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Password Security

 
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I don't repost from Facebook here, but I can't resist reposting this one

 
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whenever i read "blood of a virgin", Supernatural always comes to my mind.

that's an exaggerated meme on how your suppose to create a password and a reminder that you can't be so sure .. it's funny though, XD

 
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That's a good one. LOL.

 
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....interesting.... blood of a virgin....

 
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LOVED IT!! and shared, thanx ancient. All from MD5, Hash 1 - 100000237 to some personal credit card numbers, identity numbers, mothers name, dogs birth place and lastly the drop of virgin blood... :)

 
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The most common password is "123456"

 
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I use almost the same password for everything, very strong with upper case, lower case, numbers and special characters. And it's very easy for me to remember :)

 
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The most common password is "123456"

I used "12345" for the longest time on my Hotmail account. Then they changed the requirement to 8 characters and it became "12345678". :D

p.s. I use a much stronger password now, so don't bother trying either of those.

I use almost the same password for everything, very strong with upper case, lower case, numbers and special characters.

That's what most people do. Either that or cycle between a handful of passwords.

 
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I changed to using phrases. It doesn't take much to remember (or to type) something like "Open the pod bay doors, Hal". I'm sure it's a lot harder to crack than 123456 or qwerty.

LastMitch
Deleted Member
 
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I use almost the same password for everything, very strong with upper case, lower case, numbers and special characters. And it's very easy for me to remember :)

My password is my ex last name.

I do what AD does very strong with upper case, lower case, numbers and special characters.

 
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By revealing the base that you construct your password from, you have just weakened it considerably despite the use of mixed case, numericals and special characters (assuming that someone really wanted to crack your password, and that information regarding your past relationships can be found online).

Using the same thing for everything, no matter how strong it is thought to be, is never a good idea. If any one of the sites that the password is used for gets breached and that password exposed then it leaves everything else exposed as well.

 
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By revealing the base that you construct your password from, you have just weakened it considerably despite the use of mixed case, numericals and special characters

I doubt it, there aren't any other keys or characters available to use. There's 126 possible printable characters in the English (American) keyboard), if the password is 10 characters long, that means where are 126!/(10!*116!) possible combinations (assuming no duplicates).

 
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Either that or cycle between a handful of passwords.

^That.

LastMitch
Deleted Member
 
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By revealing the base that you construct your password from, you have just weakened it considerably despite the use of mixed case, numericals and special characters

You make a good point. I never thought about it in that the way. I do change my password once or twice a year.

(assuming that someone really wanted to crack your password, and that information regarding your past relationships can be found online).

After reading the last sentence. I gonna change my password every month.

126 possible printable characters in the English (American) keyboard), if the password is 10 characters long, that means where are 126!/(10!*116!) possible combinations (assuming no duplicates).

That's to deep for me to calualate the possibilty & combination.

 
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Most IT departments won't let you cycle passwords.
So I take my favorite word and mix it with numbers, like:
b1u2l3l4s5h6i7t

 
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So I take my favorite word and mix it with numbers, like:
b1u2l3l4s5h6i7t

I see into the future and Ene Uran's account has been hacked. :)

 
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There's 126 possible printable characters in the English (American) keyboard), if the password is 10 characters long, that means where are 126!/(10!*116!) possible combinations (assuming no duplicates).

Couldn't resist ...

from math import factorial
n_combinations = int(factorial(126)/(factorial(10)*factorial(116)))
print("{:,}".format(n_combinations))

''' result ...
192,657,357,567,675
'''

Actually, there are only 100 printable characters on a US keyboard so the number of combinations come down to a miserly 17,310,309,456,440

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