It's been a year now since the Dyre malware family was first profiled, and there is no sign of infection rates slowing down. In fact, [reports](http://www.scmagazine.com/trend-micro-documents-new-malware-infections/article/418266/) would seem to suggest just the opposite with infections up from 4,000 at the end of last year to 9,000 at the start of this. The lion's share being split pretty evenly between European and North American users. So I was interested to spot this Tweet from Ronnie T [@iHeartMalware](https://twitter.com/iheartmalware) who is actually Ronnie Tokazowski, a senior researcher at PhishMe, which declares: "I'm tired of dumping #Dyre configurations by hand. So I wrote a …

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In what has been called by some commentators the ‘most significant update in five years’ the latest version of Python finally come of age. Python 2.5 not only apparently fixes some 450 bugs discovered since the 2.4 release was, err, released, but also throws in some 350 patches for good measure. Hey Microsoft, there’s a new patch king in town and it’s the [URL="http://www.python.org/psf/"]Python Software Foundation[/URL]. Although officially ‘suitable’ for production use, the changes that help improve the way Python supports 64 bit systems might break certain C extension modules, so you might want to take that particular definition of …

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There are precious few archaeologists in Japan, and only a handful who produce their own software programs to analyze geographic information. One who does is Professor [Izumi Niiro](http://www.okayama-u.ac.jp/user/arch/about/niiro.html) of the Okayama University. A convert from Perl, Professor Niiro now uses Python to perform data analysis via the Geographic Resources Analysis Support System (GRASS) in order to accurately survey the Japanese burial grounds known as Kofun that were built between the third and seventh centuries. The largest Kofun site in the Okayama Prefecture in Japan is also the fourth largest in the whole of Japan. The 'Tsukuriyama Kofun' is the burial …

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If you’re a Ruby or Python developer building AJAX applications, you’ve got to learn JavaScript. Even if you’re converting Ruby code to client-side JavaScript with a tool like [URL= http://www.scribd.com/doc/220397/RJShow-it-works] RJS[/URL], it can still be helpful to know the AJAX component for adding features and debugging. Now Microsoft is promoting APAX and ARAX, techniques similar to AJAX that supplant JavaScript with Python and Ruby languages commonly used on the server side of the dynamic Web apps. The news was brought to light last week at O’Reilly’s [URL=http://en.oreilly.com/rails2008/public/content/home] RailsConf[/URL] by Microsoft’s [URL=http://www.iunknown.com/]John Lam[/URL], who was there giving a talk on his …

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The End.