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Ok the daniweb user list says theres 109771 members

if i do a search for how many users have made at least one post its only 37193


WTF ARE only 1/3 of users actualyl posting?

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Last Post by WaltP
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Yes, and it's not that surprising. In fact, the number of people that have more than 1 post is 20687 - a measly 18% of the registered.

The fact is, it's really easy to register, however, it's much harder to take the time to write a post, especially if you've never posted before. Most people don't have the time or whatever. Such a statistic is not unnormal; most forums are in the same boat (or more likely, worse).

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some of those registered users are really spammers whose posts have been deleted. I don't know if banned users are counted in that number or not. Some people register for the sole purpose of posting spam and have no intention of participating in DaniWeb community.

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>I don't know if banned users are counted in that number or not.
Yes they are - when a user is banned, that does not mean their user account no longer exists, all it means is that they are unable to post (as far as I know; I've never been banned so I wouldn't know).

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This is a common trend on all forums, like joeprogrammer said. Assuming most of them are not spam, it could be a situation wherein they come, sign up, find their answers, and leave.

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Many people register, bash their head against the wall in trying to find how to "Post a new thread", give up. End of story for them...

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What makes you think this? Serious question. I wouldn't have thought it was that difficult to post a new thread, and if they read the welcome guide it's even got a screenshot with a flaming big arrow pointing out which button to press.

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As to the general join but not post thing, a lot of this can be put down to the lurker effect whereby people come to read rather than post. Not uncommon, and with a resource the size and nature of DaniWeb rather to be expected I guess.

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What makes you think this?

There are a lot of people for whom forums are "completely new". They don't even know that the things which they are reading are called threads and that they themselves can create them.

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Which is why we have the welcome guide, and point people to it in the welcome message every new member gets. The guide could not be any simpler, big pictures with big arrows saying do this :)

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Which is why we have the welcome guide, and point people to it in the welcome message every new member gets. The guide could not be any simpler, big pictures with big arrows saying do this :)

A-ha ha. That's incredibly niave of you to think that happy_geek. The stats speak for themselves.

I bet ppl join up, can't figure how to post, (even after reading the introduction) eventually figure out how to post. Then come back another day only to forget which forum they actually posted in.

Dani said something to me when I suggested something really insanely simple to force ppl into using code tags in the software development forums ...and then the penny dropped - web users are stupid and most can't speak english.

If people find it difficult to post they'll go elsewhere

That's lost revenue.

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Something else to take into consideration is the amount of time it takes to post. It's not just that if people find it difficult to post they'll go elsewhere. It is also if people find it takes too much time to post they'll go elsewhere.

Take the following scenerio: Someone arrives at DaniWeb as a result of a google search. They want to ask a question. For argument's sake, assume they are familiar with forum systems, and they are able to navigate their way to the new thread button. They see they have to register. They click to the registration page and fill out the registration form. Now they have to wait for a confirmation email to activate their accounts. They open their email clients, and click on the link. Now they navigate back to DaniWeb where they see they got a new welcome private message. They visit their PM inbox to view it and see a nice welcome message from Davey. Now they navigate back to the forum they were initially interested in posting in ... where was it again? Do they still remember that quick question they wanted to ask?

Now imagine if all the user wanted to do was comment on a blog entry. They might have just wanted to do a one-off quick reply, but it wouldn't have been worth the time or effort to register even if they do know how to do it.

Of course, you can see that the biggest hurdle in the registration process is the confirmation email. Unfortunately, this is a required evil. It is important to me because I don't want to waste server resources sending emails to nonexistant accounts everyday. It's important to my ISP because they want to know that all mail my server sends out is from an opt-in list.

Roughly one third of all member registrations never make it through the email confirmation stage. People are at work, they want to ask a quick work-related question, they register ... then they realize that they can't post until they've clicked a link that was emailed to them, but they don't have access to their email accounts from work. So they give up.

Then there are of course the batch who just enter something silly like test@test.com in the email space, not realizing that they can't proceed unless they enter a real email. Then they decide it's just not worth their time to go into their preferences and bother changing it.

Of DaniWeb's 151,000 members, a little over 40,000 have never activated their email accounts and therefore don't have any of the membership benefits such as the ability to post.

Each of these members received three activation emails spread over a week's time before the system gave up on them. Additionally, if any of these activation emails bounced, they received a DaniWeb PM encouraging them to provide a new, valid email address.

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Many people register, bash their head against the wall in trying to find how to "Post a new thread", give up. End of story for them...

I guess I was really close on that one... ;)

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I guess I was really close on that one... ;)

Most people KNOW how to register and post. They just don't want to bother doing it because it takes less time to do a google search and find what they're looking for than to register, post, and wait for a reply.

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Most people KNOW how to register and post. They just don't want to bother doing it because it takes less time to do a google search and find what they're looking for than to register, post, and wait for a reply.

I agree 100% with Dani on this one. Forums are not the fastest way of finding an answer to question.

Even 15 minutes on Google will usually bring in tons more info on a particular topic than a forum thread will in weeks (provided it even lasts that long). In fact, Google is usually my first resource for solving my tech problems, whereas forums are my last.

However, I do have to give the credit to forums that they can usually solve your problem, assuming that you've posted in a forum that specializes enough in the topic, and you've taken the time to ask a good question.

Right now the main reason I visit forums is to socialize and have fun, which I not only do in the lounges, but also when I help people in troubleshooting forums or programming forums. Most people don't have time for this kind of thing (and usually the first thing that comes to mind when "forum" is mentioned is "help"), and besides, MSN seems to be the most popular thing for socializing over the internet these days.

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Most people KNOW how to register and post. They just don't want to bother doing it because it takes less time to do a google search and find what they're looking for than to register, post, and wait for a reply.

I guess you missed the joke.... ;)

MSN seems to be the most popular thing for socializing over the internet these days.

There are a lot of other ways, chatting (yahoo, msn, gmail) being the most prevelant.

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>There are a lot of other ways, chatting (yahoo, msn, gmail) being the most prevelant
I tend to use "msn" to generalize the use of instant messaging these days. ;)

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> I guess I did. Enlighten me?

The abstract of my first post (people don't know how to use forums) was way off the mark of what you said (they know how to use it, they just don't bother). That's why I said "I guess I was really close on that one", simply because I wasn't..... ;)

> I tend to use "msn" to generalize the use of instant messaging these days.

I used the generic word chatting, since the popularity of IM's depends on the country you live in. In our country, a majority of people use Yahoo and Gmail Talk as compared to msn. I guess it must be msn at your place.

Oh, wait, did I just use newsgroup style quoting...curse you.... :D

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>I guess it must be msn at your place.
Most definitely. There's not a single person that I know that uses something other than msn, which is kind of unfortunate.

>Oh, wait, did I just use newsgroup style quoting...curse you...
My evil plan is working ... BWAHAHA!!! :twisted:

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Each of these members received three activation emails spread over a week's time before the system gave up on them. Additionally, if any of these activation emails bounced, they received a DaniWeb PM encouraging them to provide a new, valid email address.

And what good is a DaniWeb PM if they can't get registered?

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>And what good is a DaniWeb PM if they can't get registered?
Isn't it something like you can log in and check your private messages but you can't post unless you've activated your account?

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Yes, I believe it is that way. Otherwise there is no point in sending PM's.

But there is one minor doubt regarding this. If you will look at old threads, you will find many posts posted by members who are "unregistered" .

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>If you will look at old threads, you will find many posts posted by members who are "unregistered" .
Which forum were they from? I believe that the Geek's Lounge originally didn't require users to register in order to post, so as to encourage more people to post. Then due to abuse and spamming the feature was disabled.

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I can't as such recollect the specific thread / forum but I have seen those things around. But then again, you might be right. Daniweb in those days was not as big as it is right now, so very much possible.

Dani might be in a better position to provide a more accurate answer.

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on the subject of IM

im a student so we use it alot :) and i dont know a single person who doesnt use msn

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