Hi,

if i had a string (Iamhere) stored in an array of characters, and i want to get just (amhere) in another array, is there a way of doing it?? I've been reading in the string functions but couldn't figure out how this is done?

Thanks

Thank you,
but isn't strstr used when a string is already known, i'm trying to find a general case to start copying from the second element but it doesn't seem to be working i wrote this piece of code

/*get the required text after the operation*/
     char mystring[100];
     char *text;
     length=strlen(mystring)-1;
    /*to copy everything after the first character*/
    memcpy(text, mystring+1, length);
    /*make last element is a null*/
    text[length]='/0';
    printf("Substring is %s\n",text);

The code returns the substring but also returns garbage after it

A little more information always helps.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main( void )
{
	char src[] = "Iamhere";
	char dst[ sizeof src - 1];
	char *result;

   /* point to the next char in string */
	result = &src[1];

   /* copy string */
	strcpy( dst, result );

   /* test destination string */
	printf( "dst = %s\n", dst );

	return 0;
}

Thank you very much, it worked perfect =)

Thank you very much, it worked perfect =)

It all depends of what you want to do with it.
You can even get away without a pointer for less typing.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>

int main( void )
{
     char text[] = "Iamhere";
     char subs[ sizeof text - 1 ];

     strcpy( subs, &text[1] );
     printf( "subs says %s\n", subs );
     return 0;
}

Thank you,

Another question i've been trying to do it as a separate function but the compiler gives back an error

char *returntext(char t[])
{   char text[100], *ftext;
    text=&t[1];
    strcpy(ftext,text);
    return (ftext);
}

where t was originally an array of 100 elements,
gcc returns
incompatible types in assignment

where t was originally an array of 100 elements,
gcc returns
incompatible types in assignment

text=&t[1]; ---> text is an array of chars and you are trying to use it as a pointer.
Furthermore you have to be carefully with trying to return pointers to variables created inside a function block, since as soon as the function is finished that variable doesn't exist anymore.
i.e. char text[100] will disappear when returntext() is finished.

strcpy(ftext,text); I am afraid that won't work neither. ftext is an uninitialized pointer, who knows to what is pointing to. Trying to change the content of what ftext points to will produce a segmentation fault.

Let me see if I can help you without divulging the actual code.
I believe you can benefit of looking at the function strcpy() as an example. Essentially, your customized function need to be prototyped the same way.
char *strcpy( char *s1, char *s2 );
strcpy accepts a pointer to a destination string and a pointer to a source string, both variables need to exist before you can pass it to strcpy; and only then it will do its work on them and return a pointer to the destination string, which still exist beforehand.
Hope that helps.

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