1

Wowsers! Cannot use a VM to accomplish this.

The following I haven't tried, but is the approach I would take:

Format the drive completely empty. Install each Linux to it's own partition, and keep track of which one was done first. I would do Ubuntu first, then OpenSUSE, and then Fedora. Make sure you do an advanced install, or at least have the option to customize your hard drive layout. Each one would only need to be say 20 GB in size... Have the Fedora partition write to the master boot record.

Once everything is installed, you should be able to either run a rescue / repair disk, or boot knoppix, and edit the /boot/grub/grub.conf and define each bootable partition. Make some meaningful descriptions. You will need to do this if you
install Windoze last, as it will clobber anything that grub setup.

Next, you need to edit your grub.conf file to ensure each partition is properly listed. Note the root (hd0,1) area... that is hard disk 0, partition 1. You will need an entry for each linux version (hd0,1) (0,2) (0,3) but properly aligned.

My /boot/grub/grub.conf has these lines:

title Fedora (version)
root (hd0,1)
kernel <bunch of stuff>

title Looze XP
rootnoverify (hd0,0)
chainloader +1

1

Hello,

It might be time to look at a dedicated server, either a Linux box with Samba, or a true Windows 2000 / 2003 Server. Why? Because workgroup sharing only allows 10 connections at a time, and with 15 at your location, you will run into a problem running out of connections available. You should also be considering the management of the workstations in terms of patches and updates. If you put together a server, consider SUS to do that for you.

Also remember that there are differences between share permissions and NTFS permissions. Make sure you configure them properly.

As you recently took this position over, I would also check the backup scheme, and make sure that things are working properly. Do some sample restores too.

Christian

Votes + Comments
Great Advice, Little things like that have the capacity to grow into Great things, he may take the oportunity to make real improvements, and save himself a lot of work in the future, MartyMcFly
1

Hello,

First, I need to disclaim that I have never run XP Home before, and my XP Pro / 2000 Pro ideas might not apply to XP Home.

A device driver would fail to initialize because the driver is calling upon hardware that doesn't exist, or is not configured properly. The device drivers are special pieces of code that expect certain components to be there in order to function.

Think of a computer that operates a traffic light. The computer turns the lights on -- red, yellow, green. The hardware is the lightbulb. The software is the program that turns on the light, and checks for power drain (a lit light draws power to make the shine, and gives off heat). If the lightbulb is missing, you don't have light, and there would not be a power drain. Software says there is a problem. Driver did not initialize properly.

Chipset drivers are a newer thing to motherboards, beyond what we call BIOS. Chipset drivers are used to configure special pieces of hardware and software on the motherboard. The chipset software controls things like the PCI bus, the floppy disk buss, memory management, maybe the parallel port, USB devices. You might need to go to motherboard manufacturer's website and download some software that will help your motherboard out.

What kind of network card do you have? Take a look at it. See if you can find the model number. Go to a website for the manufacture, and download the latest driver. ...

Votes + Comments
good info
1

Hi,

You may use the linux box, with 2 network cards in it, to be your gateway to the internet world.

If you are running apache on the Linux box, there is a section there that you can configure what ports / ip numbers you would like apache to "listen" for requests. Simply specify the LAN IP (inside) address and port... the software willl then ignore requests on the internet (WAN) side. You can also control this via a firewall on the linux box... just block port 80 on the firewall, or have a re-direct to send port 80 somewhere else.

My RedHat 9 box is my router, webserver, dns server, email thing, and a bunch of other things running on it. 550 MHz computer with 3 network cards in it. I prefer it to a store-bought "wireless router". I know that Cisco products will route FASTER, but this is a home network, and I do not need that kind of performance.

Christian

1

Hello,

While some might argue that the movies "Deep Impact" and "Armegeddon" may be science fiction, I do think the threat is real that some rock out there could come and hit us. I also find it disturbing that if you are younger than 30 years of age, you were not alive when the last man walked on the moon.

I can only wonder what kind of job creation possibilities we could have here in the US if we got the Space program off the ground, and returned to the moon, or worked to design a system to protect the fragile Earth from devistating encounters.

I suppose we have to stop fighting ourselves in the Middle East, eh?

Christian

2

Hello,

Well, it appears that Micro$oft has figured out your dilemma... and offers great student discounts to Office. But if you are a company upgrading Office, the costs are huge.

I love the idea of Open Source software, such as OpenOffice. I use that whenever I can. But I aso went out and purchased some software at home for my Mac OS X computer.

I like the idea of online demos, or software with expiration dates on it, so that you can get the feel of the product before you buy the complete version.

You will find certain companies like QUARK thata extort tooth and nail for unstable crappy software. Just go read their online forums if you do not believe me. The stuff is just not good. You will also find companies like Apple that will have a moderately priced bulk license for their OS, such as the Family OS X (5 user) license for $150 or something like that. You will also find companies like AutoDesk that have ridiculous registration / authorization technique that doesn't work 1/2 the time, and you loose money waiting on the phone for them to get you a proper license key.

Christian

1

Hello,

To answer your question Technically:

Email recipt (your laptop going to get it) is handled on TCP/IP Port 110... if you are using what is called a POP3 email server. Usually, those ports are open all around to go and get email.

Email transmission (your laptop sending it) is handled on TCP/IP Port 25, and with the advent of spam and the technical efforts to control it, there are a lot of locked down ports, and IP number checkings that occur before it is deemed that the email is trusted to be sent.

As many can tell, these efforts are fruitless, as spam keeps on getting more and more, and legitimate uses of email servers have been stomped out.

Technically, you will need to find the legitimate email server for the network he is on.

Now, let's work with the Political and Social answer:

You are stealing. Either he or his ISP could come after you for theft of information. You are coming in on his network, and unfirewalled, and who knows what else he is exposing to you. I would also argue that since you know that you are doing this that it is a poor reflection of your character to willingly use his connection and not seek permission.

Go have a talk with him. He might ask you to help defray the costs, or you might end up cutting his grass or something along those lines. Do not try to work around the situation, as if he ...

1

Hello,

What version of OS X are youo working with? Are you working with strictly OS X software, or is there some classic in there too?

Typically you enable most fonts onto your system so that they are readily available at any time.

It is also a very bad idea to manipulate fonts while programs are open. Could cause problems doing that. Best close everything down first.

Christian

2

Hello,

I am a Firefox and Safari user. For some reason, Firefox and Fox news do not get along too well on my Macintosh OS X platform. SO I safari the news page. No big deal to me on that one.

For entering bank numbers and that, you should be checking to see that you have an encrypted connection to the website... look for a little lock symbol on the lower right hand corner of your browser. If you are not "locked" you are transmitting in the clear anyways.

And to the folks asking if there is any sure-fire completely secure system.... there is... it is a formatted computer inside of a concrete bunker with no electrical cords, and a hard drive with a nail going through it. Less sarcastically, any system that is useful to people will ahve some risk. The goal is to limit that risk.

CHristian

1

Hello,

I suggest that you talk to your Dean at your college then, as I am sure you have already gone to your professor and asked questions in class. If the Dean is unresponsive, then you are not getting your money's worth at your institution.

Coding C++ requires knowledge of the header files, and you did not post them. The best we could do is guess, and that is a waste of everyone's time.

Please post to us what you have come up with so far for code. If you don't have any code to speak of, then there are larger issues. People here will help with syntax and design flow, but will not complete the project for you. It would not be ethical for you to hand it in as your own work.

Christian

1

Hello,

I am a network administrator by profession, and believe in solid network protection.

For dialup internet connections of temporary length, I encourage a firewall. For high-speed long term connections (cable/dsl) I demand firewall protection, or I walk away from the situation and let them suffer.

Firewall implementation can vary by design; some people prefer to firewall the main router, and let the other machines go naked; others firewall each machine on their own. I implement combination sets, so that I am protected outside of my own network when my laptop travels to other environments.

On the linux servers, I operate IPTABLES. I am considering converting to ShoreWall (I think that is what it is called) when I upgrade from RedHat 9 to Fedora sometime in the future. ShoreWall has a webmin module that should allow for easier configuration, although once I figured out IPTABLES, it is not too hard to modify for different needs.

On Windoze, I have used ZoneAlarm without trouble. For Windoze servers, I have set them up behind hardware and linux-based software firewalls.

And on my beloved Macintosh, I run the internal firewall. The Mac doesn't have any server services running on it, so the internal firewall works just fine for me.

Of course, larger companies with performance considerations will likely pop for a hardware firewall that should be faster than the software ones.

Christian

Votes + Comments
webmin is cool :)
1

Hello,

OpenOffice will also allow you to directly export to .pdf format. You will not have options to control the export to the degree that Acrobat Writer will allow (such as picture quality, including fonts or not), but it will make generic PDF files just fine.

And it is free.

Christian

Votes + Comments
Good advice! -- dlh
1

Hello,

You want to go strict, because if you have a traditional firewall setup, that firewall is protecting you from attacks on the internet, but not inspecting anything coming through the wireless, because it is assumed to be trusted.

DMR is very good at what he does, and he will walk you through steps of forcing encryption on your network, and maybe even turning your transmitter power down some so that you ownly have the range that you need, instead of being able to talk to a few houses down the road (I run mine at 50 percent power). Encrypting means that your neighbors cannot see/utilize/abuse your connection.

He might even show you MAC address exclusions, but I would think that is excessive for what you want to do.

Enjoy!

Christian

1

Hello,

I believe that there is a flag on the icon from within Windoze that controls window behavior. Look for something along the lines of closing window when done executing. Look in the Program tag, and uncheck "Close on exit".

Christian

1

Hello,

Welcome to Linux! There are some things to learn, and you are in for a small challenge, but it is very well worth it, and you will be a happier fella for taking this step.

A FIRST MAJOR STEP you have already made -- you have realized that you should not be running around as the root user for normal day-to-day tasks. Only use Root when you need it. There are weeks that can go by that I have not used the root user operation... if you setup your system properly, and assign the rights correctly, you too can have a peaceful life.

If you are going to really migrate to Linux, you need to learn how to work in the Terminal, the Command Line Interface (CLI).

Look into the launcher bar there for the System Tools --> Terminal. If you are logged in as a normal user, here you can use the "su -" command to promote yourself to being a super-user. Security note: If you want only certain people to have this functionality on your public boxes, you can change the perms so that only a certain group of users can use this command. I have done this for 2+ years with no hiccups.

Ok, so you are in the terminal window. Time for a few commands:

cd Changes the directory
pwd Prints the path of the current directory
chmod Changes the permissions on a file
chown Changes the owner of a file
chgrp Changes the group ...

Votes + Comments
Excellent work my friend...you helped this person with fantastic info! :)
1

Hello,

To best understand the material, you need to USE the material. Write some small programs, such as writing sentances on the screen. Then, do some simple math, adding 2 + 2 together. Then, work in input statements "input a: input b:" and add those together. Then, work on a loop to make the program repeat and repeat until youtell it to stop.

Then get into files, and reading in information.

Programming is not a spectator sport; you need to put code into the machine, and get it to do something. Do not be afraid of the errors you will make.... this is how we learn.

Write some code. Now. Enter it here. We can go from there.

Christian

1

Hello,

If he wants a password to get into his program, he could control it with the OS, or he could wriite/use an encryption module to prompt the user for a password, and then write the encrypted string to a file. Then, when access time comes around, have him read in the value, and then do a compare to see if they match or not.

This can be done. If security is not all important, and this is just an exercise, or proof-of-concept type of thing, you can store the password in clear text. Nothing more than a a file open -- read -- compare exercise.

Christian

1

Hello,

Trees are plants that grow...

In computers, a tree is usually a binary data structure. There are also tree-like structures with many branches, beyond the two.

It is difficult to answer your question without context however.

Being in programming, you are probably asking about a tree of data storage.

Think about storing 3 numbers in order: 15, 27, 42.

You can write a data structure that has the following information:

[CODE]
struct data {
int number;
pointer prev;
pointer next;
}
[/CODE]

So, we can store this in a tree to help our data structure and search times.

15 --- 27 --- 42.

Your code would look at 27 first. Do you need the value smaller than 27? then go left. If you need the greater value, go right. If the value you are looking for is not there, you only looked at two variables instead of three.

This is a very simple example, but should give you the gist of it. Trees are data structures that are tricky to program, but when they are done correctly, searching for information is a lot less time intensive.

Christian

1

Below are the thoughts from a computer professional who has spent the last 10 years supporting Mac, Windows, and Linux computers in a variety of network applications. By no means will this general tips section be exhaustive -- that is what a good book is all about. I am also not going to spell out how to do everything by hand -- if you have a question, please post it to the Mac forums, and let our team of moderators look into the solution.

Let's get started:

[b]Setup
[/b]Every new computer that I receive coming out of a box, either for work or play, first gets booted up with the supplied disk setup, where I copy any vendor supplied information to a CD-ROM or network device. I then reboot with the supplied CD-ROMS and build the computer from scratch by myself. Why do this? So that I know what is installed, and can control the installation. I like to control the software that I am going to work with. I can also decided to throw in extra things, such as the development tools that OS X provides (compilers and the X environment).

[i]Partitons. [/i]I like to partition the large hard drive into three: A system partition, an applications partition, and a data partition. By doing this, I isolate my data from logical errors, such as if the OS becomes unstable, and I need to re-install. If the system comes corrupted, that damage will be isolated from my data partition (unless ...

Votes + Comments
Excellent post. --joeprogrammer
1

Hello,

It is spelled beans.

And no, your efforts to learn C++ are not going to go to waste. You should be learning coding style, learning that comments are just as important as the actual code, and learning about data structures and algorithms. Perhaps even efficient code... there are many ways to do things.

Continue to grow with C++. You might not ever master it, but you will learn a lot of things from it.

Christian

1

Hello,

I don't have the articles handy, but Novell's e-directory is faster and more reliable for an Enterprise environment than Active Directory. e-directory, or NDS as it was called, has been around since the mid 1990's, and offers a lot of management options for the Enterprise. NDS can manage disk quotas across the enterprise; AD does it on a server by server basis. NDS, in my opinion, has better tools and greater stability and functionality.

AD is not a deadbeat product, however. AD is tied into MS Exchange for Address book information. AD is a well needed step from the NT4 days of server islands out there without Enterprise management. AD can easily be setup to work with WAN sites and their often slow connections.

Perhaps to help us out, you might wish to tell us a bit more about your company, and what your needs are. What is important to you? Email? Printing? Citrix support? Different name spaces on the file servers?

Also, in order to attract comment to this topic, I am breaking your question into a new thread, so that others may notice it, and generate comments.

And between you and me, I would take the Novell.

Christian

1

Hello,

I used the pico editor to cut your text, and paste them into my RedHat 9 box. Then closed the editor, and it compiled just fine.

Maybe you are using vi and left something in there. Or Emacs left something. I dunno. Try [i]cat division.c[/i] and see if you see any junk in the file.

I do think, however, it is poor program design on two occasions:

  • You are using an integer for the division. per = (M+M+M) / 5 What happens if I enter in decimal numbers?

  • You are asking for input on one line. Will the computer accept typo corrections? I would input them one line at a time, so that if I do typo, I can correct it without deleting too much. You also do not check to make sure I enter in 5 values. What happens if I only put in four?

    (I have tested these conditions. You should too).

    Enjoy!

    Christian

1

Hello,

There are some ways to do this.

For CPU monitoring (and network), you can look into a package called mrtg that can be setup to monitor CPU processes, and graph it out. It will require you to setup snmpd and other things in order to get it to function properly.

For code, and how much CPU you use, check out your compiler to see if it supports profiling. I did that for COBOL code on a VAX/VMS, and for C++ on my Macintosh. Found out what functions used the most CPU time, and how long it took to do them. I liked profiling sorts, and comparing quicksort vs. bubble sort and the like.

Now, I know it isn't cross-platform, but the profiling might be the most efficient and non-skewing of the techniques. Why? because it is built into the compiler environment, and I am sure that the program coders took that into account.

Christian