The world's largest technical support, software and hardware companies use Linux on a daily basis for a variety of tasks and solutions. This post gives you an overview of all the ways in which large companies use Linux. Most don't use Linux on the desktop but do use it in ways you might expect (and a few you might not expect) a company of that magnitude to use it. They've leveraged Linux for some of the most critical workloads and 100% uptime service levels. Welcome to the world of enterprise Linux. [B]10. Intrusion Detection Systems[/B] - Linux provides the perfect …

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[URL="http://redhat.com"]Red Hat[/URL] Enterprise Linux now comes with built-in virtualization ([URL="http://linux-kvm.org"]KVM[/URL]) but is Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (RHEV) about to go to the virtual mat with [URL="http://vmware.com"]VMware[/URL]? If you look at their [URL="http://www.redhat.com/v/swf/rhev/demo.html"]RHEL video[/URL], you'll come away with a resounding 'Yes' to that question. Red Hat purchased [URL="http://www.redhat.com/promo/qumranet/"]Qumranet[/URL] in 2008 to acquire their KVM-based virtualization solution and SolidICE product based on the SPICE protocol. What does RHEL mean for consumers? For the end user, folks like you and me, it means that hosting companies can offer more services to developer and companies that host their applications at third-party locations, which in …

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It's rare that a company like [URL="http://www.redhat.com"]Red Hat[/URL] would remove a high-end feature from its popular commercial operating system but that's just what it did. Red Hat Enterprise Linux (RHEL) 6.0 will ship without the [URL="http://www.xen.org"]Xen[/URL] hypervisor. Instead, it will include Red Hat's own [URL="http://www.linux-kvm.org"]KVM[/URL] virtualization. Has Red Hat done itself a disservice with this move? Is it alienating an entire user base? Absolutely not, to both questions. After Red Hat purchased Qumranet in 2008 (and acquired KVM in the deal), it no longer needed to support a second, competing hypervisor. The people at Red Hat and Qumranet are smart …

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This just in: [URL="http://www.redhat.com"]Red Hat, Inc[/URL]. just announced today that its Red Hat Enterprise Virtualization (REV) now includes the ability to run Virtual Desktop Infrastructure or VDI. I've been a long time anti-VDI voice but Red Hat just might be the one to pull it off and make it work with its KVM and the SPICE protocol both of which were acquired in their 2008 purchase of Qumranet. If any non-container technology can make VDI work sufficiently, it is KVM and SPICE. Although, [URL="http://www.parallels.com"]Parallels[/URL] still has my highest praise as the only solution that I would personally endorse as a …

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If you've ever remotely operated one computer from another, you've used desktop virtualization. It's been built into Linux, Mac OS X and Windows for years, but recent moves by Red Hat could signal that it's about to go mainstream. The Linux company late last week announced that it was opening the source code for [url=http://www.spice-space.org/]SPICE[/url], the Simple Protocol forIndependent Computing Environment it inherited along with its acquisition of virtualization tools maker Qumranet in 2008. Once proprietary, SPICE is the transport protocol used by Qumranet's [url=http://www.linux-kvm.org/page/Main_Page]Kernel-based Virtual Machine (KVM)[/url], the open-source hypervisor for Linux that has been part the kernel since …

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If you haven't heard of [URL="http://www.proxmox.org"]ProxMox[/URL] yet, you need to hit the site right now and grab the [URL="http://pve.proxmox.com/wiki/Downloads"]ISO[/URL] file for the latest version (1.3) as of this writing. ProxMox is a bare metal (Type 1) hypervisor that comes with [URL="http://www.linux-kvm.org"]KVM[/URL] (Kernel Virtual Machine) and [URL="http://www.proxmox.org"]OpenVZ[/URL] technology rolled into a single system. That's right. For the price (free) of a single download, you have two distinct types of virtualization supported on the same system. KVM is fully virtualized virtual machines (VMs)and OpenVZ is a zone or container-based virtualization. ProxMox is a web-manageable dual-purpose virtualization hypervisor. To me, it is the …

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Do my eyes deceive me or did [URL="http://www.redhat.com"]Red Hat[/URL] just deliver its own smackdown on the virtualization community today? I was wondering when they were going to offer a solution that combined their new acquistion, Qumranet and the KVM product. I don't have to wait any longer. The products, including the Enterprise Hypervisor have yet to be priced but will be introduced over the next 18 months. This announcement follows their own [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4012.html"]original announcement[/URL] that they've partnered with Microsoft and the [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4023.html"]Citrix announcement[/URL] to provide XenServer free of charge. I love Red Hat but I'm afraid unless they specify a …

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There's only one company that doesn't use Linux for its server virtualization platform. Can you guess which one it is? If you guessed [URL="http://www.microsoft.com"]Microsoft[/URL], you're correct. [URL="http://www.microsoft.com/virtualization"]Microsoft[/URL] is a newbie in the virtualization space but wants in and may make significant dents in the already well-established market that is significantly owned by VMware. For Windows-only virtualization, there may be some validity to the switch to Hyper-V. For the rest of us, who are either too stubborn or too smart to make the shift to Hyper-V, what are our choices? The following is a list of 5 of the main players …

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Red Hat announced a new bare-metal [I]hypervisor[/I] technology last week at the Red Hat Summit in Boston. It is based on KVM (Kernel-Based Virtual Machine) technology and actually has been included in Linux kernel version 2.6.20 and up. This announcement has some Red Hat and virtualization proponents wondering why Red Hat is throwing its support behind this solution when it already includes Xen technology. Xen is true hypervisor virtualization; KVM is not. KVM is hosted virtualization that employs QEMU for virtual machines. Red Hat may be pushing this KVM solution to allow more users to try an entry-level bare metal …

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The End.