to use, and good for educational purpose. One of our main feature is that it is easy to get C++ code running (no need to creating new project, no need to save the file before able to compile and run, just write code and press F5). So, the reason behind this post is to measure my potential audiences which is people who casually use C++ for doing small thing.

Edited by invisal

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4 Years
Discussion Span
Last Post by asrockw7
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I've often used C/C++ to do just simple trivial tasks like trying out an algorithm or doing exercises so usually creating projects is such a pain in the ass. In this regard, I've preferred something like Code::Blocks because you can compile a single source file without the need of a project file, as opposed to something like Visual Studio. Plenty of work at school are done in either PHP or C# (Because of the library functions).

If you can make the IDE as simple to use as a text editor, then I might actually check it out. Quick to open. No fuss. No prompts. Minimal interface.

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I prefer to stick to C when I can, but some things are best done in C++ rather than C. I tend to C++ when I'm dealing with virutal yet tangeable objects (if that makes sense). For example when dealing numerous objects like balls, blocks etc. in a simulation, I use C++, but I'm not so worried about OOP or no OOP when it comes to things that, for example, might be socket.connect(); instead of socket_connect(socket);

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If you can make the IDE as simple to use as a text editor, then I might actually check it out. Quick to open. No fuss. No prompts. Minimal interface.

It is what I am aimming to. Does the below screenshot a minimal interface in your opinion?
9f19359898fa15e7c5ac250840524add

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It's good that there's only a Run/Stop and no debug/release modes and whatnot. That's about bare functionality that would make me satisfied. I think that the line and column numbers below are also nice since I try to keep my code limited column-wise.

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