AdamWill

"This library has been an accepted part of the Linux OS for years now, and Red Hat in particular which is so often used as a web server OS, and so surprise has been expressed by many (quite rightly) at how it could go undetected so long in an open source OS."

Just a note to prevent anyone drawing the wrong conclusion from this: RH OSes don't usually use gnutls for web server security. We provide the Apache modules for all three major SSL/TLS libraries - mod_security (OpenSSL), mod_gnutls (gnutls) and mod_nss (NSS). mod_security is the one you're most likely to wind up with if you don't make an explicit choice. Your webserver is obviously only vulnerable to this exploit if you're using mod_gnutls (and you haven't installed the update yet).

AdamWill

By testing against real-world sites you're also throwing network randomness into the equation. I bet if you ran the same set of tests five times in a row, some of the numbers would be quite different. I think it'd be a fairer to test to run against copies of sites stored on a server on the local network.

AdamWill

khess: right click GNOME panel, click 'Add to panel...', click 'Command Line'. Been there for years. Best not complain about the current desktops being stagnant if you don't know all their features yet. =) deskbar-applet is a more sophisticated version of a similar idea, as well.

It's a bit odd to complain about a lack of innovation then say you don't use KDE 4 because you preferred KDE 3. Surely that's because there was, well, innovation? Even though you didn't like it, it's still innovation.

You also managed to entirely miss the fact that GNOME's 2 series is coming to an end, and GNOME 3.0 will arrive probably within the year, featuring an entirely new interface - gnome-shell. http://live.gnome.org/GnomeShell . It's really worth doing a bit of research before writing this kind of article. You might also have come across Nepomuk, which will make a significant difference to the desktop experience in both KDE and GNOME in future.