According to new independent research commissioned by Corero Network Security, and conducted by the Ponemon Institute, two thirds of banks in the United States have suffered a Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attack during the last 12 months. The 64% statistic refers to the number of IT and IT security practitioners who reported that the banks at which they work were subject to at least one DDoS attack during 2012. ![dweb-banks](/attachments/small/0/dweb-banks.jpg "align-right") The [research](http://www.corero.com/resources/files/analyst-reports/CNS_Report_Ponemon_Jan13.pdf) questioned 650 IT and IT security professionals working at a total of 351 banks, including some of the biggest in the world, and the sadly not …

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[URL="https://www.facebook.com/TeaMp0isoN"]TeaMp0isoN[/URL], a black-hat hacking collective, has announced that it is to collaborate with Anonymous on Operation Robin Hood which swears to take money from the banks (in the form of stolen credit card data) and redistribute the wealth from the 1% to the 99% in support of the Occupy Movement. But just who exactly are TeaMp0isoN and what impact is Operation Robin Hood likely to have? [ATTACH=RIGHT]23129[/ATTACH]Let's start with the easy stuff first and get a handle on TeaMp0isoN. Although you might think that finding anything out about a hacking collective which does things the likes of the FBI and …

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Chip and PIN credit card attack leaves banks on shaky ground according to one analyst, although oddly enough the banks appear to disagree. Researchers at the University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory have revealed how the Chip and PIN credit card security system is flawed and left vulnerable to fraud. Steven Murdoch, Saar Drimer, Ross Anderson and Mike Bond, the researchers in question, have apparently tested the 'wedge' attack scenario against cards issued by most of the mainstream banks in the UK and found them all to be equally vulnerable. Of course, this is not the first time that cards have …

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It’s no secret that one big key to unlocking the business and consumer technology spending lockbox is easier credit from banks and other lenders. On the surface, the better-than-expected earnings news from big banks like Wells Fargo, Goldman Sachs and JP Morgan Chase gave a much-needed boost to that theory. If the big banks are claiming huge quarterly profits, the thinking goes, then credit should begin easing, borrowers can start getting money again, and tech companies will see a good rebound in sales. That would not only boost tech stocks and provide more cash for research and development, it would …

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Technology workers are nervous enough without worrying about the health and safety of their investment deposits. While I think what I'm bringing to you now is nine parts hyperbole and one part reality, it makes for an interesting and even frightening discussion. Specifically, are your bank and investment deposits safe? Today's Tech Ticker has an economist who thinks there might be justified cause for concern. Before I get into that, note that the Federal Deposit Insurance Commission (FDIC) insures individual bank accounts for up to $100,000, although if you have more money than that in the bank and your bank …

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Allow me one last word on the credit crisis of last week. I hope by now I've demonstrated that credit and debt aren't the sole domain of green eye-shaded numbers crunchers on Wall Street. As the green-eye shaded numbers cruncher in your own company's finance department can tell you, bad economics effects everybody. So is the crisis over? Hardly. But banks and other lenders should get back to the business of making loans and making sure businesses just like yours have all the capital they need to grow and prosper. Some experts even think that there is money to be …

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The End.