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I am an Electronics and Communication Engineering graduate and have now joined into the Electrical Engineering and Computer Science Engineering branch of a university to pursue my Masters. I need to pick a course this quarter and I'm stuck with a problem.

I have the following options:
Operating Systems
Computer Architecture
Introduction to Databases

I am more interested towards Computer Networking. I can choose only one from the above courses. I heard the operating systems course involves a lot of C under Unix programming and as I'm from an Electronics background, I'm a little confused whether to take up this course or not. And as I'm not interested in Computer Architecture, I'm not sure if I want to take it. The Introduction to Databases is something I think I'm interested in but don't know if it'll be of any use to me. What do you think I should be choosing?

PS: I had Operating Systems in my undergraduation but I was always dissatisfied the way it was taught in the class. Except for reading a textbook we haven't done anything special and thats what is scaring me. And I never coded in the Unix environment, so that is the thing that worries me the most. Please advice.

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Last Post by Ancient Dragon
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    [quote=Lardmeister;438672]I know this is a little late, but if you live in the US, switch to law and join the money making crowd. In your present technical field you will always be just a peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.[/quote] If you are the best, nothing … Read More

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I advise Databases. I could use databases for a number of things where I work if I understood how they worked. I too am in the networking field.

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operating systems and computer architecture might be very interesting, but not usefull to your field. I agree with Duki, i'd take databases, as that will probably help you more.

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Thanks a lot... I chose Intro to Databases... I think going by my interests is much better... I don't want to end up taking risks at this stage. In a scenario where you had to choose between Operating Systems and Computer Architecture, which would you have chosen keeping my field in mind? Just curious thats it...

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>In a scenario where you had to choose between Operating Systems and Computer
>Architecture, which would you have chosen keeping my field in mind?
It really depends on what the operating systems class covers. Most likely it's going to be steeped in theory and minute details of OS design and implementation. While these are interesting topics, they're probably not going to be practical for you. On the other hand, computer architecture is likely to cover fundamental concepts that every technical professional should know.

My advice would be the same as Duki's: Go with the databases class because it has the greatest chance of giving you something useful after you graduate. The second choice would be computer architecture because of the core concepts that you'll learn. For the field you're interested in, I don't think operating systems would be more than a dalliance.

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I know this is a little late, but if you live in the US, switch to law and join the money making crowd. In your present technical field you will always be just a peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.

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>In your present technical field you will always be just a
>peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.
This has to be the most ignorant comment I've seen all day, and I deal with some pretty ignorant folks.

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>In your present technical field you will always be just a
>peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.
This has to be the most ignorant comment I've seen all day, and I deal with some pretty ignorant folks.

Well, the day is still young. What makes you the expert and what stuff are you on? Love your avatar, looks good for Halloween!

Why do you old folks always have to insult us young folks?

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that was a pretty lame comment, lardmeister. A computer science major, going out of college will start at an average salary of 70,000 a year, with a BS. Master and a PhD will get $100,000 to $120,000 a year. Even lawyers don't start out at that, so how will you competing against programmers in india? how much to they make like $5 an hour?

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that was a pretty lame comment, lardmeister. A computer science major, going out of college will start at an average salary of 70,000 a year, with a BS. Master and a PhD will get $100,000 to $120,000 a year. Even lawyers don't start out at that, so how will you competing against programmers in india? how much to they make like $5 an hour?

My point, why would an employer keep hiring folks at such inflated pay levels, if he/she can get the same job done for $5 an hour in India? Distance wouldn't mean much on the internet.

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you know, that's taking advantage of them. And it's true many companies do hire a lot of programmers from abroad, but there's something about hiring a programmer here. I don't know, but there is a demand for computer scientists now.

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>Well, the day is still young.
This is true. Maybe TkTkorrovi will decide to come back later this evening. Or Mister C from cprogramming.com will make an appearance shortly and try to debate the intricacies of undefined behavior with me. But until then, you hold the crown.

>What makes you the expert and what stuff are you on?
The expert on what? Insulting technical professionals, Indians, and Chinese? Your statement lacked the detailed information necessary to keep it from being a bigoted flame.

>Why do you old folks always have to insult us young folks?
By young and old I'll assume you mean how long we've been on Daniweb. To answer that, I'm an equal opportunist. I'll insult whomever deserves it, regardless of seniority or station. Dani can verify that, as she's been on the receiving end of my sharp tongue once or twice.

>My point, why would an employer keep hiring folks at such inflated pay levels, if he/she
>can get the same job done for $5 an hour in India? Distance wouldn't mean much on the internet.
And what makes you the expert? Apparently you haven't ever done any research on the real costs of outsourcing and fell prey to the hype. The upfront cost is almost always obscene, and after a few years, the final savings aren't nearly what you're suggesting. Sure, there are savings if it's done right, but often companies end up losing those savings in support and maintenance costs. I've seen quite a few ventures end up spending more by outsourcing than if they paid those "inflated" salaries for local resources.

So before you shoot your mouth off, maybe you should do some reading.

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not that it counts anymore in the geek's lounge, but.... EQUALIZERRRR
MEAN COMMENTS
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I know this is a little late, but if you live in the US, switch to law and join the money making crowd. In your present technical field you will always be just a peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.

#1
I always like to go by something one of my favorite teachers said to me; if you do what you love you'll never work a day in your life. If computers is what someone is interested in, you think they would rather begin a career in law for a few extra bucks? I wouldn't.

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The surplus in attorneys is ridiculous right now. My Economics teacher has a degree in law and said he is making more as a college professor working 20 hours a week, 30 weeks a year than if he were working as an attorney 40hr/week 50weeks/yr. That says something.

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I know this is a little late, but if you live in the US, switch to law and join the money making crowd. In your present technical field you will always be just a peon competing with low paid labor from India or China.

If you are the best, nothing prevents you from being what you want to be / achieving what you want. Of course, if someone is a lazy potato who somehow manages to get a 'engineering' degree by stealing someone elses' work, he deserves to be a peon.

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riiiiiiiiight!
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SOS is right! You can find peons in every field of endeavour. That goes from a farmer, teacher, soldier, priest, scientist all the way to a country's leader.

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@Duki:
My dad's a lawyer, he enjoys it and is doing very well!

BTW, he is still chuckling about naru's comment about her sharp womanly tongue!

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Oh boy... For a second, I was just checking the Topic Title to see if this was the same one I posted earlier. I never imagined a simple "What subject to choose?" question would lead to a big debate. :)

Anyways, I don't think I have the right experience to comment on anything but given a choice to choose between something that I love and something in which I can make lots of money, I would choose something that I love and master that to make lots of money in it. I simply don't see a life in seeing myself working in a field that I don't like. I am not saying I don't like law or something but well, I've been for years in computers and technology that it seems hard to let go of everything just to make a few extra bucks. I'd say there are pros and cons for every field out there. If you get more money, maybe you're taking more stress unless you are some really exceptional genius who can solve problems in seconds :)

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Oh boy... For a second, I was just checking the Topic Title to see if this was the same one I posted earlier. I never imagined a simple "What subject to choose?" question would lead to a big debate. :)

Anyways, I don't think I have the right experience to comment on anything but given a choice to choose between something that I love and something in which I can make lots of money, I would choose something that I love and master that to make lots of money in it. I simply don't see a life in seeing myself working in a field that I don't like. I am not saying I don't like law or something but well, I've been for years in computers and technology that it seems hard to let go of everything just to make a few extra bucks. I'd say there are pros and cons for every field out there. If you get more money, maybe you're taking more stress unless you are some really exceptional genius who can solve problems in seconds :)

I really like your thinking! I just wanted to present alternatives, not force them on you! May you be successful and happy with your choices!

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#1
I always like to go by something one of my favorite teachers said to me; if you do what you love you'll never work a day in your life. If computers is what someone is interested in, you think they would rather begin a career in law for a few extra bucks? I wouldn't.

#2
The surplus in attorneys is ridiculous right now. My Economics teacher has a degree in law and said he is making more as a college professor working 20 hours a week, 30 weeks a year than if he were working as an attorney 40hr/week 50weeks/yr. That says something.

Maybe he just is a bad lawyer? It's been my experience that people get jobs outside of their degrees either because they fell in love with an industry too late (i.e. after school) or because they aren't good enough to make it in what they have a degree in. It sounds like your teacher would rather be an attorney than an economics teacher, and a really awesome attorney can make it no matter what - it's just a matter of being good enough to shine through the competition.

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Maybe he just is a bad lawyer? It's been my experience that people get jobs outside of their degrees either because they fell in love with an industry too late (i.e. after school) or because they aren't good enough to make it in what they have a degree in.

Could also be some people just get bored with their profession and want a change (burnout).

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I apologize for deviating a little bit but I thought even this question is appropriate under this post. There is a small situation that confuses me:

1. I was issued an I20 (Document of Duration of Stay) for my Masters degree for 9 months. Most of my seniors told me that I cannot complete it in 9 months and that I should be extending it further. I need to have 12 credits to complete my Masters. So taking 3 credits a quarter (my university has a quarter system), it would take 3*4 quarters to complete all the 12 credits requirement. So logically speaking I will be completing my course in 12 months but as this includes a summer, I should be doing an internship, so it'll take 15 months to complete my course. All is well. Is that right or did I miscalculate it somewhere?

2. I saw two options: Masters with thesis and Masters without thesis. I know "Which one is better?" is a silly question but I'd really like to know the difference between them and how it would affect my future...

3. If suppose, I take up Masters with thesis, would I still be completing my course in 15 months or will it be extended further down the lane? And I heard from a friend that I should be "sponsored" by my professor to complete my thesis. Is that right?

I'm really sorry about the questions but I'm in a small confusion. Hope someone clarifies.

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>>I'd really like to know the difference between them and how it would affect my future
Furure employers could care less which you choose, so pick the one YOU like best and the one that will give you the best grade(s). As for your other questions you have to talk to your school consolers.

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