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I was hoping someone could help me with this embarassing question. I am a 27 year old currently going to school for a CIS dgree. At the age of 20 I was arrested for possession of marijuana with intent to sell and became a convicted felon. My question is: Am I wasting my time getting this degree because my conviction will keep me from getting hired? Does anyone know of other's in this similiar position? I have an excellent GPA and am no longer involved with any illegal activity of any kind. I was a young kid who made a stupid decision. My thinking is that a felon with a degree has a better chance at a job than a felon without one. Any feedback would be appreciated.

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Last Post by cmckean
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Depends almost entirely upon the company doing the hiring. Some might not give you a chance because of the personal beliefs of the boss/board or the nature of the business they are in, others might adopt a take as they find approach, others might be impressed by the drive of a candidate who has turned his life around and wants to make something of it...

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I don't think there's ever a good reason not to better yourself when you have the opportunity.

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Welcome! I agree with all of them, go for it and yes it does make sense, a felon with a degree has a better chance than a felon without one.
Good Luck!

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Welcome to Daniweb :)

You have hopefully come a long way since then right??

That wont be overlooked im sure,give it a try.... YOU MIGHT SUCCEED!

Good luck :)

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I think the major advantage of a well-rounded education is the comprehensive knowledge and life experience received, not just an individual's increased employment prosepects in any specific field. With your degree, you'll be in a good position to build relationships for independent business ventures of your own.

You may start out small, professionally speaking, while working for someone else's firm, but there's no reason you can't set a goal of being a business owner down the road and work toward it. Remember, virtually nobody achieves real financial independence working for someone else's company.

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So I know this is old, but still....I too am a felon who has moved forward in my career. I was 25 when I was convicted of things I did when I was 22. I went back to school, got my Bachelors, then a Masters, and now moving forward with my doctoral. I am not in the IT field; however, I work very closely with those that are. I cannot say I have anyone with a felony in the IT field, yet I have met plenty of people who messed up, convicted, and then moved forward.
The biggest thing is to be honest. The length of time is huge no matter what people say. Most applications to even get an interview ask if you have been convicted in the last 7 years, therefore, you must take the educational leap to show the improvement you have made.
Trust me when I say, an organization would rather hire a mature person with a degree, dispite a felony (if the felony occurred long ago) rather a person whom just got a degree and no life experience.
I have never been asked about my felony, nor have I been asked to explain myself, except when tried to get a fingerprint clearance card for teaching. I still got the card even though I have a Federal and State felony, but I was honest and it wasn't as serious as many felonies might be. Mine was stolen mail and cashing bad checks.......either way, you have a chance with a degree, but don't stop at a bachelor.....give yourself some headway with a Masters just to prove your abilities and personal goals.

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So I know this is old, but still....I too am a felon who has moved forward in my career. I was 25 when I was convicted of things I did when I was 22. I went back to school, got my Bachelors, then a Masters, and now moving forward with my doctoral. I am not in the IT field; however, I work very closely with those that are. I cannot say I have anyone with a felony in the IT field, yet I have met plenty of people who messed up, convicted, and then moved forward.
The biggest thing is to be honest. The length of time is huge no matter what people say. Most applications to even get an interview ask if you have been convicted in the last 7 years, therefore, you must take the educational leap to show the improvement you have made.
Trust me when I say, an organization would rather hire a mature person with a degree, dispite a felony (if the felony occurred long ago) rather a person whom just got a degree and no life experience.
I have never been asked about my felony, nor have I been asked to explain myself, except when tried to get a fingerprint clearance card for teaching. I still got the card even though I have a Federal and State felony, but I was honest and it wasn't as serious as many felonies might be. Mine was stolen mail and cashing bad checks.......either way, you have a chance with a degree, but don't stop at a bachelor.....give yourself some headway with a Masters just to prove your abilities and personal goals.

this is great to hear! I am just about to finish my bachelor's and have been concerned about the felony barring me from doing what I'd like to do. I'm sure I will have some problems (since mine is apparently not able to be expunged) but I'm going to try and find a way to improve my standing with the law somehow. if I had known that 10 years later I'd still be dragging this around I wouldn't have done it! I'm kinda afraid that I'll be perpetually 19... )sigh(

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I think that going to college and earning skills that are valuable to employer's is the best thing you could ever do during the rehabilitation process. Self improvement is a good quality for a person to have, especially in our economy.
We take something natural like marijuana and make it illegal. In the meanwhile we produce products far more dangerous. Alcohol,tobacco and pharmaceutical should be illegal not something as petty as marijuana.
I never did agree with our system and I think that is part of the reason I am a felon.

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