-2

Good day Govenor Daniels: 7-4-07
I don't know if you are aware of the so called "Rad-waste-problem" or not. I submit to you that there is no problem. A while back I found out that these rad-waste containers or "casks," constructed around old reactor cores, have a skin temperature of 350 degrees. This is more than enough to boil water It seems plausible to me that a boiler, or steam generator could be constructed using the type of heavy tanks that are currently being used to transport liquefied propane that are mounted on semi-trailers that make large deliveries. These casks that are piling up all over the United States, and the rest of the world for that matter, which at the moment, nobody wants, could be configured into a low cost giant electrical power plant, or used to heat large buildings directly. It seems obvious to me, that making an attempt to re-use these old cores would solve several problems at once..... Consider:
1. Cost of reprocessing rad-waste.
2. Solving the rad-waste burial problems.
3. Providing "spot energy" for small users, as these units could be thought of as large water heaters.
4. Using rad waste casks to manufacture fresh water from salt water, in Death Valley.
5. Reducing the amount of transmission towers, and related problems of maintaining them.
6. Can be constructed with off the shelf items.
7. Billions of dollars in savings.
8. As safe or safer than a pebble bed reactor.
9. Are those cooling towers on nuclear plants really needed?
10. A word about coal fired plants.

Item number 1. The United States no longer reprocesses rad-waste to any great extent.This is because of bad planning, bad engineering, and human blunders that damaged and contaminated the processing plants, and made them unusable. Also, the liquid radioactive waste that has leaked out of on site storage tanks hasn't helped matters much either. Overall, these problems were caused because the amount and types of radiation that is given off from freshly discarded cores, was greatly underestimated. This is because of the "daughter" elements that are created by the fission process. Some of the elements are short lived. For example, the polonium 210 that was used to kill the Russian reporter has a half life of only thirty days. The only way you can you can obtain this element, is to mine a reactor core. At any rate, if the cores are allowed to "cool off" for ten years or so, most of the hard radiation will be greatly reduced. I submit that by creating a "middle step" of harvesting heat from these cores, instead of burying them, will drastically reduce the cost of reprocessing spent cores. Another item that is not widely known, is that between ninety five to ninety seven percent of the energy of the original core is retained in the spent cores. This is what produces the latent heat output. With the price of nuclear fuel rising, it would make a substantial cost savings to reuse old cores.

Item number 2. Solving the rad-waste burial problems. As far as I know, not one single cask of rad-waste has been safely "buried" anywhere in the United States, or anywhere else in the world for that matter. Over a billion dollars has been spent on the Yucca mountains project, and has went nowhere. Also, the amount of rad-waste that has been created up to this point would more than exceed the tunnel space that has been excavated so far. By the way, have fun trying to convince all the people in the area, that it's a good idea to live down the street from a high level rad-waste dump. Reusing high level rad-waste would solve this problem. The Yucca mountains people, might not have an objection to having "low level" waste being put into tunnels. Low level waste being, boots, gloves, clothing, respirator masks, and small quantities of short lived rad-waste products, such as hospital rad-waste discards.

Item number 3. Providing "spot energy" for small individual users, as these core units could be thought of as large water heaters.... Another twist to the concept of reusing rad waste, is that believe it or not, you do not have to use the radioactive material in the old cores to generate electricity. A nuclear power plant, once you remove all the bells and whistles, is simply a giant water heater. The reason why a reactor has to be refueled, is not because it will no longer boil water, its because it will no longer boil water at the design rate of the reactor. Putting it another way... A reactor may have a 5 megawatt design rating. Over time, the power output will fall below this rating as the fuel decays. At some point after this it must be refueled to stay at the 5 megawatt power level. At this point the spent fuel is removed, and placed in a cooling pond separate from the main reactor. This is why most reactors are located next to a river, large lake, or ocean. There is so much waste heat generated, that to cool the reactor in an emergency, any municipal water source would be inadequate and overwhelmed. In the old days, the spent rods cooled for a time, in these ponds, and then were shipped to a reprocessing plant. As stated earlier, this proved to be a disaster. As a result, spent cores are now gathering dust, so to speak, at nuclear power plants all over the United States, as there is no longer a place to put them The same river water that helps cool the reactor, cools these rad waste core ponds. The result of this whole mishmash, is that much useable energy is being wasted heating bodies of water instead of large buildings.This whole situation could be resolved if the rad-waste was containerized and used at factories or large buildings to provide heat. One other example come to mind. As everyone knows, ethanol plants are springing up all over the United States. These companies use energy to separate alcohol from water. The boiling point of alcohol is about 175 degrees fahrenheit. This is all the heat you need to complete the processing of ethanol. There are over one hundred ethanol plants in the U.S. alone. Currently, most of these ethanol plants use natural gas to provide the heat input. This not only uses valuable natural gas, it also adds to the overall cost of the ethanol. Using the heat from rad-waste however, changes the situation 180 degrees. In other words, motor fuel can be manufactured at a lower cost using the casks of rad-waste that nobody else wants.

Item number 4. Using rad waste casks to manufacture fresh water from salt water, in Death Valley. According to all the unsubstantiated gossip I have been hearing over the years, the state of California is a drop or two short of fresh water, among other things. Seeing as how Death Valley is 198 feet below sea level, it would be a matter of simple physics to run a pipeline from the Pacific ocean to the valley and fill it with sea water. No pump would be needed, as gravity would provide all the siphon action that would be needed. A solar powered desalinating plant could be built at the site to provide distilled water to the rest of the state, and neighboring states. Also, a turbo generator could be placed in the pipeline to generate electricity as a by-product. It would be a simple matter to use conical mirrors to generate all of the heat that you would want, to boil all of the water that you would want, to obtain all of the distilled water that you would want.... And at night, the rad waste casks would take over in place of the sun.
By the way, here is an added bonus.... And a riddle. When I said the water could be delivered to neighboring states, this could be done for free, ignoring the pipeline costs, by using gravity, and ram pumps. Do you know what I am describing? I don't think too many people know what a ram pump is.

Item number 5. Reducing the amount of transmission towers, and related weather and maintainance problems to them. As you well know, it costs big bucks to transmit power from one place to another. A large amount of this power is used to keep buildings warm in cold weather. Centrally located bundles of rad waste casks could be located near cities to pipe steam to large buildings. This would reduce the loads on large transmission lines. Va rations of this concept have already been tried. For example: The Ford auto plant in Detroit had its own coal fired power plant. In emergences, the plant was able to supply the city with power, when the city had power problems with its own power systems.
And while I am at it, the power companies could do a better job in designing high voltage transmission towers. It seems to me that with a slight design change, the same transmission towers could also support an anemometer type of windmill. For those of you who don't know what an anemometer is, it looks like three ping pong balls cut in half on three rods, rotating on a vertical axis, turning a generator. In other words, it would be very easy to build transmission towers to move power from one place to another, and generate power at the same time. Why haven't the power companies thought of this?

Item Number 6. Can be constructed with off the shelf items. The electrical power system that exists in the United States, is the worlds largest invention. The current costs and payments run into billions of dollars per year. What I am proposing, amounts to cutting costs with no layoffs to power company employees. No new equipment has to be designed, or no different type of metal has to be forged. All that has to be accomplished, is to place old rad waste cores in casks, and these casks placed in boilers to generate heat. The shell of the boiler can be made from the same liquid propane containers that are used to transport propane on large trucks. Another rather large advantage would be small size of such heat generators. Each steam or hot water generator unit would be self contained. It, or they could be placed in remote locations, with little maintainance.The units could also be used to create hydrogen gas, which could be injected into natural gas pipelines directly, thus reliving the gas shortage problem.

Item Number 7. Billions of dollars in savings. First off, let's stop the thirty years of worthless talk of burying the rad waste in the Yucca mountain area. That idea has went nowhere, and never will. According to Wall Street Journal articles on the subject, the amount of rad waste sitting around at nuclear plants, already exceed the amount of burial space created in the tunnels. The fact is, that this material generates enough heat, that it can be used for lower level heat sources. So why not use it!

Item number 8. As safe or safer than a pebble bed reactor. For those of you people that may have come to the conclusion that this article does not make any sense, what I am proposing is exactly the same thing as the new generation of nuclear reactors, called the pebble bed reactors. In the pebble bed reactor, softball sized uranium pellets are installed in a empty reactor vessel until the proper heat output is obtained. To explain further, in a "standard reactor," uranium fuel rods are installed in the vessel, and the heat output is regulated, by raising or lowering the control rods. When the heat output drops below a certain level, the reactor has to be taken out of service until new fuel rods can be installed. In a pebble bed reactor, the softball sized spheres can be added until the heat output is at the design level of the reactor. As time passes, and the heat level of the spheres decrease, the old spheres can be removed, and new fresh spheres can be added, while the reactor is in operation. The big advantage of a pebble bed reactor, over a "standard" reactor is that the loss of coolant problem is eliminated. In a "standard reactor," a loss of coolant leads to a meltdown, in a pebble bed reactor, a loss of coolant causes no problem, as the spheres do not cause reactor floor melting.

Item Number 9. Are those cooling towers on nuclear plants really needed? It seems to me that if there is enough "leftover"heat in the power generating process, that some of it has to be diverted to the atmosphere, there is enough left to generate more electrical power. One does not have to boil water to generate electricity. Other enticement can also be used. Freon, for example, can also be used. There are also other elements, such as propane, but for this example, freon is used. There are many different types of freon, and all boil at temperatures of less than 212 degrees. Freon "steam" can also be harnessed to generate electrical power.

Item Number 10. A word about coal fired plants. I haven't the slightest idea why someone else in the power generation business hasn't thought of this, but you can greatly reduce the amount of smokestack particle discharge by simply mixing the stack exhaust gases with spare steam. Without going in to great detail, the steam would remove the fly ash, and do an excellent job of cleaning the discharge gases. The same thing happens when crud in the atmosphere gets caught in a thunderstorm. The water vapor condenses on the dust particles, and falls to earth. If this were not true, all of the dust that been put into the atmosphere since the beginning of time, would still be there.

Thank you for your attention.
Steve Behling,
56270 Chapel Lane,
South Bend, Indiana, United States of America.
46619-1123
1-574-288-8354
stevex@michiana.org

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me either
I don't understand your poll..
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the best way to reduce CO2 emissions (which seems to be all the greenies are concerned about, showing just how shortsighted and illinformed they are) is to kill all those greenies (taking away all their emissions from breathing as well as all other activities) and use their ground up bodies as fertiliser.

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stevex, your poll makes no sense whatsoever - much like the rest of what you posted....

That has to be some of the most useless drivel I have read in some time.

1

Steve, I'm afraid your ideas are only reasonable to you because your mind doesn't allow you to entertain multiple ideas at once (quite clear from your writing, as well as from your proposals).


I do not have the time or energy to challenge all your ideas, but I will however challenge your most flawed ideas that most clearly show your lack in understanding of the practical application of these ideas.

1.

Item number 4. Using rad waste casks to manufacture fresh water from salt water, in Death Valley. According to all the unsubstantiated gossip I have been hearing over the years, the state of California is a drop or two short of fresh water, among other things. Seeing as how Death Valley is 198 feet below sea level, it would be a matter of simple physics to run a pipeline from the Pacific ocean to the valley and fill it with sea water. No pump would be needed, as gravity would provide all the siphon action that would be needed. A solar powered desalinating plant could be built at the site to provide distilled water to the rest of the state, and neighboring states. Also, a turbo generator could be placed in the pipeline to generate electricity as a by-product. It would be a simple matter to use conical mirrors to generate all of the heat that you would want, to boil all of the water that you would want, to obtain all of the distilled water that you would want.... And at night, the rad waste casks would take over in place of the sun.
By the way, here is an added bonus.... And a riddle. When I said the water could be delivered to neighboring states, this could be done for free, ignoring the pipeline costs, by using gravity, and ram pumps. Do you know what I am describing? I don't think too many people know what a ram pump is.

Problem:
You just suggested making a giant still, filling the entirety of Death Valley (a national park) with sea water routed under 200 miles of rock and mountains, as a practical alternative to simply piping sea water to a processing plant along the coast.


2.

Item number 5. Reducing the amount of transmission towers, and related weather and maintainance problems to them. As you well know, it costs big bucks to transmit power from one place to another. A large amount of this power is used to keep buildings warm in cold weather. Centrally located bundles of rad waste casks could be located near cities to pipe steam to large buildings. This would reduce the loads on large transmission lines. Va rations of this concept have already been tried. For example: The Ford auto plant in Detroit had its own coal fired power plant. In emergences, the plant was able to supply the city with power, when the city had power problems with its own power systems.
And while I am at it, the power companies could do a better job in designing high voltage transmission towers. It seems to me that with a slight design change, the same transmission towers could also support an anemometer type of windmill. For those of you who don't know what an anemometer is, it looks like three ping pong balls cut in half on three rods, rotating on a vertical axis, turning a generator. In other words, it would be very easy to build transmission towers to move power from one place to another, and generate power at the same time. Why haven't the power companies thought of this?

Problem:
1. In your first paragraph you talked about the problem of the liquid waste spills. How would you purpose we pipe steam, which cools in pipes quickly, to large buildings without having the containers near the cities where a spill could have potentially result in damage to the ecology of the area and the utilities of the city?

2. Wind power generators are placed in smaller physical areas where wind is both strong and consistent. High voltage lines are placed in areas where land is cheap and the geography is convenient. Wind power generators usually have large blades so that the blades could create a flywheel effect, resisting the changes of the wind. The location of most high voltage lines would prevent them access to consistent wind speeds and movement, make them subject to causing power surges from gusts of wind because of their limited size (not desirable for power), and would make them more of an eyesore to the communities that they are located near (a problem that modern wind powered generators face).

Votes + Comments
It would take all day to wade through and address all of the problems with his suggestions. :)
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I want ironclad independently verified scientific proof before anybody does anything about it. So far, all I have seen is bad science.

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such science in the current scientific/political climate is sadly impossible as the budgets are controlled by religious envirofreaks.

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To TheGathering
First of all, thank you for your reply to my paper/posting. You are the type of person I am looking for. Because of my workload, overtime for 31 years, I couldn't respond immediately. Permit me to do so now. Your words are marked by an arrow....> My printing is not. Also I have made a copy of your posting and a CD backup, so you cannot say that I an making your response up of whole cloth. Also web pages are time/date stamped.

>I do not have the time or energy to challenge all your ideas, but I will however challenge your most >flawed ideas that most clearly show your lack in understanding of the practical application of these >ideas.
You have not presented a single argument to prove this.....Read on...

Item number 4. Using rad waste casks to manufacture fresh water from salt water, in Death Valley. According to all the unsubstantiated gossip I have been hearing over the years, the state of California is a drop or two short of fresh water, among other things. Seeing as how Death Valley is 198 feet below sea level, it would be a matter of simple physics to run a pipeline from the Pacific ocean to the valley and fill it with sea water. No pump would be needed, as gravity would provide all the siphon action that would be needed. A solar powered desalinating plant could be built at the site to provide distilled water to the rest of the state, and neighboring states. Also, a turbo generator could be placed in the pipeline to generate electricity as a by-product. It would be a simple matter to use conical mirrors to generate all of the heat that you would want, to boil all of the water that you would want, to obtain all of the distilled water that you would want.... And at night, the rad waste casks would take over in place of the sun.
By the way, here is an added bonus.... And a riddle. When I said the water could be delivered to neighboring states, this could be done for free, ignoring the pipeline costs, by using gravity, and ram pumps. Do you know what I am describing? I don't think too many people know what a ram pump is.

>Problem:
>You just suggested making a giant still, filling the entirety of Death Valley (a national park) with sea >water routed under 200 miles of rock and mountains, as a practical alternative to simply piping sea >water to a processing plant along the coast.

THANK YOU VERY MUCH. You pointed out a flaw in my paper. I should have been more descriptive. AND I WILL MODIFY MY PAPER. The reason why I proposed to build the still in the Valley, is because it would be immune to the hurricanes that plague the coasts. If you remember, the oil rigs off the coasts of Louisiana, they were wrecked by the water/winds. These rigs were made of SOLID STEEL. No wood, no wallboard, no nails. They were ripped up, and thrown on shore, or sank.
Death Valley would not have these problems.

Item number 5. Reducing the amount of transmission towers, and related weather and maintainance problems to them. As you well know, it costs big bucks to transmit power from one place to another. A large amount of this power is used to keep buildings warm in cold weather. Centrally located bundles of rad waste casks could be located near cities to pipe steam to large buildings. This would reduce the loads on large transmission lines. Va rations of this concept have already been tried. For example: The Ford auto plant in Detroit had its own coal fired power plant. In emergences, the plant was able to supply the city with power, when the city had power problems with its own power systems.
And while I am at it, the power companies could do a better job in designing high voltage transmission towers. It seems to me that with a slight design change, the same transmission towers could also support an anemometer type of windmill. For those of you who don't know what an anemometer is, it looks like three ping pong balls cut in half on three rods, rotating on a vertical axis, turning a generator. In other words, it would be very easy to build transmission towers to move power from one place to another, and generate power at the same time. Why haven't the power companies thought of this?

>Problem:
>1. In your first paragraph you talked about the problem of the liquid waste spills. How would you >>purpose we pipe steam, which cools in pipes quickly, to large buildings without having the >>>>>>containers near the cities where a spill could have potentially result in damage to the ecology >of the area and the utilities of the city?

Somehow you didn't get the jist of that part of my paper. I don't know why. Steam does not cool in pipes quickly. Example: And please excuse my wit. Let us say that you wish to take a shower, and wish to wash the filth/fleas/maggots/scum off of your uneducated body. You turn on the hot valve in the shower, and wait one minute while the hot water gets to the showerhead. At this point you must turn on the cold water valve, to get the proper temperature mix that suites you. The hot water does not cool off in the pipe before it gets to you, does it? Live superheated steam is much more active. Superheated steam typically travels through in a pipe at over one hundred miles per hour. The steam heats the pipe much faster than other forces can cool it off. Every country in the world, including the U.S., uses underground steam pipes to transmit heat to buildings in a circular area of a steam plant. This is more efficient than using electricity to do the same task, as energy is wasted in any conversion process. You might remember the steam pipe that ruptured in New York, after being in continuous service for ninety years! Also, why would a nuke plant need those massive cooling towers, if the excess steam cooled off before it gets there.
Now as far as as a nuke spill goes.....Thats just exactly what I am trying to PREVENT! The processing plant spills, and they have been nasty.........
Again, I will REVAMP my paper to reflect this, so thank you again....
were caused by processing new waste, only a few months old, after reactor refuelings. What I am proposing......Is using fresh rad-waste casks, to generate low level heat, around 350 degrees. More than enough to boil water, or generate steam. These rad-waste casks, which everyone else seems to know about except you, are designed to withstand extreme shock. Example: a New tractor trailer, remote controlled, with a cask chained to its bed, was slammed into a steel/concrete wall at 65 miles per hour for a test. The cask was ripped off the truck, and bounced around, but stayed intact. And there is a movie of this. The cask was fake, but did have a very small amount of rad-waste in it. The rest was fake scrap metal reactor core. AT ANY RATE, if you wait to process the core by at least 25 years or more, most of the rad-waste will decay, and make reprocessing much easier.


a>2. Wind power generators are placed in smaller physical areas where wind is both strong and b>>>>>>consistent. High voltage lines are placed in areas where land is cheap and the geography is c>>convenient. Wind power generators usually have large blades so that the blades could create a
d>>>flywheel effect, resisting the changes of the wind. The location of most high voltage lines would e>prevent them access to consistent wind speeds and movement, make them subject to causing
f>power surges from gusts of wind because of their limited size (not desirable for power), and would g>make them more of an eyesore to the communities that they are located near (a problem that
h>modern wind powered generators face).
At this point, you are running several different things together at once. Regarding lines a and b. Wrong! Wind generators are all over the world. Smaller ones, 6 to 12 foot blades, pump water for animal watering tanks world wide. Larger units generate electricity.
Regarding lines b and c. Wrong! High voltage lines are strung to make the most efficient use of power distribution from the plant to the city. Power plants don't pay for the land for the power towers, they use the government to annex the land, and then string the wire. In the front of your house, there are one or more poles. They are placed there weather you like it or not.
Regarding lines c and d. Wrong! You don't want a flywheel effect! You waste power to pump up a flywheel. That's why the blades are made of fiberglass. And there is no heavy steel or lead flywheel anywhere on the windmill. Or any windmill. Mail me a picture of a windmill with a flywheel on it.
Regarding lines d through h, it is total drivel. Number 1. You didn't read my paper carefully. What I wrote was using an anemometer type windmill. I will repeat. An anemometer type of windmill, looks like 3 ping pong balls cut in half, on a vertical axis, to catch the wind. These units work in winds of 1 mile per hour or more. These wind speeds exist all over the world.
As far as power surges go, these happen every hour for every power plant. You may notice this if the lights brighten for a second or so from time to time. The power system of the U.S. is so large that a power surge no longer disrupts the system. Other generators simply slow down for a few seconds. This is electronically controlled.
As far as an power tower/poles eyesore goes....WRONG! Correct me if I am wrong, but the pole next to your house is still there. You might not like the looks of it, but you will not saw it down, because you like the power it supplies. Also, what I am proposing are single stanshion power towers, that take up one square yard of ground space, as opposed to the cone shaped towers that take up thirty yards of ground space on a side.
If you have any more comments, please let me know.
Thank you,
Steve Behling 1.574.288.8354 ------ [snip!>

0

To TheGathering
First of all, thank you for your reply to my paper/posting. You are the type of person I am looking for. Because of my workload, overtime for 31 years, I couldn't respond immediately. Permit me to do so now. Your words are marked by an arrow....> My printing is not. Also I have made a copy of your posting and a CD backup, so you cannot say that I an making your response up of whole cloth. Also web pages are time/date stamped.

Regarding the bolded material: You couldn't have just quoted him instead of using the '> ' format?

Item number 4. Using rad waste casks to manufacture fresh water from salt water, in Death Valley. According to all the unsubstantiated gossip I have been hearing over the years, the state of California is a drop or two short of fresh water, among other things. Seeing as how Death Valley is 198 feet below sea level, it would be a matter of simple physics to run a pipeline from the Pacific ocean to the valley and fill it with sea water. No pump would be needed, as gravity would provide all the siphon action that would be needed. A solar powered desalinating plant could be built at the site to provide distilled water to the rest of the state, and neighboring states. Also, a turbo generator could be placed in the pipeline to generate electricity as a by-product. It would be a simple matter to use conical mirrors to generate all of the heat that you would want, to boil all of the water that you would want, to obtain all of the distilled water that you would want.... And at night, the rad waste casks would take over in place of the sun.
By the way, here is an added bonus.... And a riddle. When I said the water could be delivered to neighboring states, this could be done for free, ignoring the pipeline costs, by using gravity, and ram pumps. Do you know what I am describing? I don't think too many people know what a ram pump is.

You're correct that I don't know what a ram pump is...the image your phrase brings to my mind is ramjet. I haven't looked into it, and am not likely to do so, because your idea isn't likely to be accepted politically for various reasons. Once upon a time, the United States Government liked the idea of harnessing nature to serve mankind. From what I've heard, Franklin Roosevelt called the area the Colorado river covered before the Hoover Dam was built a 'cactus-covered waste'. (I'm working from memory here; that's the gist of the statement, not an actual quote.) Now, however, many politicians, especially those who are part of or connected with the 'Green' movement, would refuse to make any such changes, and some are actively working to undo what mankind has done to shape the nation's landscape for his needs. There is no way on earth they would allow your 'Death Valley Still' to go into effect. Not only because it would 'harm the environment', but because you are proposing to use it to generate energy from the drop as well...from the statements I've read, many prominent 'Green' activists think that the idea of giving the American people access to more energy would be a disaster.

Item number 5. Reducing the amount of transmission towers, and related weather and maintainance problems to them. As you well know, it costs big bucks to transmit power from one place to another. A large amount of this power is used to keep buildings warm in cold weather. Centrally located bundles of rad waste casks could be located near cities to pipe steam to large buildings. This would reduce the loads on large transmission lines. Va rations of this concept have already been tried. For example: The Ford auto plant in Detroit had its own coal fired power plant. In emergences, the plant was able to supply the city with power, when the city had power problems with its own power systems.

Exactly how would you get people to live with Rad Waste of any sort near them? I'll admit, from what I've read, it wouldn't be as bad as most people make it out to be, but you're still going up against that neocultural prejudice.

And while I am at it, the power companies could do a better job in designing high voltage transmission towers. It seems to me that with a slight design change, the same transmission towers could also support an anemometer type of windmill. For those of you who don't know what an anemometer is, it looks like three ping pong balls cut in half on three rods, rotating on a vertical axis, turning a generator. In other words, it would be very easy to build transmission towers to move power from one place to another, and generate power at the same time. Why haven't the power companies thought of this?

What would happen to the power flow between the two? If you're transmitting across the lines and generating at the same time, I'd suspect serious magnetic interference with both. Either that, or the tower's generator would have to be removed to a location distant enough from the lines to make the connecting rod/cable a weak point in the idea. And as I stated above, the 'Green' movement would probably find some reason to act against you because you're trying to provide more power.

Somehow you didn't get the jist of that part of my paper. I don't know why. Steam does not cool in pipes quickly. Example: And please excuse my wit. Let us say that you wish to take a shower, and wish to wash the filth/fleas/maggots/scum off of your uneducated body. You turn on the hot valve in the shower, and wait one minute while the hot water gets to the showerhead. At this point you must turn on the cold water valve, to get the proper temperature mix that suites you. The hot water does not cool off in the pipe before it gets to you, does it? Live superheated steam is much more active. Superheated steam typically travels through in a pipe at over one hundred miles per hour. The steam heats the pipe much faster than other forces can cool it off. Every country in the world, including the U.S., uses underground steam pipes to transmit heat to buildings in a circular area of a steam plant. This is more efficient than using electricity to do the same task, as energy is wasted in any conversion process. You might remember the steam pipe that ruptured in New York, after being in continuous service for ninety years! Also, why would a nuke plant need those massive cooling towers, if the excess steam cooled off before it gets there.

What'll happen to the surroundings if a pipe bursts? If the stuff within is still superheated steam, then it'll do some damage when it comes out. And no longer being in the pipe, it will neither flow along, nor would I think it could continue to hold its heat once it has the area atmosphere to radiate in.

AT ANY RATE, if you wait to process the core by at least 25 years or more, most of the rad-waste will decay, and make reprocessing much easier.

Zuh? Exactly what type of Rad Waste are you referring to here? I'd originally thought you meant reactor byproducts, but from what I've read, the most volatile of those (halflife ages within the range you just described as 'most' disappearing in) never leave the reactor simply because they decay so fast.

Regarding lines b and c. Wrong! High voltage lines are strung to make the most efficient use of power distribution from the plant to the city. Power plants don't pay for the land for the power towers, they use the government to annex the land, and then string the wire.

Thus proving that the most effective form of monopoly is the governmental monopoly.

Regarding lines c and d. Wrong! You don't want a flywheel effect! You waste power to pump up a flywheel. That's why the blades are made of fiberglass. And there is no heavy steel or lead flywheel anywhere on the windmill. Or any windmill. Mail me a picture of a windmill with a flywheel on it.

He didn't say there was an added flywheel, he said the blades themselves are acting as one.

Regarding lines d through h, it is total drivel. Number 1. You didn't read my paper carefully. What I wrote was using an anemometer type windmill. I will repeat. An anemometer type of windmill, looks like 3 ping pong balls cut in half, on a vertical axis, to catch the wind. These units work in winds of 1 mile per hour or more. These wind speeds exist all over the world.

Please point out to me where this kind of mill has gone into use. I've seen anemometers used as wind-speed gauges before, but every mill I've seen in reality and in pictures has a standing fan-blade appearance.

As far as an power tower/poles eyesore goes....WRONG! Correct me if I am wrong, but the pole next to your house is still there. You might not like the looks of it, but you will not saw it down, because you like the power it supplies.

And also probably because you'd get into legal trouble for doing so. But you're working off of a misunderstanding here...we're not referring to already-standing poles, but to hypothetical new developments. And those could be quashed for aesthetic reasons.

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better yet, terminate him with extreme prejudice together with his followers and remove a major source of hot air and carbon dioxide...

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Nah, better idea. Simply force them to live under the exact conditions they wish to enforce on others. See how long it takes them to break.

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All politicians produce carbon dioxide and hot air.

Maybe we need a BIG containment dome around Washington DC, to keep hot air, carbon dioxide, and excess taxation and regulation from escaping.

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Luckily, typing out of one's butt does not produce the same hot air or carbon dioxide, so internet arguments can continue unabated :)

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All politicians produce carbon dioxide and hot air.

Maybe we need a BIG containment dome around Washington DC, to keep hot air, carbon dioxide, and excess taxation and regulation from escaping.

Leave a screened in ventilation point somewhere. That way we can use the hot air for our own purposes, and maybe it'll help keep the excessive regulations from leaving on the wind.

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Is the sudden attention of our moronic press to the death of a small number of coal miners a product of global warming?

This topic has been dead for over six months. Start a new discussion instead.
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