GuyClapperton 12 Staff Writer

Social networking site [URL="http://www.twitter.com"]Twitter[/URL] has found a new application - according to research from [URL="http://www.hp.com"]HP[/URL] the movies that get talked about the most are likely to be the biggest hits.

That's not exactly what the HP release says, of course. It talks about measurement, it talks about accuracy and it talks about the uncanniness of its forecasts based on the amount of Twitter traffic for a particular film.

The substance, though, is that the more people talk about a movie, the better it's likely to do at the Box Office.

Call me old-fashioned but I could probably have guessed that. And I'd have charged a lot less than senior researchers at a major technology company.

GuyClapperton 12 Staff Writer

Kazaa has decided to join Pirate Bay in becoming a legal peer to peer service. This raises interesting questions for moralistic pedants like me.

The full details of the story are [URL="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8159560.stm"]here[/URL] but that's not what I want to discuss. I'm more interested in what sort of message it sends out when people start off a business that's completely illegal by any amount of reckoning and are then effectively rewarded.

Actually 'rewarded' might be putting it a bit strongly. The companies are wound up, declared bankrupt and the owners held up to public ridicule. It's just that so many of them seem to come back as legitimate businesses - Napster being the first, or at least the first since all those DJs on Radio Caroline became big stars (British reference, sorry).

It was Charles Dickens who once said "The Law Is A Ass", becoming one of the most misquoted phrases in literature in the process. But if the law is going to declare things illegal which then become thriving businesses within years and on the side of the establishment, it's never been truer.

GuyClapperton 12 Staff Writer

Word has reached us in the UK that there is some sort of election happening in the US. In fact it has been happening for an incredibly long time, with one of the candidates in particular making more premature victory speeches (although not to Americans, I mean, they're only the people who get a vote) than anyone in the history of the known universe.

OK, OK, I'm being cynical. But the Democrats are having their convention this week and all the smart newswires are saying how involved people are with the electronic side of things this time around. It's truly impressive. What's more, young people will be able to vote through the Xbox Live community (it's not that old people like me at 43 wouldn't be allowed, we just wouldn't have a clue where to start).

I wonder, then, whether everybody's read [URL="http://voices.washingtonpost.com/the-trail/2008/08/21/ohio_voting_machines_contained.html"]this[/URL] - a summary of how a leading electronic voting system in America has been dropping votes for ten years but it's OK, a spokesman says, because he's confident someone would have noticed.

Well that's all right, then. Kind of.

jsepeta commented: has nothing to do with the forum where it was posted. +0