I've been reading an article but the code is written in C language which I don't get at all...

The code is:

void traverse(Tptr p) 
{    if (!p) return; 
     traverse(p->lokid); 
     if (p->splitchar) 
         traverse(p->eqkid); 
     else 
         printf("%s/n", (char *) p->eqkid); 
     traverse(p->hikid);

Someone please translate it to python...

Oh sweet Jesus! Years ago they used to pester us with stuff like this. C syntax can be real ugly, and your example is one of the best examples of ugly C syntax.

Comments
I concur
def traverse(p):
	try:
		p
	except NameError:
		traverse(p=lokid)
	if (p==splitchar):
		traverse(p=eqkid)
	else:
		print p
		traverse(p=hikid)

I think this is what you would want... someone correct me though... I thought it was good, but then I reread it and I'm a little drunk...

What I am confused about is, two lines into the function, it says restart the function...

I've been reading an article but the code is written in C language which I don't get at all...

The code is:

void traverse(Tptr p) 
{    if (!p) return; 
     traverse(p->lokid); 
     if (p->splitchar) 
         traverse(p->eqkid); 
     else 
         printf("%s/n", (char *) p->eqkid); 
     traverse(p->hikid);

Someone please translate it to python...

A word to word translation would go like this

def traverse(p):
    if not p:
        return
    traverse(p.lokid)
    if p.splitchar:
        traverse(p.eqkid)
    else:
        print(p.eqkid)
    traverse(p.hikid)

So, looking at your translation, would you agree with me when I say this code is broken?

This code isn't broken it's a recursive function

This code isn't broken it's a recursive function

yes, but because of the traverse(p->lokid); two lines into the function, it restarts itself over and over until the end when the fact that p is not defined forces a return. There is no way for it to get to the code after the second line, because it always restarts itself.

You must think recursively! These calls are all stacked so once it traverses to the outer-most or lower-most children, p becomes none, so it returns. When it returns, the function that called it can then proceed past that traverse(p->lokid) call.

You see this thing travels to all of the children, and then starts doing what it needs to do. And it looks like it's a tertiary (triary? I'm not sure which word is correct) search as opposed to binary search.

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