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I don't really know a whole lot about the computer field, but from what I've read and from what Duki's told me, the Cisco Certified InterNetworking Expert (CCIE) seems to be the most sought after title from hiring managers.

What do you think?

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Last Post by christina>you
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  • I'm other, I got parts of those. Currently have A+ Network+, Security+, MCSA, CCNA. Currently working on my MCSE. Read More

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    CCIE. I hope to attain this one day :) Read More

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    I tend to look at certifications as a very good foot in the door. Honestly, I can't see a company hiring a guy with 15 years experience and no certs over a CCIE or MCSE with 10 years. Experience is definitely a key factor in job placement, though certifications will … Read More

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    i like certifications because it's a reassurance to myself as well. I disagree that certifications are useless though. Yeah you might have a dud who just memorized questions, but so what... fire him. And actually, people complained to Cisco a couple years back saying hey you're certifying these people in … Read More

  • I love nurses -- the ones I met when I was in the hospital are great and competent people. I don't think I have met a bad nurse, but I have met what I consider lousy doctors (quacks). I think nursing is the second-best profession in the world, only next … Read More

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I have a friend that is already employed for a job like that and she just graduated from high school this year (yesterday actually). I think she's just certified in a few basic classes at my school like VB and Java.

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I'm other, I got parts of those. Currently have A+ Network+, Security+, MCSA, CCNA. Currently working on my MCSE.

Votes + Comments
^ agreed. :)
Impressive. :)
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I voted CCIE as well.
And my second choice would be RHCE.
IMHO, if you have these two certifications, you can pretty much write your own paycheck.

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I voted CCIE, but it really comes down to experience...

Also, programming certs (like for Java, VB, etc...) are worthless, and A+ are a dime a dozen. CCIE, MCSE, and RHCE (and maybe, just maybe, CCSP) are probably the only ones of any great value on the list.

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I voted other.. I consider A+ to be the most valuable certification, because it is the only certification that I have :) lol

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I believe Infarction is right, certifications will get your foot in the door, but experience is what will get you the better jobs.

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None of those certifications are worth the paper they are written on because people can just read the book and pass the tests with no experience. That makes the certifications worthless. Experience is what really counts.

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reackon i could put daniweb down as work experience on my university application? im going for a computer networking degree

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reackon i could put daniweb down as work experience on my university application? im going for a computer networking degree

You are now an experienced poster, if that counts;)

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We generally don't hold certs in that high a regard here simply because anyone with a decent memory can pass them.

I have a MCP in SQL Server 2000 Programming but I only have it cos at my last place of work I was given the opportunity to have a week off work, expenses paid and do the training.

If i was a hiring manager I'd be more interested in a good degree and how they come across in an interview; whether or not they can answer my questions on the spot etc.

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None of those certifications are worth the paper they are written on because people can just read the book and pass the tests with no experience. That makes the certifications worthless. Experience is what really counts.

True, but the tester must know the information if he/she passes the exam.. Some people never take the courses, but learn from experience and can pass the exam easily..

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Memorizing and regurgitating information is one thing, being able to apply this information in a practical application is another, and that's where experience comes into play.

As for how you come by this knowledge, I would be more interested in hiring the person who was self taught and pass their certification. The person who learned by their own efforts may not have had the structured curriculum that a class would offer, but from my own experience I know that I have received a much broader education by teaching myself.

There are those that are auto-didactic and will actually do better outside of a structured class.

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Without these certifications, what good are you then?
No employer is going to hire you just because you say you have "good experience" backed up with no certifications.

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>Without these certifications, what good are you then?
Just as good as you are without them.

>No employer is going to hire you just because you say you have "good
>experience" backed up with no certifications.
I like to think that I have a bit of experience with this (having conducted quite a few interviews and made hiring decisions), and I'm pretty sure that you're wrong. It all evens out because the losers who think certifications are worth something will be hired by the crappy employers that think certifications mean something. And the superior candidates who let their experience talk are hired by the smart employers that look for superior candidates.

You don't need a certification to define what kind of worker you are.

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>Without these certifications, what good are you then?
Just as good as you are without them.

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>No employer is going to hire you just because you say you have "good
>experience" backed up with no certifications.
I like to think that I have a bit of experience with this (having conducted quite a few interviews and made hiring decisions), and I'm pretty sure that you're wrong. It all evens out because the losers who think certifications are worth something will be hired by the crappy employers that think certifications mean something. And the superior candidates who let their experience talk are hired by the smart employers that look for superior candidates.

You don't need a certification to define what kind of worker you are.

Then why go to school? Why get an education? -If it doesn't do anything for you??

Certifications show that you have studied.

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>??
I can't believe you didn't understand what I meant to wrote and naively tried to understand what I actually wrote. ;) Sorry about that, I meant "Just as good as you are with them."

>Then why go to school? Why get an education? -If it doesn't do anything for you??
I can't decide if you're joking or if you seriously think that's a good argument.

>Certifications show that you have studied.
No, certifications show that you have passed a test. There's a subtle difference.

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Personally, I'm going to my RHCA, which is a set of some of the best performance based tests I've taken so far. Out of the list above I've only taken my CCNP and RHCE, neither of which were overly challenging but equally as important in my eyes.

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>Then why go to school? Why get an education? -If it doesn't do anything for you??
I can't decide if you're joking or if you seriously think that's a good argument.

Well why don't you answer it then?

>Certifications show that you have studied.
No, certifications show that you have passed a test. There's a subtle difference.

To pass a test, you must study. Goodness... I thought everyone knew that.

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>Well why don't you answer it then?
Because it's a logical fallacy.

>To pass a test, you must study.
Yes, for the test. The abundance of cliff's notes should tell you that studying for a test hardly gives you sufficient understanding of the subject. It just puts you in a better position to pick the right answer out of four options. :icon_rolleyes:

>Goodness... I thought everyone knew that.
And I thought that everyone knew the difference between formal schooling and a certification. I guess we were both wrong.

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>To pass a test, you must study.
Yes, for the test. The abundance of cliff's notes should tell you that studying for a test hardly gives you sufficient understanding of the subject. It just puts you in a better position to pick the right answer out of four options. :icon_rolleyes:

Then maybe it's just me, but whenever I take a test and I study for it, I tend to remember the material afterwards as well. I do know from what Duki has told me, that the MCSE/CCNP exams have simulations which count as a major part of your score. So it's not always four options. :icon_rolleyes:

>Goodness... I thought everyone knew that.
And I thought that everyone knew the difference between formal schooling and a certification. I guess we were both wrong.

I'm not saying that certifications are better than formal schooling and experience, I'm just saying that if 2 people apply for the same job with the same experience, but 1 has a certification, who would you hire?

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>So it's not always four options.
No, just most of the time. The majority of questions in a certification test will be multiple choice. That's statistically the easiest form of test to take. You really don't even have to study, by my definition of study, which could very well be different from yours.

>who would you hire?
The best one for the job. You see, at that point the certification is useless because they'll already have made it to the interview on their experience (otherwise your situation is nonsensical). Any decent interviewer won't care what certifications you have because he or she will be able to ask questions and provide problems that tell so much more about a candidate's suitability than a passing test score.

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To pass a test, you must study. Goodness... I thought everyone knew that.

No not really..... I know lots of people who never study, myself included...

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certifications were never intended to be a substitute for a college education or practical experience. Knowing nothing about either candidate I would always hire the person with the experience and proven track record over one with just certifications and no experience. The person with certifications might be hired for entry-level position but the person with experience would be hired for a position well above entry level and consequently receive a better salary.

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Ancient Dragon. I seem to recall that you mentioned once that you came to the world of programming being fairly mature.
I am not as old, but old enough to think that schooling might not be a solution. Is there any hope for a hobbyist like me, to someday get a entry position at coding.
What's should be, if any, the realistic goal I should persue?. Any comment?.

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