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Last Post by vegaseat
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How do I choose? I am lucky enough to live is Seattle and I eat Thai, Vietnamese, Chineese, Korean, Italian, Indian, Ethiopian, Montanan, American, I love it all. I only eat French food in France though -- there is nothing like sitting down to a meal with friends and family and eating and talking and drinking wine for 3 or more hours. The emply plates are removed and new courses are served with no interuption in conversation and no one is waiting impatiently for you to leave -- when you make a reservation, the table is yours. They invented restaurants in France - back when the all the royalty was executed, 1000s of chefs were thrown out of work and they had to invent a new concept, the restaurant. Before, food was always an afterthought - ie the place where you slept also served food or the bar where you drank also served food.

Ethiopian and Morrocan food is served on one large platter and everyone eats using bread and fingers.

When we lived in Tucson AZ, my wife and I would drive across the border into Mexico to buy cheap tequilla and eat tacos fried on street corner grills - later we drove deep into mexico (ciudad Chihuahua) to visit Poncho Villa's Villa (heh,heh) and see La Cucaracha (full of bullet holes from his assassination) and eat Mexican that was more like French because of Emporer Maximillion's influence.

We would go up into Canada and eat hamburgers Canadian style (cut them up with a knife and fork) I remember the good old days when you could walk into a Canadian store with a $20 bill buy a 6-pack of beer and they they would give you $20 in change (the exchange rate was 30%, beer was CA$6.00 - US$20 was worth CA$26 - now they are par or CA$ are worth more -- hasn't George done wonders for our economy?).

I have eaten Australian food (pretty much like american but more 'roo meat) Figian (lots of pork, pineapple and fresh fruit and a very strange drink that was sort of numbing and tasted nasty but was traditionally shared with visitors and you shouted something that sounded much like 'Mutha' as you drank).

Food in London was pretty much boiled (shut up and drink your beer before it gets cold) and kidney tastes and smells just like you would expect kidneys to.

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My favorite is Chinese combo fried rice. My least is Greek and I've never eaten anything specifically from India or Ireland (I don't think so anyway).

I see someone voted USA -- the only things I can think of that are specifically American are pot stew and maybe McDonalds. Although very popular here pizza was invented in Italy and popularized in Naples.

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Well...caribbean food for me (other)...it's rather diverse...because the caribbean has people from all other the world...europe, NA, east asia, india ect...we have a lot going on. Jerk Chicken, curry, the soups are quite popular...can't forget the sunday evening dinner without a bottle of caribbean rum.

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Actually, I prefer Caribbean cuisine to others I've tried. Particularly from Jamaica and Trinidad.

EDIT: Actually, the Trinidadian food I like are actually somewhat imported from India, so...

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I voted Amercan food, because I love steak (beef or salmon), potatoes, corn, squash and the like. Not much into typical fast food!

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I am with you there, love Irish stew made from browned lamb, potatoes, onions, a shot of whisky, some parsley and spices! mmmmmm! Goes well with a glass of Guinness stout with a nice thick creamy head.

Of course on St. Patricks Day it has to be green beer and a steamy plate of corned beef and cabbage.

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>> green beer
And you started off so well with you talk of the stew, albeit a weak stew (:)), green beer... not an Irish thing. Frankly it looks not nice, IMO.

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Are you sure you are Irish? In the good old USA everybody with Irish blood flowing in their veins, or living in a mildly Irish neighborhood, drinks green beer to honor St. Patrick on March 17!

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I'm fairly sure I am... I mean no Irish living in Ireland do it. The ones living away clearly have to go the extra mile to boast their patriotism, I guess. Either that or it's cheap... is it subsidised?

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Yeah Irish!
I think it is regular and good beer with some green food coloring added, just a fun way to feel Irish away from home and get stoned! You guys at home have the green island to look at.

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My hometown is loaded with Italian restaurants, I am surprised no one has voted Italy yet!

Most of those treaded frozen TV dinners are some kind of Italian fare. Quite a turn-off!

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cant say i have a favourite country but i might say the netherlands.

we in south africa inherrited a lot from them and one thing in some regions and cultures is (or maybe was in case they have changed in the meantime) the act of relying on the foods natural flavour and taste.

the easiest way to put me off my food is to throw in a handfull of spice which completely hides the original taste or add some sauce which makes it soggy.

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Our neighbours are from South Africa and they wrap a lot of their food, like sausages and almond paste, into a blanket of dough.

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I live in the Southwest of the USA, but really don't like Southwest food, it's just too spicy for my taste. My mother was Swiss, so I am used to meat and noodle dishes, probably with a French accent.

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Our neighbours are from South Africa and they wrap a lot of their food, like sausages and almond paste, into a blanket of dough.

south africa is both multiracial and multicultural. you will find different foods in different ethnic groups or even within the same ethnic group in different parts of the country. that style of preparing food, which i had described, only occurs in some sections of the population.

for example. the people of cape town cant eat half a plate of rice without adding so much curry and whatever else you could, discounting the nutrients of course, just as well have dranked a pitcher of liquid curry.

@vegaseat

i like noodles too. sometimes i eat at my girlfriend and she often make it into a stirfry with vegatables and fish.

the other way i like it is plain with what i think americans call a greek salad and any kind of animal food except pork.

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In the US, we also have Soul Food or Southern Cooking:

Soul Food originated from slaves' diet. For vegetables slaves used basically plants that were in those days considered weeds like collard greens, kale, cress, mustard, and pokeweed. Their recipes used discarded meat from the plantation, such as pig’s feet, beef tongue or tail, ham hocks, chitterlings (pig small intestines), pig ears, hog jowls, tripe and skin. Cooks added onions, garlic, thyme, and bay leaf to enhance the flavors.

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I love greek & lebonese food (the kind you get in a decent restaurant not in a cafeteria or from a truck on the side of the road).

I'm surprised noone has mentioned Japanese food yet, sushi is devine and I'm quite partial to the seaweed salads as well. Only down side is the deserts (beans should never be considered a desert dish).

Italian is good value but not fine dining for me, typically one resaurant serving of pasta is enough for two meals.

I also enjoy Morroccan (well spiced but not hot) but I usually end up make it myself because there are very few restaurants specializing in it.

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I like spicy food.I listed some favourite food names and country.

Gazpacho-Spain
Tortilla Española-spain
Hawayij -Saudi Arabia
Haysa Al-Tumreya-Saudi Arabia
Grated Carrot, Apple, and Raisin Salad -Australia
Black Australian Coffee -Australia

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It's Oktoberfest time, the time for a good bratwurst, grilled chicken, radish, potato salad, all washed down with a stein full of beer.

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