Please, can you post you results and conclusion?
Did you manage to see voltage pattern for 'a'?

[QUOTE=hay_man;255068]nicko, thats my post. thanks anywayy[/QUOTE]
Yes, I know. That was my answer!

P.S. You should distinct [url=http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Union.html]union[/url] and [url=http://mathworld.wolfram.com/Intersection.html]intersection[/url]
And one more thing, I'm Micko, not nicko :)

[QUOTE=yadavvirendra;254330]
what is the difference between &ptarray[i] &
ptarray[i] due to that the address location of output 2 & output 3 is changing .

[/QUOTE]

You defined an array of pointers to int named ptarray. Array's elements are pointers. So ptarray[i] represent array element which is actually address of some variable elswhere. For example, if address of variable "var" is placed to ptrarray as i+1 element, ptarray[i] referes to address of variable "var". On the other hand, &ptarray[i] is memory address of ptarray[i]. Arrays are also placed in memory and each array's elements has it's own address. So, &ptarray[i] represents memory address of array's element, and it's value (ptarray[i]) represents memory address of variable "var" because ptarray is an array of pointers. Remember, pointer is nothing more than variable that store memory address of some other variable.
I hope it helps.

Well, according to this:
[url]http://www.cppreference.com/cppio/index.html[/url]
cin, cout are defined in iostream.
And this will also help ypu understand what is going on.
[url]http://www.cplusplus.com/ref/iostream/[/url]

I hope it helps!

Okay,
first when you write header file, you want to make protection from including this file more than once (inclusion guard). This is usually done like this:
[code]

ifndef FILE_NAME_H

define FIULE_NAME_H

//all code comes here

endif

[/code]
Your way can cause a lot of problem so please write it like this:
[code]

ifndef point_test

define point_test

class pointType
{
//blabla
};

endif

[/code]
I don't think it's a good idea to leave x and y variables to be public, it's better to be private and to have methods for accessing and modifying them, after all it's data encapsulation.
Also you wrote: int display and put comment method!?!. Method is function member of class and not variable.

As for part 1:
Area of circle is pi radius radius and
circumference of circle is 2piradius. So you need to swap code.
There is no need to send pi to function since it's constant. So make it constant be using this:
[code]

define pi 3.14159

[/code]
or something like this:
[code]
const double pi = 3.14159;
[/code]
As for part 2:
Theory behind inheritance is simple (at least on this level that is needed for solving this problem). Follow this example:
[code]

include <iostream>

using namespace std;

class Base
{
public:
void say_hi()
{
cout <<"Hi, base class\n";
}
};

class Derived : public Base
{
public:
void test()
{
cout <<"test, derived\n";
}
void test_call()
{
say_hi();
cout <<"test_call\n";
}
};

int main()
{
Derived d;
d.say_hi();
d.test();
d.test_call(); ...

[QUOTE=~s.o.s~;251601]Hey Micko, your program properly compiles and gives the expected output.
[/QUOTE]
Exactly!
[QUOTE=~s.o.s~;251601]What problem are you facing ????[/QUOTE]I'm not facing any problems!

[QUOTE=CurtisBridges;251348][IMG]file:///C:/Documents%20and%20Settings/Curtis%20Bridges/My%20Documents/My%20Pictures/Dinosaurs/scan.gif[/IMG][/QUOTE]

This is really a school example of how post shouldn't look like!

[code]
// Operator overloaded using a member functionComplex
Complex Complex::operator+( Complex &other )
{
return Complex( re + other.re, im + other.im );
}
[/code]

I hope this helps...

Well if you don't want to bother with math notation that will probably confuse you more than you actually are, [url=http://eternallyconfuzzled.com/articles/bigo.html]here[/url] is pretty good explanation using programmers perspective:

I hope this helps!

If you like more informations, this is another good link:
[url]http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Big_O_notation[/url]

Maybe you're trying to do something like this:
[code]

include <iostream>

include <map>

include <vector>

using namespace std;

int main ()
{
map < int, vector<int> > map_cont;
vector <int> v1;
vector <int> v2;
vector <int> v3;
int i;
for (i = 0; i < 10; i++)
{
v1.push_back(i);
}
for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
{
v2.push_back(i);
}
for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
{
v3.push_back(i);
}
map_cont[1] = v1;
map_cont[2] = v2;
map_cont[3] = v3;
map < int, vector<int> > :: iterator it_trav, it_max;

it_max = map_cont.begin();
for (it_trav = map_cont.begin(); it_trav != map_cont.end(); ++it_trav)
{
    if ( it_max->second.size() < it_trav->second.size() )
    {
        it_max = it_trav;
    }
}

cout << "Element with vector of max. no. of elements:" << it_max->second.size();
cout << " and it's map[" << it_max->first << "]!" << endl;

}
[/code]

This code is just for demonstration. I hope it helps!

Micko

Grunt commented: Nice--[Grunt] +1

Hi people,
when starting many of us were warn not to use gets() function. We know it's unsafe and it might easily crah program. On many boards there is FAQ in which there are advices not to use gets(). I wonder why such function exist in standard library and why is it written in the first place.
What is actual use of gets() exept that many of us use it in school for quick and dirty user input?
Why is it there? I assume because of historical reasons, but which reasons that is real question.
Thanks

Grunt commented: Good Question +1

This code I wrote earlier when I need to make word statistics in text. by word i assumed everything that is separated with whitespaces. Weel you coud to use rdbuf() member function of ifstream to read entire file if you want. I placed my code to help you out, it's not supposed to be solution.
Cheers