Hi...I am thinking of building a Word Processor in Java for my project...

The problem is that there are many components in Java for that..like JTextComponent, JTextField, JTextArea, JTextPane, JEditorPane, and some styled Documents too...

Can anyone say me which one to use considering the fact that My Project should implement most of the Word Processing Features.....

JEditorPane is the main component you'll be needing though.

(and the decompile advice is just a bit of sarcasm)

In truth, however, this is one of those cases where the old adage "if you need to ask, you probably shouldn't be doing it" applies though. As, when you have to ask this question, it means that you will be in way over your head in that project.

Comments
QFT indeed.

Please have a look at the post for your reference. In this project a statistics has been made on the words in a text file.

Can anyone say me which one to use considering the fact that My Project should implement most of the Word Processing Features.....

That's an AWFUL lot of features. Think of all of them: Let the user specify fonts, embed all sorts of graphics in the document, save in all sorts of formats, print, do landscape versus portrait, headers, footers, search/replace, spell-check, etc. etc. etc. The list goes on and on and on.

If this is a project for a college semester-long introductory Java course, I doubt your professor expects anything this ambitious.

So figure out a SHORT list of options that you can implement in a reasonable amount of time. It can be as easy or as complex as you want, and if you look at Word Processors like Microsoft Word, that's awfully complex. If you are looking at something like Microsoft Notepad, that's more reasonable, but still a lot of hours of work.

  • Figure out how much time you have to devote to this.
  • Figure out your current skill level.
  • From there, figure out the features to implement.
  • After all that's done, decide whether JTextArea, etc. is the proper class for the particular task. You figure out the task first, then pick the tools, not vice-versa.
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