I am no great fan of the concept of National ID Cards, although my reasoning is not so much based upon distrusting the 'if you've done nothing wrong you have nothing to fear' argument nor even the 'big brother invasion of privacy' paranoia which seems to grip most of the mainstream media in the UK whenever the subject is mentioned. I do admit that both of these things do play a part in my dislike of ID Cards though, but the real deal clincher for me has always been a bit more pragmatic: the UK Government is really crap at …

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According to [URL="http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29447088/"]reports,[/URL] the security relating to the official Presidential helicopter, Marine One, has been breached. It would appear that engineering and comms data, amounting to a complete avionics package including blueprints, about Obama's helicopter turned up on the computer of defence contractor who also had a P2P file sharing application on the same computer. A copy of the blueprints, inadvertently made available for sharing if the reports are accurate, also turned up on a computer based in Tehran, Iran. The good news is that the US military know exactly where the file originated and where it ended up. The …

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Reports suggest that Google Earth might have put the top secret British nuclear defence headquarters, at the Faslane HM Naval Base Clyde in Scotland, at risk from terrorist attack after the satellite mapping shows clear images of the facility. The images are highly detailed and even show a couple of Vanguard Class submarines docked. Newspaper reports recount how a couple of years back Google was asked to blur British military bases in Iraq as well as certain strategic military installations in the UK on grounds of national security. I am led to believe that updates to Google Earth have meant …

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According to the UK government, new proposals within the [URL="http://www.commonsleader.gov.uk/output/page2461.asp"]Communications Data Bill[/URL] are being put forward in order to prevent and detect crime as well as protect national security. The government argues that unless legislation is amended to reflect changes in technology, the ability of public authorities to counter criminal and terrorist activity will be undermined. According to Jonathan Bamford, the Assistant Information Commissioner in the UK, the proposed Bill sees us once again "sleepwalking into a surveillance society." Bamford is not alone in this view, unsurprisingly so when you consider that the changes to the law would, in effect, …

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The End.