A minor update to the 1.6 version of jQuery was just released today. After a big outcry of version 1.6's changes to the way properties work, the jQuery team quickly released version 1.6.1 to make the new techniques more compatible with the older functionality, hopefully preventing sites from breaking. The release also fixed some bugs, as did version 1.6.2. And now 1.6.3 also fixes several bugs, along with one change that some people will find disappointing: They dropped support for the requestAnimationFrame API. When 1.6 came out, support for requestAnimationFrame was added to allow for smoother animation. However, requestAnimationFrame itself …

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When I was studying computer programming in college many years ago, I didn't imagine that our work could impact lives, particularly in a negative way. We've heard reports (mostly true) of death, dying, and destruction as a result of software problems, such as the time a plane flew right into a mountain due to the users not being informed of changes to the software. (For more interesting tidbits, check out the check out this [URL="http://www.cs.tau.ac.il/~nachumd/horror.html"]Software Horror Stories page[/URL].) We can never predict what kind of bizarre things will happen as a result of software bugs, but today's news is certainly …

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[ATTACH=left]17212[/ATTACH]In the past, the word [I]embedded[/I] was limited to specialty devices that a lot of us used, but few programmers really cared about. Embedded devices meant things like the controllers on your microwave oven or the computer that ran your car's fuel injection system. There are certainly a lot of software engineers working in that realm, but for those of us who program for PCs, we had little interest in embedded technology. But that is all changing thanks to the huge number of handheld devices that need programming. While most of us still won't be writing at the assembly-language level, …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]16929[/ATTACH]In a blog posting August 26, Microsoft announced that it is revising the licensing terms of its Security Development Lifecycle, moving parts of it to a Creative Commons license. Security Development Lifecycle is a methodology that Microsoft developed that incorporates best security practices at every level of the development lifecycle when security is important--such as in secure business environments or where personally identifiable information is vital. The methodology includes a set of documentation explaining the process and how to follow it, as well as a set of software tools to help in the software development. But there's always been a …

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[ATTACH=left]17191[/ATTACH]Today at Intel's IDF 2010 was the official launch of the 2011 version of Intel Parallel Studio. Parallel Studio is a set of tools that enhance Visual Studio to support full parallel programming. This is more than just a simple plug-in for Visual Studio. It's an entire set of tools covering the entire development workflow. In terms of parallel development, these steps are design, build and debug, verify, and tune. For designing, you have the Intel Parallel Advisor, which sismplifies the process of adding parallelism to your application. For the build and debug phase, you have the Parallel Composer. Together …

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[ATTACH=RIGHT]17189[/ATTACH]I'm here at the Intel Developer Forum 2010 in San Francisco, and this has been a great opportunity for a programmer such as myself. While most programmers might think of Intel as a hardware manufacturer and look to other companies (such as Microsoft) for their development tools, in fact that couldn't be further from the truth. In addition to creating some amazing hardware technology, Intel has a huge set of tools for developing software that runs on the devices and computers powered by their technology. One such such device that has a whole set of tools is the Atom processor. …

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I'm still here at the Intel Developer Forum (IDF) 2010, and just had the chance to try out something cool. The Intel Atom processors are lightweight x86 processors for use in a whole range of small devices. And being x86-based, they can run modern desktop operating sytesms. At the beginning of 2010, Intel released the n450 version of the Atom. And to help engineers and hobbyists get started, they've created a "development board" which is a small circuit board containing an Atom processor, 1G of SO-DIMM memory, and several ports including USB 2.0 ports, a video port, and two ethernet …

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I'm here at the IDF 2010 conference in San Francisco, and during this morning's keynote session, I had to the opportunity to see some pretty cool technology. One of the things that they demonstrated was essentially the next generation of handheld game controllers. Think of the Wii remotes, but with more accuracy in 3 dimensions. Wii remotes use triangulation and technically only detect two dimensions (although clever programming in the Wii helps pick out a certain amount of a third dimension). But these devices they demonstrated had full three dimensional handling. The new technology relies on the latest and greatest …

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Rapid Application Development has come a long way since the early days of Delphi and Visual Basic in the mid 1990s. I remember those days well, as I immersed myself in Pascal development with the original Delphi back in 1995 and even wrote a couple of books about it. Delphi was created by Borland, and then, after Borland changed its name twice (first to Inprise, then back to Borland), Delphi was later moved to a new company spun off by Borland in 2006 called CodeGear. CodeGear was then bought by Embarcadero Technologies in 2008. Today Delphi and its descendants are …

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The End.