1.11M Members

My CIS degree, what can I do?

 
0
 

Hello, I am new to these forums.

My name is Sean.

I am currently getting my CIS degree at Tulane University here in New Orleans.
. I want to program, especially object oriented programming.

The CIS degree at my college has two paths you can take.

One is the "traditional track" which involves more with databases.

The other is the "progressive track" involves more in object oriented programming and software development.

I have already started on the "progressive" track. I was wondering a couple of things about it. I have a minimum of 48 credits that I have to take for the major. Here they are


UCIS 165 Introduction to Software Design
UCIS 291 Problem Solving with C++
UCIS 295 Problem Solving with Java
UCIS 306 Files and Data Structures
UCIS 322 Systems Analysis
UCIS 323 Systems Design
UCIS 342 Object-Oriented Analysis and Logical Design
UCIS 344 Database Management
UCIS 347 Database Administration
UCIS 348 Advanced Database Administration
UCIS 376 Object-Oriented Application Development
UCIS 374 Internet/Intranet Application Development
UCIS 379 Data Warehousing
UCIS 370 Application Development w. C/Unix
UCIS 373 Information Engineering
UCIS 375 Expert Systems Development

Now i know this degree program isnt going to be easy, especially since I have to take Calculus I, II, and II, and discrete mathematics along with it.

My question is, will these classes and this major really give me the cutting edge in the CIS field like my University says it will?

Is this program even worth doing, or should i just head back to the Computer Science program?

What jobs are available in this?
Are those jobs really needed?

 
0
 

Any input?

 
0
 

The cool thing about any degree is that you can work ANYWHERE with it. The thing with computers is certifications and experience. Without these you won't get as far as you would with em.

I have a BAS in CIS and currently work as a network consultant for a company that provides SME solutions. I only had 5 years of experience to apply toward a job...then I got the degree. That allowed me to go from help desk support and VNC help desk to where I am now. If I were to get a couple of certifications...I could probably venture out a bit further with larger companies and find my niche there...but I'm content for the time being.

Hope this helps.

 
0
 

Based on the courses you mentioned, you most likely will be able to find a decent programming job with the CIS degree. However, most cutting-edge companies will want to see a Comp Sci degree, even if you have the skills with the CIS degree.

If you are going to have to take Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, and discrete math regardless, I would go with computer science. It's a more respected degree (I feel). Usually the difference between computer science and a CIS programming degree is the amount of math involved.

If you were shaky on your math skills, and CIS offered a less math-intensive program, I would definitely say do that. But if both are making you go up to Calc III level, and if you're "smart" enough to make it past integral calculus, you should be able to handle computer science.

 
0
 

Become a professional chef. Concentrate on a fusion of Asian and American cuisine, with a hint of Middle Eastern.

 
0
 

anything you want

 
0
 

anything you want

I was serious. It is impossible to outsource a chef to overseas if you want JIT cooking.

Programming, DB administration, code development, and many other back office, soft activities can and will be pushed to areas where it is less costly. (Yes, I said stuff will get outsourced to overseas.)

As such, I would concentrate on a study area that requires a presence.

It is very very hard to fix a busted device accross the ocean. Either you have to have very very long arms, and see thousands of miles, or have to ship the device back and forth...

 
0
 

thanks for all the feedback.

However, I have decided to finish my education in computer science.

Thanks

 
0
 

I see that you've already made your decision, but some other things that you'll want to consider.

Depending on the school of thought, CS is a much more theoretical devotion than CIS/MIS/BIS involving more math. Most universities will provide a lot more business/human interaction skills in CIS/MIS/BIS than in CS. As an 8 systems analyst I have found that CS people are much more tuned to interface with the computers and do a REALLY good job at it, while CIS people are more tuned to interefacing with the people. So, that being said, if you want to get your hands dirty with the hardcore computer stuff, then definitely go with the CS degree. If you want to learn more about how businesses are run and how you can help corporations succeed in a practical sense then CIS may be more suited for you.

Of course there are exceptions to everything,

Andy

 
0
 

I am a day late and a dollar short (usually the case). I think that everyone should keep in mind that IF you want to make a good living (at LEAST a six figure salary) you won't want to be programming the rest of your days. Everyone MUST mature beyond the hands on programming stuff and move to the business end if they want to be anything other than a programmer. Don't get me wrong, I love what I do and I am good at it, but if I hadn't learned how to interface with people and the business, I would be stuck at a senior pgm'r level. Good luck in your CS dg.

 
0
 

Well, as stated right above, the futre of IT is NOT in the hands on programming, as programs begin to mature even more they will pretty much build themselves. Im not talking Termintaor 3 AI type of stuff, i am talking real life programming. We as IT Professinals job was to make things easier. We did it too well...

You dont have to be an expert to program, (Visual studio anyone?) just drop in an object or two, write a few lines you have a working program.. otherwise off shore it baby!

You dont have to be an expert in networking anymore, Anyone set up a lynksys wireless router lately. you can setup a wireless network in about 5 minutes and have 20 computers hitting the internet..... securly even.

Servers?, put in Windows 2003 disk, click mouse few times, wait about 40 minutes. Choose wizards bang you have... um lets see... a web server, a domain controller, file server, monekys can almost do it.

Where the money is understanding how these tools interact in business, how they impact business, how they can make the business run more efficiently, how that can ruduce overhead and get the most out of every minute they are running, how they can enable a knowledge worker to do so many things so efficiently that the business makes the most amount of money.

Take your degree and use that techbackground to prove to a company that you can create a better process.

Understand business, use your degree to get in the door, use your brain to find a better way to do somthing...


too long? i speak from experience,
The IT world changes every 5 years, business processes dont....what you know now wont be worth much in 5 years, keep learning and kep evolving.

 
0
 

Based on the courses you mentioned, you most likely will be able to find a decent programming job with the CIS degree. However, most cutting-edge companies will want to see a Comp Sci degree, even if you have the skills with the CIS degree.

If you are going to have to take Calculus I, Calculus II, Calculus III, and discrete math regardless, I would go with computer science. It's a more respected degree (I feel). Usually the difference between computer science and a CIS programming degree is the amount of math involved.

If you were shaky on your math skills, and CIS offered a less math-intensive program, I would definitely say do that. But if both are making you go up to Calc III level, and if you're "smart" enough to make it past integral calculus, you should be able to handle computer science.

I must disagree with the statement that CS degree's are more respected than CIS or MIS degrees.It depends on your long term career goals.If you want to sit in front of a computer all day for the rest of your life and code sure go the CS route because that's all you will really do.CIS and MIS degree's are more diverse with a business mix.Therefore, you get to see the business end of the company and the IT end.You aren't just stuck in a cube world typing out code.So I say if you want to be able to advance higher in a company's hierarchy, I would go MIS or CIS you have more value to the company.Because programmers come a dime a dozen, but programmers with business skills and people skills don't.And as for the math part of CS it's is over rated, because I work as the Lead Developer for a civil engineering firm and most programs I write have very little math involved.You aren't going to use much Cal III unless you go work for NASA or some scientific based company.So in the end I feel CIS or MIS are more well rounded degree's in the business and corporate world and CS degree's lock you into coding.

 
0
 

>> My CIS degree, what can I do?

It makes great fish wrap.

No i am not joking

I graduated 5 years ago at the top of my class from a very highly rated university. Have been unemployed almost constantly since.

People who run software websites have a vested interest in the field so they are not gonna be honest about how bad the market for programmers is

I could introduce you to boatload of unemployed programmers and I'm just one person.

Oh yeah the most common excuse you'll run into is that it's only the bad programmers that aren't working

Where would a propagandist be without his excuses right

 
0
 

I must disagree with the phrase " CS is a more respected degree " , it is not true. CS is more theoretical yes , IT is more administration stuff, what can you do with technology to help ABC company. My programming teacher in high school had a CS degree , is that the kind of respect you get when you get a CS degree??? :!: . :!: If you want a RESPECTED degree go for Computer Engineering :cool:
IT is a Computer science degree that tends to be more on the Tech/Business side.
Why would you bother taking Formal Languages and Automata Theory when you know you wont design a compiler in your life, come on people , wake up and smell the coffe , if you know your very smart , like Larry Page ( Google founder ) then yes a CS degree will be better . but if you know you'll only study CS to impress your friends and family then dont bother , cause your going to get a programming job like any other ordinary CS graduate( like most of you) :idea: where no one even cares whether you did Automata theory , and worst of all that the IT guy be your boss.

I personally went for the CS degree cause i like math. thinking i would design the next OS of the future, get down of the cloud , your just gonna be an ordinary programmer with just theory and programming skills and nothing else, not business knowledge etc. which employers wont reconize( that pisses me off ) . In my Opinion CS programs should include a little more of the courses that IT guys take , it will help a lot.
In the long run , the degree doesnt matter that much , it is the experience . and people skills are very important , unless you want to be a code monkey :)

 
0
 

If you were shaky on your math skills, and CIS offered a less math-intensive program, I would definitely say do that. But if both are making you go up to Calc III level, and if you're "smart" enough to make it past integral calculus, you should be able to handle computer science.

YOu clearly have no clue what your talking about, how come you compare CIS with CS , they are two different careers , its like comparing a biologist and a Bioengineer , taking more math doesnt mean more , it is just that one degree is designed for a specific purpose, based on your statements regarding math , any idiot could very easily pass through integral calculus , you are just underestimating CIS people skills.

With that attitude i dont think you 'll get anywhere.

SO before talking crap , think twice , poser :mad:

 
0
 

>> YOu clearly have no clue what your talking about

The whole thread is a waste. Just a bunch of alternative universe talk.

Get a friggin grip. Programming is a dead occupation. The fact that you can't deal with it and your gonna engage in denial to sooth your ego doesn't make any difference.

*****************************************************

http://mitchellconsulting.net/commonsense/?p=76

Enrollment in this dead occupation is down 60% between 2001 and 2005 (see link).

Ya get it now. Course knowing some of the hard core "can't face reality" types here they will probably insist that that means they are gonna be in big demand soon.

 
0
 

>> YOu clearly have no clue what your talking about

The whole thread is a waste. Just a bunch of alternative universe talk.

Get a friggin grip. Programming is a dead occupation. The fact that you can't deal with it and your gonna engage in denial to sooth your ego doesn't make any difference.

.

I am not saying that i cant deal with programming, thats easy stuff to me, i am doing Applied Math , which is a mix of CS ,applied statistics and pure math, i think i'll better off with this degree :p

 
0
 

>> I am not saying that i cant deal with programming

Yeah your problem seems to be reading comprehension.

A real gethering of geniuses here i can see.

 
0
 

>> I am not saying that i cant deal with programming

Yeah your problem seems to be reading comprehension.

A real gethering of geniuses here i can see.

go away , dipshit

 
0
 

go away , dipshit , and welcome to my IGGY list along with the other 999 idiots, :twisted: cocksucker :cheesy:
i dont want to hear one word of you , ok ,

read above

You
This article has been dead for over six months: Start a new discussion instead
Post:
Start New Discussion
Tags Related to this Article