The annual 'Black Friday' discounted shopping storm is no longer just an American event; it's hit the UK like a hurricane today. Last night police were called to four different supermarkets with heavily discounted televisions after large crowds started to gather for the midnight opening. At one Asda store (a Walmart owned UK supermarket chain) there was fighting as shoppers opted to get physical in order to secure that electrical bargain. Then, both the Tesco supermarket and Currys PC World electrical superstore websites buckled under the pressure of would-be shoppers keen to get an online bargain. Next it was clothing …

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Today is Black Friday and people are going a bit insane standing on sidewalks overnight waiting for the the big deal on their desired electronics. Everyone from WalMart to Target to Best Buy to the Apple Store is getting involved. And so are online retailers like Amazon. And to be sure there are some good deals to be had out there, but there are also some questionable ones and it pays to make sure you shop carefully today. Just because it's labeled a Black Friday deal doesn't mean it necessarily an outstanding deal. [B]Make Sure It's a Deal[/B] [URL="http://twitter.com/charlesarthur"]Charles Arthur[/URL], …

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We've all heard of search engine optimization, or "SEO". That's the online search engine mechanism that allows online businesses to seed their web landing pages with key code words to entice visitors and shoppers. One big SEO term this week is "Black Friday" -- the day-after-Thanksgiving shopfest that launches the holiday shopping season. Online retailers are already advertising their Black Friday shopping specials - - and getting good results. This leads me to believe that the holiday shopping season will be more robust than the notoriously negative national media would have us believe. Here are some early numbers to back …

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Okay, you have to admit, I called that one. In our last blog, I pointed out that a tight money supply could prevent companies, especially smaller ones, from getting money to grow their businesses, make new hires, do more research -- that sort of thing. I said that if companies couldn't get access to money, the economy would suffer. The Federal Reserve had to act (okay, I didn't mention the Fed specifically, but calling Batman wasn't going to help). So what's the big deal with a tight money supple? Imagine you're a small web design firm looking to roll out …

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The End.