First of all i hope i am posting this in the right place.

Anyway, i have recently purchased a copy of sam's teach yourself c++ in 21 days (fourth edition.) and have realy gotten stuck into it with the dream of being able to create some cool programs. i want to make actual physical programs with interfaces and stuff, and all i have gotten from the book so far are console applications that are basicly making programs with variables and printing to the screen those variables, and constants.. and incrementing them. I am up to the 6th day of the book and so i took a little glance at whats to come.. what i will actually learn on the 21st day. and all i can see is more working out of math equasion type stuff. lol.

Does this link in with actually making a nice program the has buttons and stuff that you can actually use? Like a windows application?

I dont know weather i gave enough information on what i am looking for but from what ive said, do you think this is the right book for me???

Does this link in with actually making a nice program the has buttons and stuff that you can actually use? Like a windows application?

Probably not. Any decent book about the C or C++ language shouldn't. Graphics and other API stuff for use with the core language should probably be learned after you learn the core language.

[edit]If you want a WinAPI book, google for Petzold.

Oh i see.. thankyou very much. I will push on through the book then and learn the core language..

Look at this way, it's like learning to read. First you read each character, then each word, then perhaps an entire sentence. If you want to do GUI (the windows and button thingy) programming with C++, you got to be able catch entire paragraphs at a glance, or the amount of code will drown you. Good luck with your programming progress!

There are some tiny C++ GUI code snippets to look at like
http://www.daniweb.com/code/snippet96.html

From what I know, if your looking to do full blown windows programs you probably wanna look into the Visual .NET framework. Thats what my C++ book said. Let me quote it:

"Dev-C++ (the particular complier i'm using and one of the more popular ones) does generate Windows-compatiable 32-bit programs, but it does not easily support creating programs that have the classic Windows look. If you want to do taht, you'll have to break open the wallet and go for a commercial package like Visual Studio.NET. Having said taht, I strongly recommend that you work through the examples in this book first and learn C++ before you tackle Windows developement. They are two separate things and (for the sake of sanity) should remain so in your mind"

What I got out of it: C++ is an important stepping stone towards learning how to make "Classic Windows" programs. I think the other more experienced people would tell you the same. But I don't no for sure. I too am just starting to learn.

Look at this way, it's like learning to read. First you read each character, then each word, then perhaps an entire sentence. If you want to do GUI (the windows and button thingy) programming with C++, you got to be able catch entire paragraphs at a glance, or the amount of code will drown you. Good luck with your programming progress!

There are some tiny C++ GUI code snippets to look at like
http://www.daniweb.com/code/snippet96.html

Thanks alot, loved the way you know what i want when i say button thingy.. lol.

and thaknyou also to kob... once i work completely through this book.. i prolly will crack open the wallet (or my mums wallet, because she said she'll buy anything programming related that i need :D) and buy visual studio.NET

Are there any real big things to learn off that i might be able to use in addition to my book? lol, by things i meen anything i can learn from.

thanks again

Don't thank me, thank C++ for DUMMIES. I love those books. If you wanna get a book for Visual Studio.NET I'd highly recommend looking to see if they have a "for dummies book" for it. I like their books for a couple of reasons. First of all, they have a really informal approach to the whole learning process. Its like they're right there with you and makeing little side comments and what not. I think it eases the whole learning process. Second of all, they really segment the books well. If you already know how to do something, you can just skip that section or if you don't wanna learn about a particular subject you can just completly skip around the books. If they do use something from a previous chapter they make sure you know it. Example: We're going to take a closer look at pointer variable (which I introduced in chapter 8.) I think the books are great. Thats my two cents.

Maybe better would be to take a look at the list of books Dave Sinkula has made:

With regard to C++ books, I'll just echo the advice here.


The following books are recommended; read them in mostly the order listed.
"Accelerated C++" Andrew Koenig & Barbara Moo
"The C++ Standard Library" Nicolai Josuttis --- a "must have"
"Effective C++", "More Effective C++", "Effective STL" Scott Meyers
"Exceptional C++", "More Exceptional C++" Herb Sutter
"The C++ Programming Language" 3rd edition or later Bjarne Stroustrup
"Modern C++ Design" Andrei Alexandrescu
"C++ Templates" Vandevoorde & Josuttis
"Standard C++ IOStreams and Locales" Langer & Kreft

Link towards Dave's thread with direct links to Amazon can be found here: Dave's List (Click Here)

Hey bryce,

I am also new to programmimng, and have realized that you need to start from the beginning like vegaseat says. I have been reading C++ Demystified by jeff Kent. I aquired it through Amazon.com used and like new section for a fraction of the suggested price.
It is very explanitory like the "For Dummies Books" ( Which I also Have). I also thought I was going to start making Windows Programs, but after I started researching I found that starting out one step at a time would be best. Number one is all the acronyms invovled with programming Like GUI and DLL and such is a systematic learning process. I think after some time of just learning the syntax and the way to manipulate the Functions it will be much easier to intigrate the code into the windows stuff. I also have the Keystone series of Visual C++ CD's. I have set those aside for now until I am more profficient with just coding. Just my 2 cents worth. Any of the veteran programmers here can correct me if I'm wrong :)

Bandm

thanks for the reasources guys.. you can expect to see me back here after some time. who knows, maby i will have mastered c++ when i come back:D

Thanks alot, loved the way you know what i want when i say button thingy.. lol.

and thaknyou also to kob... once i work completely through this book.. i prolly will crack open the wallet (or my mums wallet, because she said she'll buy anything programming related that i need :D) and buy visual studio.NET

....

This is a continuation of my "Look at it this way" series.

Let's first find out if you like programming, it's sort of like learning a musical instrument. If you start out with C++ and want your mum to fork over big bucks for Visual Studio.NET, it's like saying I want to learn how to play the piano, so mum buy me a grand piano. Maybe you want to start out with something more humble and less formal like a guitar.

There are computer languages much more friendly to the beginner than C++. One language I like for its simplicity and power is Python. It is fun from the start, and when you discover you like programming, switch to C++ (the grand piano). There will be much you are already familiar with from your Python (the guitar) experience.

Be my guest and take a look at the DaniWeb Python sub-forum, there is a sticky there called "Starting Python". No, this is not part of a shameless self-promotion. I am at home with both languages.

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