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Psh, did it in binary.

Could you give a link to the language Psh or at least what is stands for?

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http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=psh

And by the way, if you can figure this out:

01010101
10001001 11100101
00110001 11000000
11001001
11000011

Free rep. Here's a cheat sheet: http://ref.x86asm.net/coder32.html

According to your reference it seems to be the following although it appears some integers are missing from the original binary sequence as the below translation makes invalid syntax due to the missing integers from the source.

PUSH
MOV IN
XOR ROL
LEAVE
RETN
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No, C++ is not dying at all. Langpop.com shows it in the top 5 on most of the results charts.

Indeed but those statistics show what's being used by the public and not what's being used by the industry. Big difference. The public sector are like children learning to hack or make games where as the industry are making operating systems and tools to make games which is not present on those statistics.

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Indeed but those statistics show what's being used by the public and not what's being used by the industry. Big difference. The public sector are like children learning to hack or make games where as the industry are making operating systems and tools to make games which is not present on those statistics.

That's true, but the public have made some good stuff too. In my opinion, Linux is a great example of the public making industry-strength software, and it being widely adopted by the industry.

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Indeed but those statistics show what's being used by the public and not what's being used by the industry. Big difference. The public sector are like children learning to hack or make games where as the industry are making operating systems and tools to make games which is not present on those statistics.

I think its opposite of what you are saying. "Public", the kids that try to learn to hack, use C# and Java, but "real" developers use C++.

operating systems and tools to make games

You just mentioned 2 areas where C++ is used the most. Did you ever see a OS written in Java or C#? :D It is impossible. Same with games. The games need all the power of the computer, and you cannot achieve speed of C++ with Java or C#. C++ will not die out as long as there is programs that need to use full capabilities of the computer.
Internet Browsers, FPS games, Compilers, OSes, scientific programs, servers (Apache, PHP, nginx) and some other things.

The key is to use right tools for the right jobs.

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"Public", the kids that try to learn to hack, use C# and Java, but "real" developers use C++.

Stereotyping programmers by their choice of language is silly.

Did you ever see a OS written in Java or C#?

Yes, actually, I've seen both. One could potentially argue that the big name operating systems aren't written in Java or C# because they were created before either language was mature enough to be a practical choice.

The games need all the power of the computer, and you cannot achieve speed of C++ with Java or C#.

You should probably update yourself on the state of game development. Well, either that or recognize that games are no longer just about the PC.

The key is to use right tools for the right jobs.

It's also important to keep an open mind and avoid being prejudiced against languages for no real reason.

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I'm no great fan of C++ but rather than awaiting the death of C++ I would much rather see the demise of programmers who write butt-ugly code regardless of the language. My elder son recently completed his PhD in computational bio-physics and I perused a lot of C++ code over the last four years. No white space, little documentation and almost no comments - at least that was the case when he inherited the code base that he enhanced. I know it is possible to write undecipherable code in any language but some languages (like C++) seem to encourage it.

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Yes, actually, I've seen both. One could potentially argue that the big name operating systems aren't written in Java or C# because they were created before either language was mature enough to be a practical choice.

You said you seen both, but you did not name even one. By definition C# includes all the Microsoft classes and functions, so if you make a OS written in C# or Java you will have to take out a lot of the features, which will not be the real C# or Java anymore. Pointers and low-level functions are required for OS development, so if one writes an OS in Java or C# that would be one of the worst counter-examples of "right tools for the right job".

You should probably update yourself on the state of game development. Well, either that or recognize that games are no longer just about the PC.

Again, I don't know much about X-box and XNA, but I heard XNA is slower and is not used by big games, only for beginners. But I DO know PS3 does not have C# and it uses C++ for the games.

It's also important to keep an open mind and avoid being prejudiced against languages for no real reason.

Thats true. I never said otherwise. I know Python and trying to learn C#, but using new languages for programming just because they are new, not because of the language itself, is pretty silly too. :) I am not saying C++ is the best choice for every program, for example programs with a lot of GUI or Windows-only programs usually should be written with C#, but this does not change the fact that OSes and Servers, and Internet Browsers should still be written in C++.

I know it is possible to write undecipherable code in any language but some languages (like C++) seem to encourage it.

Sadly, I h ave to agree with you :(

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You said you seen both, but you did not name even one.

Those interested can google it. They're not exactly so obscure as to not come up on a mindless web search.

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By definition C# includes all the Microsoft classes and functions, so if you make a OS written in C# or Java you will have to take out a lot of the features, which will not be the real C# or Java anymore.

That is not true. All of the microsoft classes and functions must still have their assemblies/libraries referenced to be used in code.

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C/C++ is not dying..it is very used specially in Operating System development.If you major in Computer Science you will have to know it very well..specially if you want to work has OS developer.

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Holy crap!
You can't really replace a language with another language unless you either do a one-to-one mapping of their feature sets, in which case the replacement language would be completely redundant and hence still-born, or extend the original language (like C++ and C), in which case your replacement language would have to offer significant advantages to be seriously considered.

The Java/.NET philosophy is a wonderful idea, but all it does is restrict the scope for which you would reasonably choose C++ over it.

language bashing is moronic. There are truly ancient languages, older than C/C++, that are still alive and kicking because they fill a particular niche better than anything else. Whether they fill your niche or not doesn't have any bearing on whether they're actually good or not.

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Holy crap!
You can't really replace a language with another language unless you either do a one-to-one mapping of their feature sets, in which case the replacement language would be completely redundant and hence still-born, or extend the original language (like C++ and C), in which case your replacement language would have to offer significant advantages to be seriously considered.

The Java/.NET philosophy is a wonderful idea, but all it does is restrict the scope for which you would reasonably choose C++ over it.

language bashing is moronic. There are truly ancient languages, older than C/C++, that are still alive and kicking because they fill a particular niche better than anything else. Whether they fill your niche or not doesn't have any bearing on whether they're actually good or not.

I disagree. I would have to say that every language that can add, subtract, multiplay, devide and use binary operators have the capability of doing anything that any other language can do. After all, software is just binary digits processed as numbers. The main difference is efficiency. Sure you can have a language that does nothing but math however it wouldn't be very efficient to use a precompiled compiler like all languages except some assembly compilers do. So that is my conclusion.

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The main difference is efficiency.

which could still be an extension of the original language like i earlier stated

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