I have been up for 24+ hrs, and am failing to see where I'm getting these junk numbers from?
I know it's staring me right in the face, I just can't see it for the life of me!!
Keep in mind this code is ugly and may make your eyes bleed, I just have a very sloppy style at the moment.

// Week4Lab_RyanRodgers.cpp : main project file.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;


class Time
{
public:
	
	Time(int hour, int minute); //constructor w/ parameters
	Time(); //default constructor
	void setTime(int hour, int minute);
	void getTime(int&, int&);
	void printTime();

private:
	int hr, min; //declare hour & min
};

class Date
{
public:
	Date(int month, int day, int year);
	Date();
	void getDate(int&mm, int&dd, int&yy);
	void setDate(int month = 0, int day = 0, int year = 0);
	void printDate();
private:
	int month;
	int day;
	int year;
};

class Event
{
public:
	void setEventData(string eventName, int hour, int minute, int month, int day, int year);
	void printEventData();
	Event (string eventName = "", int hour = 0, int minute = 0, int month = 0, int day = 0, int year = 1900); //constructor
private:
	string eventName; 
	Date eventDate; //date object
	Time eventTime; //event object composed of time object
};

Time::Time() { int hour = 0,minute = 0; }
Time::Time(int hour, int minute) { hour = hr; minute = min; }
void Time::getTime(int &hour, int &minute){ hr = hour; min = minute; }
void Time::setTime(int hour, int minute){ hour = hr; minute = min; }
void Time::printTime()
{
	int hr, min;
	getTime (hr, min);
	if(hr<10) cout << "0";
	cout << hr << " : ";
	if(min<10) cout << "0";
	cout << min;
}

Date::Date(){month = day = 1; year = 1900;}
Date::Date(int m, int d, int y):month(m), day(d), year(y){ };
void Date::getDate(int&mm, int&dd, int&yy){mm = month; dd = day; yy = year;}
void Date::setDate(int mm, int dd, int yy){month = mm; day = dd; year = yy;}
void Date::printDate()
{
	int mm, dd, yy;
	getDate(mm, dd, yy);
	if(mm<10) cout << "0";
	cout << mm << "/";
	if(dd<10) cout << "0";
	cout << dd << "/";
	if(yy<100) cout << "20";
	cout << year;
}

Event::Event(string name, int hour, int minute, int month, int day, int year):eventTime(hour,minute), eventDate(month, day, year)

{
	eventName = name;
}

void Event::setEventData(string name, int hr, int min, int mm, int dd, int yy)
{
	string eventName = name;
	eventTime.setTime(hr, min);
	eventDate.setDate(mm, dd, yy);
}

void Event::printEventData()
{
	cout << eventName << " occurs ";
	eventDate.printDate();
	cout << " at ";
	eventTime.printTime();
}

int main()
{
	Event myEvent("My 100th Birthday", 4,19,7,21,74);
	myEvent.setEventData("My 100th Birthday", 4,19,7,21,74);
	myEvent.printEventData();
	cout << "\n" << endl;
	return 0;
}

Everything comes out great except the time. It's like, 1241872 : 2045197120

Take a look at this code:

Time::Time() { int hour = 0,minute = 0; }
Time::Time(int hour, int minute) { hour = hr; minute = min; }
void Time::getTime(int &hour, int &minute){ hr = hour; min = minute; }
void Time::setTime(int hour, int minute){ hour = hr; minute = min; }

All of the assignments seem to be backwards.

Also just a little suggestion because I think this is the root of your problem: use consistency in naming variables. If you use complete words as member variables in one class, do the same in other classes, instead of abbreviations.