This Memorial Day weekend reminds us all of those who sacrificed their lives for freedom and to protect a way of life that is based on freedom. While considering the brave men and women who stood up for what is right over the past 250 years, it made me realize a similar thing about Linux. No one has given his life for Linux but certainly there have been sacrifices. But, like their armed soldier counterparts, it isn't about the sacrifice, it's the freedom you big dummy. We have the freedom to choose the operating system we use on our computers. …

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The Software Freedom Law Center (SFLC) took aim at 14 consumer electronics companies for violating GPL licensed products. This is the largest lawsuit of its kind ever filed. This lawsuit uses what Richard Stallman calls "tivoization" as its defense. Tivoization, if you recall from my post, "[URL="http://www.daniweb.com/news/story240080.html"]Does Linus Torvalds Hate Freedom?[/URL]" involves the use of GPL licensed software with a product without allowing the user access to the source code and thereby preventing the user from changing that code--two very important stipulations of the GPL and in the definition of free software. I also made the following observation in that …

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Do you need a reality check? Freedom isn't free. You have to work hard, and possibly even die, for it. Fortunately, free software doesn't require you to sacrifice anything but restrictions. Unfortunately, the powerful marketing machines constantly bombard and tempt you with semi-clever TV commercials, discount offers, inexpensive upgrades or feature hype in order to restrict your freedom. Purchasing proprietary operating systems and applications restrict you without cause. Actually, that isn't 100 percent true. There is a cause. You're restricted with the intent of imprisoning you and making you conform to their version of reality. That's the opposite of freedom. …

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I was talking with my friend, [URL="http://blogs.zdnet.com/perlow"]Jason Perlow[/URL], yesterday and he told me that I should back off of the free software rants because he feels that I'm entering the gray edges of freakdom. We laughed about it but it made me think: When does a strong belief in something become extremism? I've had two conversations with Richard Stallman about free software specifically and freedom generally. My conclusion is that there's a fine line between freedom and freakdom. My goal is to find that line and explore its dimensions. My first conversation with Richard Stallman (RMS) was a tentative discussion, …

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According to an ongoing debate over the GPL version 3, he does. How can this be, since Linus Torvalds, creator and chief architect of the Linux kernel, knows about software freedom and free software? He doesn't have a problem with what Richard Stallman refers to as "tivoization," which is the practice of using software available under the terms of a copyleft license but prevents the user/owner from modifying that code through the use of protections. Stallman believes that this is a blatant violation of your freedom. Linus disagrees. Stallman's argument: [COLOR="Green"][QUOTE]One major danger that GPLv3 will block is tivoization. Tivoization …

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I had the honor and pleasure of speaking to [URL="http://www.fsf.org"]Richard Stallman[/URL] a few days ago while he was in New Zealand on a speaking tour. I had been in an email conversation with him over several days asking about which software programs he uses and I finally connected with him for some clarification and more details. So, if you've ever wanted to get the scoop straight from the man himself, you'll want to listen to the [URL="http://www.frugaltechshow.com/stallman"]podcast[/URL]. The conversation begins abruptly because the phone conversation is a continuation of that email dialog. We also got cut off at one point …

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Over the last week or so, I've been exploring cloud computing. My basic thesis through this series has been that as the economy sours--it's darn close to curdling--cloud computing gives you access to sophisticated applications without expensive hardware. Sounds like a smart play on the face of it, but when [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Richard_Stallman"]Richard Stallman[/URL], the Dean of the [URL="http://www.fsf.org/"]free software [/URL]movement weighs in that [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry3277.html"]it's actually stupid[/URL], it's going to make you stand up and take notice. So to get yet another view on all of this, I had a chat with Rishi Chandra, the product manager for Google Docs Enterprise. [B]Perception …

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The End.