According to the [URL="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article4969312.ece"]Sunday Times[/URL] today, anyone in the UK who wants to buy a mobile phone will need to produce a valid passport as a form of ID soon. The story is wrapped around the planned introduction of a national database to help combat crime and terrorism. The proposed database [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry2479.html"]would contain details of every telephone call and every email sent in the UK[/URL] along with information coverage individual Internet access usage. Now it seems that in order to push ahead with this state surveillance scheme, the government is considering a compulsory national register for every owner of every …

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Telecommuters are among the luckiest employees out there: we can eat donuts during conference calls (use the mute button, please!), lay our heads on our desks when the mood strikes, and can show up to work in a canary-yellow caftan and no one is the wiser. That is, unless your employer suddenly decides to turn the hairy eyeball of technology on you. [URL="http://it.toolbox.com/blogs/narikannan/working-from-homeyour-boss-may-be-watching-you-work-remotely-26374"] ITtoolbox's Nari Kannan[/URL] writes about a [URL="http://www.star-telegram.com/business/story/802951.html"]somewhat disturbing story[/URL] that's recently made it to syndication from the Wall Street Journal. It details the lengths some employers will go to in order to keep tabs on employees who …

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According to the UK government, new proposals within the [URL="http://www.commonsleader.gov.uk/output/page2461.asp"]Communications Data Bill[/URL] are being put forward in order to prevent and detect crime as well as protect national security. The government argues that unless legislation is amended to reflect changes in technology, the ability of public authorities to counter criminal and terrorist activity will be undermined. According to Jonathan Bamford, the Assistant Information Commissioner in the UK, the proposed Bill sees us once again "sleepwalking into a surveillance society." Bamford is not alone in this view, unsurprisingly so when you consider that the changes to the law would, in effect, …

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Many years ago, during a press visit to Microsoft HQ in Seattle, I was given relative freedom to wander around the Redmond campus. Of course, there were some areas that were strictly out of bounds. Areas like the one which was entered via the 'Cryogenics Lab' door for example. At the time I thought it a little odd that Microsoft should be investing in cryogenics, but wrote it off as the kind of thing you can get your company to play with when you are the richest man on the planet. More recently, in 2004 to be precise, I noted …

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WebProNews reported on Friday (link below) that Twitter was going to be launching a feature that makes the service location aware. Basically, you can choose to have your tweets mapped by longitude and latitude. The possible benefits seem to be twofold. Initially, as a follower you can choose to follow tweets based on location making the information you find more usable for whatever purposes you may need. Second, the potential for companies that tweet as part of their marketing communications campaign to target their tweets geographically to take advantage of rich target markets has to be considered a next logical …

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The End.