In case you missed it Google has a serious problem with Symantec SSL certificates and is removing their Greenbar status in Chrome as well as rolling out "not trusted" notices for sites using mis-issued certs by Symantec. https://techcrunch.com/2017/03/27/google-is-fighting-with-symantec-over-encrypting-the-internet/ In response to the problems Namecheap is offering free replacement of the certificates - you get whatever time is left on your Symantec SSL certificate on a Comodo SSL for free. https://www.namecheap.com/security/symantec-ssl-certificate-free-replacement.aspx

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Hi!! I would like to know if I could get someone's help. My computer, which is connected to an internal web, had a detected security risk, so Symantec Antivirus was installed to make a clean-up. Nevertheless, after the installation, a couple of messages appear every time I initiate the computer, saying that there's a failure with "C:DOCUME~1userLOCALS~1applic~1micros~2winini~1.exe" specified in the registry. Also, even after the antivirus update and scannings, there is a message that appears 2-3 times per minute over the Symantec Endpoint Protection in the Desktop Bar, indication,saying "[SID:24142] System Infected: Trojan Download Request detected" [] . Nothing happens …

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Symantec today launched a new hosted security as a service solution for small and medium sized business in the form of its '[URL="http://www.messagelabs.com/trials/hep"]Symantec Hosted Endpoint Protection[/URL]' offering. Delivering a simple and convenient cloud-based service covering Windows-based laptops, desktops and files servers, the solution aims to protect these endpoint systems using advanced technologies for antivirus, antispyware, firewall, and host intrusion prevention all managed from a single online management console. Symantec Hosted Endpoint Protection features include: [LIST] [*]Always-on Protection for Endpoints: Automated updates occur transparently over an Internet connection to keep employee systems current and consistent with client policies when employees are …

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According to the [URL="http://www.symantec.com/connect/pt-br/blogs/password-survey-results"]latest poll[/URL] into password habits conducted by security vendor Symantec, some 26 percent of folk have told their spouse what their passwords are. Perhaps less surprisingly, 12 percent have told their IT admin and 5 percent their boss. However, why 10 percent let their friends and 8 percent their co-workers know is beyond me. Do people not actually understand what a password is for, and if not for keeping access secure and private then why bother in the first place? Mind you, of the 400 people who took part in the password survey, 23 percent use their …

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The latest research from security vendor Symantec would appear to suggest that cybercrime gangs are now applying drug smuggling techniques to their trade, and are actively using 'malware mules' in order to distribute threats within social friendship networks. According to the latest Internet Security Threat Report, email accounts are now being sold for just 65p on the underground web black market, and these are then used to distribute spam or malware via people’s trusted network of contacts. The advertised prices of email accounts in 2009 ranged between 65p and £13 for each account. Most advertisements listed a flat rate, although …

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Today the cyber security experts at [URL="http://www.symantec.com/about/news/release/article.jsp?prid=20100322_01"]Norton announced the top 10 riskiest U.S. cities for cybercrime[/URL]. The next time you pay a bill or update your status on Facebook you might want to look over your shoulder [virtually]. It seems Seattle, Boston, San Francisco and Washington D.C. are the riskiest all around cybercrime cities, thanks in part to the large number of Wi-Fi hotspots. [B]Let’s have a look at the top 10:[/B] 1) Seattle 2) Boston 3) Washington, D.C. 4) San Francisco 5) Raleigh, N.C. 6) Atlanta 7) Minneapolis 8) Denver 9) Austin, TX 10) Portland, OR The above rankings …

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As a FOSS (Free, Open Source Software) advocate, I find myself in a state of shock over what I've observed over the past ten or so years in this realm. If I asked you to name the most successful open source companies (Companies that derive the majority of their income from open source software), which ones would you name? [URL="http://www.redhat.com"]Red Hat[/URL]? [URL="http://www.novell.com"]Novell[/URL]? [URL="http://www.mysql.com"]MySQL[/URL]? [URL="http://www.canonical.com"]Canoncial[/URL]? Those are all great answers. These three are perhaps the best known and most successful of all the companies that derive their incomes from open source software. Now, what if I asked you to name the …

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Wow. That's quite a statistic, but there it is in front of me jumping off the pages of the latest [URL="http://bit.ly/b2rUFg"]global State of Enterprise Security study[/URL] from Symantec. The two lines shining so brightly and grabbing my attention read "75 percent of organizations experienced cyber attacks in the past 12 months" and "these attacks cost enterprise businesses an average of $2 million per year". I'll say it again, wow! Maybe that is not so surprising when you consider that the report states that every enterprise, yes 100 percent, experienced cyber losses in 2009. The top three losses being intellectual property …

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[URL="http://www.symantec.com"]Symantec[/URL] has published one of those rare things - a report that contains an actual surprise. It seems some 4 million people have fallen for Scareware in the last 12 months. I'm stunned. Not because people are installing fake antivirus systems. That's a shame but in some ways it's inevitable; people on their own will fall for scams. No, what alarms me is that the IT community (and if we include journalists and bloggers that's all of us) are doing so little to dissuade them. It wouldn't take much. An email sent to all remote workers reminding them that not …

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You probably call it Halloween, for myself and other pagans it is [URL="http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Samhain"]Samhain[/URL], but for the cyber-gangs it is phishing time. Seasonally-themed spam is on the up at this time of the year, Halloween related messages accounting for 0.5% of the daily spam traffic by volume in mid-October according to the latest [URL="http://www.messagelabs.com/intelligence.aspx"]Symantec MessageLabs Intelligence Report[/URL]. Currently, with the 'Witch's New Year' Sabbath itself coming this weekend, there are some 500 million emails circulating worldwide and the majority of the Halloween spam is originating from the [URL="http://www.itwire.com/content/view/19931/53/"]Rustock[/URL] and Donbot [URL="http://www.itwire.com/content/view/24603/1231/"]botnets[/URL]. Most of this would appear to be pointing towards pharmaceutical …

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According to the latest [URL="http://www.messagelabs.com/mlireport/MLIReport_2009.07_July_FINAL.pdf"]MessageLabs Intelligence Report[/URL] from Symantec, things are looking good as web malware writers have taken a sabbatical. Unfortunately the spammers have gone multi-lingual in a lazy-ass automated kind of a way with great effect. Spam levels have, say Symantec, stayed at their highest level for two years at 90 percent on average. France, Germany and the Netherlands are suffering more than the rest of us, with spam levels now hitting more than 95 percent. The MessageLabs research folk reckon they know why, and it comes down to those lazy-ass spammers using automated translation services and templates …

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You might have seen the announcement [URL="http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/technology/8116387.stm"]yesterday[/URL] that Microsoft is going to start offering free antivirus protection to its customers. The initial reaction is no doubt going to be reasonably positive, and speaking as someone with a family member who's been hit by a computer virus fairly recently, the easier they make this stuff for consumers, the better. I'm a little concerned, though, by a few things about this announcement. First, let's assume this software ends up shipping with Windows eventually so everyone with a Windows PC has it. Leaving aside the damage this will do to the competition (and …

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A new [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4387.html"]Symantec[/URL] survey has discovered that people are more likely to check the oil in their car than they are to back up valuable data. When you consider that our computers are so much more than mere work machines, that they have become very much woven into the fabric of our lives as both 'life storage' facilities and some might even argue 'emotional hubs' that contain our digital souls, it is rather surprising that we are so lax about backing it all up. But, despite admitting to feelings of anger and upset when [URL="http://www.daniweb.com/blogs/entry4376.html"]data is lost[/URL], the survey participants …

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The latest Symantec [URL="http://www.messagelabs.com/intelligence.aspx"]MessageLabs Intelligence Report[/URL] has landed on my desk and makes for the usual rather depressing reading. I guess that most depressing of all, if not surprising when you take a look at your inbox or worse still your junk folder, are the figures relating to spam activity during May 2009. It would appear that spam has managed to hit a new low by reaching a new high, and what a high: up 5.4 percent on the previous month to peak at representing some 90.4 percent of all email by volume. That really does suck elephants through a …

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Symantec's research on the apparent rise in the 'black market' for goods on the Internet makes for interesting reading. That's 'interesting' if we take it to mean 'nothing much has happened so we might as well read it in case there are any odd findings'. The interesting thing for me is not that £3.3 billion is being squirreled away by people using stolen credit card details, nor even that people are selling dodgy details online (I wonder if anyone pays for dodgy details with a dodgy credit card?) It's not even that organised crime might be involved. Depressing though it …

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Some are feeling the pinch of the credit crunch and cutting their spending accordingly, others continue to spend, spend, spend. Symantec would appear to fall into the latter category as it has announced a definitive agreement to acquire online messaging and Web security specialist MessageLabs for a purchase price of around $695 million in cash. This breaks down to a couple of payments, one for $154 million in US Dollars and another for around £310 million in UK Pounds Sterling. Not that MessageLabs isn't a good buy. It apparently generated $145 million in revenue during the financial year ending July …

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The End.