[QUOTE=phorce;1727000]Your class (.h) and functions to the class (.cpp) should be in separate files and then included in main (:[/QUOTE]
Thanks, but I have no experience in seperating codes in two files. How can I do that (School didn't teach me that).

This is the program I wrote for my CS project. Compiler is TurboC++. I initially added a lot of garbage code in it and am having a hard time cleaning it up. Can you guys please suggest improvements in the code below. Thanks in advance.
[CODE]
//STUDENT MANAGEMENT

include<conio.h>
include<fstream.h>
include<string.h>
include<stdio.h>

class student
{
char name[50];
int r_no;
int classs;
float marks;
char grade;
public:
int modify1();
void modification();
void getdata();
void display();
void search();
int getrno()
{
return r_no;
}
};
student ob1[10],ob2,ob3[10],ob4;
void student::getdata()
{
char ch;
cin.get(ch);
cout<<"\n\n\t\t\tEnter the roll number: ";
cin>>r_no;
cout<<"\n\t\t\tEnter name:";
cin>>name;
cout<<"\n\t\t\tEnter class:";
cin>>classs;
cout<<"\n\t\t\tEnter the marks:";
cin>>marks;
if(marks>=75) grade='A';
else if(marks>=60) grade='B';
else if(marks>=50) grade='C';
else if(marks>=40) grade='D';
else grade='F';
}
void student::display()
{
cout<<" \nRoll no :"<<r_no;
cout<<" \nName:"<<name ;
cout<<"\nclass:"<<classs<<"\n"<<name<<"\t..has passed exams with "<<marks<<"\t and grade: "<<grade;
}

void student::modification()
{
char clas[4];
cout<<" Roll no:"<<r_no<<"\n";
cout<<"Name: "<<name<<"\t class:"<<clas<<"\t marks"<<marks<<"\n";
cout<<"\n Enter new details";
char nm[20]=" " , cl[4]=" ";
float mks;
cout<<"\n new name:(press . to retain old one) ";
cin>>nm;
cout<<"\n new class :(press . to retain old one) ";
cin>>cl;
cout<<"\n new marks:(press -1 to retain old one) ";
cin>>mks;
if(strcmp(nm,".")!=0)
strcpy(name,nm);
if (strcmp(cl,".")!=0)
strcpy(clas,cl);
if(mks!=-1)
{
marks=mks;
if(marks>=75) grade='A';
else if(marks>=60) grade='B';
else if(marks>=50) grade='C';
else if(marks>=40) grade='D';
else grade='F';

}

}
void main()
{
clrscr();
last:;
clrscr();
int rn,tr,n,p,i=0,record=0;
long pos;
char ans;
do
{
clrscr();
cout<<"\n\n\n\t\t\tMenu for displaying\entering data\n\n";
cout<<"\t\t\t1.Enter the details\n\n";
cout<<"\t\t\t2.Displaying the details\n\n";
cout<<"\t\t\t3.searching details\n\n"; cout<<"\t\t\t4.Modification \n\n";
cout<<"\t\t\t5.Deletion\n\n";
cin>>tr;
clrscr(); ...

I signed up for the Google Code-In Project for OpenSUSE today, as my task is to get 20 people to fill up a survey about public opinion of OpenSUSE, Daniweb seemed a natural starting point to me due to the high density of people with computer expertise
Here is the link for the survey
[URL="

I think I should try bluetooth.Maybe while trying to connecting to network, the computer might be sending more current then the phone can handle

[QUOTE=;][/QUOTE]
Well, I consider the thread as solved. Thanks for the small tidbits of info on the code.

I don't think they are non-portable, I compiled them and found a fair amount of success under Code::Blocks 10.05.

@Narue Thanks for the advice, But I'm curious, what thing makes this program print out a rhyme rather than a compiler error.

Here is a program I found [URL="

When I use the USB cable to connect, the phone just restarts. and I a message pops up on the upper right side like "GSM Disconnected". And even if I remove the data cable and connect it again the computer won't recognize the phone until I restart the OS.

The phone is a feature phone, no fancy OS backing it up. I can tether it in WinXP. I don't know what the OS is called and its definitely not Symbian.

I tried to tether my Samsung SGH-L700 phone in Ubuntu 11.04.I successfully created the connection and configured it correctly. The problem is that, whenever I try to connect to the internet using the phone, the phone restarts and I'm not able to connect. Any workaround for it?

A 6000 page book will be almost 18 inches. I would recommend a thesis on a select area of interest of yours. I am not out of High School so you can ignore me and take heed of more experienced posters here

I think you should do exercises based on each chapter. I am a newbie in this field, but it works well for me. Practice is the key. When I first opened the book, I couldn't even make sense of the programs written in there, now I can confidently write a pretty moderately difficult program without errors in one go. I would recommend you to learn the "C" part of C++ and then move on to the Object oriented part.