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Hello dear MAC users !

I'm developing few web sites and I have specific problems when I'm trying to see if it works with different platform, especially with MAC. It seems that when I'm making a link to big file (in those case, vrml and file maker pro) more than 2 MB it doesn't work. With a PC it opens a small box asking if we want to download the file (for the fp7 file format) or open the the file correctly for the vrml file. But with the MAC I have tried, it opens an other browser window with thousand of code lines...

For example, I don't know if anyone would like to try it, here's my website address :

http://callisto.si.usherb.ca/~01192480/paestum/

Sorry it is in french, so here's what to do !! Click on "Visiter la dernière version VRML du temple d'Athéna", you then need for sure the Cortona plug-in to continue, and "continuer la visite" when the plug-in is correctly install. You should then see a magnificient (!) greek temple. But it happens that with a MAC (well the four I have tried !) I had a new browser window with all the lines of the VRML code instead of the 3d temple... It's really weird because when I do the same with a smaller version (500 Ko instead of 7 Mb) it ...works !!! What's the problem !! Is there any limit that a MAC can support for downloading a file ?!!?

And I have the same problem with the "file maker pro" file on an other site I'm making. Clicking on the link to download the file and I have a new browser window with code instead of downloading the file...bizzz :rolleyes: !

Plaese help ! Thanks a lot !

Mathieu

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Last Post by kc0arf
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What you'll probably want to do is make a copy of the file available as a BinHex (*.hqx) format for Mac users. They can then download the file, then decompress it using Stuffit Expander, and then view the file.

That's one of the old nuances to a Mac, I don't know if it applies to OS X systems. The files are stored in two "forks"-- a resource fork and a data fork. To a non-Mac system, this looks often like two files. For any files you want to send to a Mac, you might want to BinHex it using Stuffit, just so all of the file's attributes are preserved.

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Hello,

Apple is moving away from the forked file system to be more inline with the Unix cousins (Darwin). Yes, make the file a binhex one, as that is the standard (a la zip for the Windoze people). Binhex is pure text: it will survive email, ftp, and web transfer just fine.

You can find binhexing utilities out there; my favorite was Compact Pro, a shareware utility that for whatever reason just faded away a bit. It would make tighter files faster than Stuffit in that day and age.

Christian

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