For starters, mine is C#, closely followed by VB.NET

A wry smile followed when I read that some one had suggested English.
As it happens I used to use the language called Userbase, which is little known but was used on VAX/VMS systems, closely linked with the RMS database format.
I quite like Java though.

Oh yes I remember the VAX system and the green screens and the ability to split the screens!

I used to program PASCAL on PDP-11 and VAX
but the language I've used the most (and still am using) is LISP in the AutoCAD environment....

Pascal on a VAX, now that brings back some memories...
Not as much as Cobol on a Tandem, but older still :)

I did COBOL on an IBM 1130 way back in 1969
Mind you, on of my most interesting job I did was to « reverse engieneer » a program on a PDP-11 in order to replace the rig with a PC. An just as to show who ineficient Windows can be, the database access on the PDP-11 was within one to two seconds. The same type of access using MSAccess on a PentiumII-233 over Windows 2000 took between five and 18 seconds..... Like my ol' friend use to say « Expansion backward »

Edited 6 Years Ago by Ghost_Buster: n/a

Assembly although i am not as proficient in it as i am in C/C++. I'm also rather fond of basic though again not much experience.

yeah sucks i didnt grow up during those days. i wish i did education system was better in the us now most everyone has minimal knowledge of computers. but alas i cant change the past.

For starters, mine is C#, closely followed by VB.NET

I like J because it allows me to accomplish things quickly. It's somewhat exasperating to read the posts on this site from people requesting help with very simple problems which often seem to require pages of code to solve when it would require only a line or two of J.
See jsoftware.com for more info.

You'll look stupid when you say C#.NET, because that's not an actual term people use. So you should just say C# in the future.

My favorites are Python, Icon and Lisp, of which I have most used actually used Python, even I learned about (but did not actually program with) Lisp first.

1980's I programed BASIC with z90 ASSEMBLY, so now you know that I am brain damaged, but maybe learning about LISP protected me little.

Pascal I have maybe used most, but now I am spoiled with Pythons easy and simplicity.

Just out of interest, what are LISP and Python used for and what does the language look like-what does it resemble most?

My favorites are Python, Icon and Lisp, of which I have most used actually used Python, even I learned about (but did not actually program with) Lisp first.

1980's I programed BASIC with z90 ASSEMBLY, so now you know that I am brain damaged, but maybe learning about LISP protected me little.

Pascal I have maybe used most, but now I am spoiled with Pythons easy and simplicity.

They're used for every kind of thing. Or to be precise, Lisp is used for every kind of thing (except bootloaders, hahaha), and Python is used for every kind of thing that doesn't need to use much of the CPU.

Lisp (and Python) are concidered 4GL languages.
In that sense they are used where one needs more « freedom » in code development.
As an example, lisp code can create it's own instructions in a regular variable and then execute that code so one can create a program that « programs itself »

My favourite "working" language has to be Python, even though I am relatively new to it. I spent the last ten years before retirement writing glue code in vbScript - mostly pumping data, reformatting data, fetching and storing data, system maintenance and SQL maintenance. All of which would have been immensely easier had I used Python.

Having said that, my favourite geek language is APL. Awesome language but it is impossible to read code that you wrote more than a week ago.

For starters, mine is C#, closely followed by VB.NET

I have programmed in Assembler, RPGII, COBOL, DACL, Paradox, Magic v5.7 to v8.3, which evolved to eDeveloper, which has evolved to UniPaas v1.9.
Favorite, by far, is the Magic platform.

8-bit assembly is extremely fun. C is also really fun also. C++ isn't as fun (just structuring your objects and letting the compiler do almost everything).

Back in the day I played around with HyperScript for Macintosh. That was fun too, even though it was extremely limited.

I guess the more limited the language, the more fun it is.

With that said, English is fun. So limited...

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