The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) took aim at 14 consumer electronics companies for violating GPL licensed products. This is the largest lawsuit of its kind ever filed. This lawsuit uses what Richard Stallman calls "tivoization" as its defense. Tivoization, if you recall from my post, "[URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story240080.html"]Does Linus Torvalds Hate Freedom?[/URL]" involves the use of GPL licensed software with a product without allowing the user access to the source code and thereby preventing the user from changing that code--two very important stipulations of the GPL and in the definition of free software. I also made the following observation in that …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 1

Nothing gets people in the Linux World riled up like comparing distributions, desktops or editors. But for the new Linux user, the whole thing is a bit confusing. What do we tell [I]them[/I]? Do we verbally slug it out in forums or do we offer gentle guidance to those entering the Linux jungle for the first time? It's hard not to offer an opinion in such emotional matters. One might believe that Linux, choice of desktop and editors are religious notions instead of technical ones. I offer the following gentle guidelines for the newbie who dares enter our sacred space. …

Member Avatar
Member Avatar
+0 forum 7

Erik Anderson and Rob Landley are at it again. The guys who brought us the [URL=http://busybox.net/]BusyBox[/URL] toolset for resource-constrained Linux and Unix systems, together with the Software Freedom Law Center, have filed yet another GPL enforcement lawsuit for copyright infringement. This time it’s against [URL=http://www.extremenetworks.com/index.aspx]Extreme Networks Inc.[/URL], a maker of high-performance network switches and other connectivity and communications gear. Without even reading [URL=http://www.softwarefreedom.org/news/2008/jul/21/busybox/extreme-networks.pdf]the complaint[/URL], I would put my money on the FSLC; the previous four such cases resulted in out-of-court settlements in favor of the plaintiffs. In those cases, defendents were ordered to distribute source code in compliance with the …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

Lawyers for [URL=http://busybox.net/]BusyBox[/URL], the open-source Unix utilities popular for use in embedded applications, filed two more copyright infringement lawsuits yesterday, claiming that Bell Microproducts and Super Micro Computer violated terms of the GNU General Public License that governs the software. “Before filing these lawsuits, we contacted both companies and gave them opportunity to remedy their violations privately, but they were continually unresponsive,” said Aaron Williamson counsel for the [URL=http://www.softwarefreedom.org]Software Freedom Law Center[/URL]. The SFLC represents BusyBox developers Erik Andersen and Rob Landley. “When companies are contacted by the SFLC or anyone else about a GPL violation, they need to respond …

Member Avatar
+0 forum 0

The End.