The recently revised Facebook community standards page states that the social network is on a mission "to give people the power to share and make the world more open" however it appears that it may have been giving the wrong people the power to share stuff you thought was private. According to security researcher and bug bounty hunter [Laxman Muthiyah](http://www.7xter.com/2015/03/how-i-exposed-your-private-photos.html) Facebook's photo sync feature came with a critical flaw which "allows any malicious Facebook application to read your mobile photos." The vulnerability concerns Facebook's Photo Sync feature for mobile users, which was introduced back in 2012 but because it was …

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It may only have impacted a "small number of users" for a "short period of time" as a Facebook spokesperson put it, but by pushing out buggy code the social networking giant created a potentially huge privacy problem for those whose accounts it did touch upon. Considering that Facebook has some 350 million users, that 'small number' could be really quite big when you think about it. Facebook itself is not revealing how many were hit earlier in the week when the buggy code push took place, but if it were just half of one percent of the userbase that's …

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Does anyone know just what is happening with Microsoft Windows Mobile devices? It would appear that many users with Windows Mobile powered mobile phones have been getting SMS text messages dated 2016. The first reports came as folk started to receive Happy New Year messages from family and friends on the 1st Jan 2010 and they noticed that those texts carried a date of 2016. Could it be, as some have suggested, that 010110 is binary for 16 (unlikely, seeing as it is actually 22) or is it just a bug? All the evidence points at a bug, the WMY2K16 …

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Twitter has [URL="http://status.twitter.com/post/240745460/retweet-feature-temporarily-disabled"]suspended its new retweet function[/URL]. Now, this takes me back. When I started writing about technology this stuff was commonplace. A software company would announce a new version or a new package, its target date would come and go and then it would be released as buggy as anything. Windows itself didn't get it right until version 3.1 (3.0 caught the imagination of the market, 3.1 worked a load better). The fact that this doesn't happen any more is to be applauded = except here we are with Twitter issuing a new tweak and unissuing it within days. …

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Once upon a time, Usenet newsgroups were the Twitter, Facebook and forums of the online world. All the early Internet community makers were there, and important announcements such as the arrival of Mosaic by Marc Andreesen broke there first. Then the inevitable happened, and Usenet slowly imploded. That could have been the end of it, but everyone assumed this fairy tale would come with a Hollywood ending after Google got involved and waved a magic wand over the Usenet archive and turned it into [URL="http://groups.google.com"]Google Groups[/URL]. Unfortunately, not a lot happened in the years since February 2001 when Google acquired …

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What happens when your security software thinks your operating system is out to get you? Users of AVG8 discovered the answer when it decided that a Windows XP user32.dll system file was infected with a Trojan, and deleted it. Uh oh Buck, biddly biddly biddly. What happens when you delete the user32.dll in Windows XP? Well it might not reboot at all. If you are lucky it might try to reboot and then enter into a never ending reboot cycle. Neither are exactly good things to happen to your computer. That said, as The Inquirer [URL="http://www.theinquirer.net/gb/inquirer/news/2008/11/13/avg-update-cripples-windows-xp"]reported[/URL] you cannot argue with …

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So today, according to Tuesday's announcement, there will be new iPhone software available from Apple. We don't know exactly when, in the UK at 1.20 it wasn't there, but no matter - it's going to arrive. And it's going to address issues a few users have noticed, specifically poor battery life and dropped calls. Hold on. A phone that drops calls. A phone which - as I've found a few times - lasts less than a day if you have location services switched on and particularly if you have the brightness turned up on the display. Yes, you can work …

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Here we go again with the iPhone, Apple says it's issuing a fix without - as is Apple's habit - [URL="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/7569393.stm"]telling us what it's fixing[/URL]. Even as a satisfied user I can think of plenty. Searchable e-mail. MobileMe that really works on my iPhone (it still does nothing outside theb e-mail). A way of using the thing that doesn't demolish the battery before you've been out for a whole day. A do-list function for the phone that syncs with the do-list on iCal. I suspect we're in for nothing as dramatic. Which is a shame.

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You really could not make this up, despite the fact that the computer bugs in question are called 'crazy rasberry ants' and reported quotes from victims range from the ridiculous [URL="http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/us_and_americas/article3941545.ece"]"If you’ve seen a car racing, that’s how they are. They’re going fast, fast, fast. They’re crazy"[/URL] to the sublimely ridiculous [URL="http://www.pcpro.co.uk/news/197832/houston-weve-got-a-problem-pceating-ants.html"]"You'd get 3,000 or 4,000 ants inside and they create arcs. They'll wipe out any computer."[/URL] Yet apparently it is real and the ants have invaded Houston by the billion, consuming pretty much any electronic goods that get in the way. It seems that the little critters came in …

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The End.