I need to write a program that asks the user to enter a string and then ask the user to enter a character. The following steps each need to have separate functions...

• Check the validity of the character
• The program should display the index number of the character
• The program should display the number of occurrences of the character
• The program should replace the character with a letter ‘T’ and display the new string
• Program should display the length of the string
• Program should convert the letter ‘T’ to ‘t’ and display the new string

I'm running into a problem when trying to display multiple indices; is there any way I can avert using pointers? I'm pretty sure I'm reinventing the wheel here...

//stringArray.cpp


#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <cstring>
#include <cctype>

using namespace std;

//prototypes
int isalpha( int ch );
bool validateChar(char);
char getChar();
int displayCharIndex(char [], int, char);
int getLength(char [] , int);

int main()
{
      //Variables
      char singleChar;
      //int size = 0;
      char charArray[50];
      int stringLength;
      int index = 0;
      
      //main
      cout << "Enter a string:  ";
      cin >> charArray;
      cout << "\nYou entered " << charArray;
      
      //enter char prompt
      cout << "\n\nEnter an alphabetic character to search for within the string:  ";
      cin >> singleChar;
      
      do
      {
          if (validateChar(singleChar))
          {
               cout << "\nThe character you entered, '" << singleChar << "' is valid.\n";
          }
          else
          {
               cout << "\nThe character you entered was not valid.\n\n";
               singleChar = getChar();
          }
      }while(!validateChar(singleChar));
      
      index = displayCharIndex(charArray, 50, singleChar);
      cout << "\n\nThe index of the character is " << index;
      
      //display number of occurrences of character
      
      
      
      //replace the character with letter 'T' and display new string
      
      

      
      stringLength = getLength(charArray, 50);
      cout << "\n\nThe length of the string is " << stringLength;
      
      //convert the letter 'T' to 't' and display string
      
      
      cout << "\n\n";
      system("PAUSE");
}

char getChar()
{
     char input;
     cout << "\n\nEnter an alphabetic character to search for within the string:  ";
     cin >> input;
     return input;
}

//check validity of character
bool validateChar(char ch)
{
     if(isalpha(ch))
         return true;
     else
         return false;
}

//index of char in string
int displayCharIndex(char strArray[], int size, char ch)
{
    cout << "**INDEXING**";
    char *strchr( const char *str, int ch );
    cout << "\n\nPointer = " << *strchr;
    return *strchr;
}
    
//display length of the string
int getLength(char strArray[], int size)
{
    int count = 0;
    count = strlen(strArray);
    return count;
}

Hi

Ok in no particular order a few problems with this code + the fix for your compile problem. (I hope)

the do { } while loop in main is a double test, try something like

int flag;
do
  {
     singleChar=getChar();
     flag=validateChar(singleChar);
     if (flag)
        std::cout<<"valid"<<std::endl;
      else
         std::cout<<"no valid"<<std::endl;
} while (flag);

That way you don't call validateChar twice on the same code.

displayCharIndex is wrong because the ine
char* strchr .... is a function declaration (function returning char*)
you want something like....

int 
displayCharIndex(char strArray[], int size, char ch)
{
char* strchr; 
//search code 
//make strchr point to the first instance of ch in strArray
// ...
return strchr-strArray;

I am guessing this is an assignment so I haven't written the search code for you. If you make an attempt and get stuck, please re-post.
Additionally, since you are using the stdio calls (strlen etc). Don't name your variables similar names e.g. strchr. You will get into a mess later.

This question has already been answered. Start a new discussion instead.