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Last Post by Riv3n
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I got 80% on the test, with #3 and #13 incorrect.

Heh heh, and I don't even drive a car (commute everywhere). :D

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I received a 60%. The last time I drove was on the 4th of July 2006 on a majorly crowded highway in Weehawken, NJ headed towards NYC; the brakes stoppd working and we slammed into the back of a SUV. :eek: No one was hurt in either vehicle, luckily. My girlfriend's van was "undrivable" so declared the Port Authority that pulled the two vehicles apart from eachother (they were stuck together at the fenders, the SUV imbedded in our van).

There was no ticket issued, no insurance claims-- nothing. We had the van towed to a parking lot and it never ran again; would not start, no brakes, leaking all types of unknown fluids, etc. We had a junkyard tow it away. I have not driven since. But, with all the mass transit here, why would I ever need a vehicle anyway? I like not driving. :) Less money, less danger, less hassle, less stress.

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Your score was: 85%

A score of 70% or better is considered passing on a state written drivers test. The correct answers are highlighted below.
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I passed the test and I'm not from America... The rules are different where I'm from

They say that 1 out of 11 drivers cant score better then 70% on this test.....

:eek:
Where I come from, driverlicenses are taken very seriously. When I got mine (about five years ago) it cost me 23 lessons and 1100 euro (= $1300). The average for a license these days is 2000 euro....

Edited by Nick Evan: n/a

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95% here, missed #3 (but I hardly ever use high beams, so my answer should have counted :p). I suppose that's a good thing, since I do like to drive... unfortunately my car got totaled the day after Christmas (no injuries thank goodness), and I'm still resolving the insurance claim :(

Oh, and my drivers ed costed $400ish as I recall, for 10 driving lessons and 10 or 20 classroom lessons... that was 5 years ago as well, so I don't remember exactly.

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Where I come from, driverlicenses are taken very seriously. When I got mine (about five years ago) it cost me 23 lessons and 1100 euro (= $1300). The average for a license these days is 2000 euro....

Niek

Wow. Is that a one-time fee or do you have to renew every so many years?

I got a 90%. I had no idea when highways were most slippery...

Edited by Nick Evan: n/a

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Wow. Is that a one-time fee or do you have to renew every so many years?

One time fee thank god...
20 lessons is the minimum here in Holland. It is written in the law :eek:

Edited by Nick Evan: n/a

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I got 70% which I was rather impressed by seeing as I have a UK driving license (clean, and held for some 25 years now) and the rules/signs are very different here. I have never driven in the US either.

Just goes to show that common sense is common sense wherever you are, I guess.

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:cool: I got 100% - looks like I have been taking driving seriously over the past few months. :mrgreen:

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The last time I drove was on the 4th of July 2006 on a majorly crowded highway in Weehawken, NJ headed towards NYC; the brakes stoppd working and we slammed into the back of a SUV. :eek: No one was hurt in either vehicle, luckily.

You were lucky to escape injuries. You wouldn't need to drive within NYC anyway. I only tried driving in Manhattan once and it was terrible, though it's not as bad as driving in Mumbai. :p

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I got a 90%. I had no idea when highways were most slippery...

The reason it's most slippery at that point is because the oils from people's tires/leaks (and even from the asphalt) and the silt that's settled during the dry spell gets loose from the fresh rain and makes things slick. If it's been damp recently, that stuff will mostly have washed off, so the road won't be as bad.

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One time fee thank god...
20 lessons is the minimum here in Holland. It is written in the law :eek:

Niek

We should probably have a law like that here in the US.

I don't know what's happening with this, but here in Pennsylvania the driving age was going to be raised to 18. Not sure if it will still happen or not.

The reason it's most slippery at that point is because the oils from people's tires/leaks (and even from the asphalt) and the silt that's settled during the dry spell gets loose from the fresh rain and makes things slick. If it's been damp recently, that stuff will mostly have washed off, so the road won't be as bad.

I never thought of that. Learn something new every day :cheesy:

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Wow. Is that a one-time fee or do you have to renew every so many years?

I got a 90%. I had no idea when highways were most slippery...

That's the cost for driving lessons in Europe, give or take (depending on how many lessons and exams you need of course).

Over here (in most countries) you MUST hire a qualified driving instructor, anyone else is by law prohibited from giving lessons on public roads (like with flying lessons, where only a qualified instructor is allowed to hand the controls to someone without a license).

License renewal in this country is required every 10 years but is purely administrative, costing about €90.
For people over 70 or so and people with certain medical conditions (like diabetes) a medical certificate is required to be allowed to renew their license and the renewal may be given for a shorter than usual period (say 5 years).

I scored 85% on that test, not bad for someone who has to guess at US roadsigns more often than not.
They're quite different from European ones, and some of the rules are contradictory to ours.
For example our rules for high beam lights require them to be used as little as possible and then only where legally allowed and safe (which is stricter than the US rule apparently).
You could get fined for running them unnecessarilly (with the definition of that being up to the officer writing the ticket).

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OMFG I got 80% and:

a) Im english so the signs made no sense
b) im 16 so i cant drive

What is the driving age there?

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For example our rules for high beam lights require them to be used as little as possible and then only where legally allowed and safe (which is stricter than the US rule apparently).
You could get fined for running them unnecessarilly (with the definition of that being up to the officer writing the ticket).

The rules for high beam are different for different states. For example, it is rarely required to use high bean within New Jersey and the DMV rules state that high bean should be used as little as possible (and there is hardly anything specific mentioned about high beam lights). I haven't heard anyone being fined for that. Arizona, on the other hand, states in its rule book that high beam should be used on desert highways if another vehicle is not within 50 ft in front and an officer can issue a ticket if it is not switched to low beam in time. Of course, it's almost impossible to drive through those straight desert highways without a high beam.

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What is the driving age there?

can do a moped or bike up to a certain cc as of 16

17 can apply for licence and start getting lessons (although this is going up to 18)

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That's not too bad. 16 is the driving age here and I never even went to get my permit until I was 18 and didn't go get my actual license til I was 21.

I was scared to drive :p

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in most European countries you can't drive a car until you're 18, in some you can start lessons at 17 but can't take the exam until you're 18.

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That's not too bad. 16 is the driving age here and I never even went to get my permit until I was 18 and didn't go get my actual license til I was 21.

same, most of my friends are having lessons or have mopeds but the insurance for under 21s (especially boys) is sky high

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I got my license first thing on my 16th birthday. Even sat outside the Dept. of Licensing office till they opened. :D

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they're silently moving towards raising the age to 21 here it seems.
Special "probationary" licenses are now issued to people under 21, which get automatically cancelled after 3 traffic violations...

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thats quite a good idea

you see, i wouldnt mind something like that here but the truth is that public transport is so crap that you are forced to drive

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you see, i wouldnt mind something like that here but the truth is that public transport is so crap that you are forced to drive

That's been my experience in US. Public transport is limited and having a car proves relatively economical, much in contrast with how it works in Mumbai. Driving a car in Mumbai is the last thing I would want to do.

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I got 55%. :sad:
And I already got my driving license 8 years ago.
Everyone..beware! :eek:

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