Hi,

I'm looking for a book on C++...now before you flame me I did read the sticky "Read Me:C++ Books" and found the list interesting but for me uninformative...Why? I'm not really sure what C++ level I'm at currently. Let me elaborate...Here's my experience with the C family of languages..

I've been programming daily in the C language for about two years now, so I'm comfortable with the language but C++?? Well I did read/work through Sams 'Teach Yourself C++ in 21 Days' and have been picking at the language(C++) on again and off again for some time now but feel I need a book to take me to the next level(past beginner)..Do you know of one that doesn't spend too much time on the basics but has a nice continuity(beginner to intermediate...leaning more to intermediate) to it? Many thanks Gerard4143

Are you looking for the C++ book to learn industry level skills.
Then the answer is you can't.


These days I'm participating my first days with my client , and he needs everything
professionally.I think that I already got enough bookish skills/knowledge in C++
enough that I needed. But I did fail with my client, I prove myself even I don't
know how to do a code review in a efficient way.I don't think that on job experience
can be obtained through the books.
There are many things to learn,such as how to work with a large codebase, traditions
of working with CMS tools,coding styles communication with other team members etc.

but a good site to get that experience (but nothing like on job experience).
http://www.codinghorror.com/

Believe me working with a real client is really hard, I think it will be easy
after the practice.

Edited 6 Years Ago by NicAx64: n/a

I'm biased, of course; but I think that Accelerated C++ is pretty close to what you're looking for; it definitely has a tutorial narrative, so it's intended to be read sequentially (unlike many that are essentially reference books) and it covers quite a bit more material than most introductory books.

I recommend you to use universities tutorials, you can find them in OpenCourseWare web-sites of universities. For the begineers it's quick and fun.
After understanding some terms and little code parts (like includes 3 or 4 iterations programs), you could use what I used when I was begining of C++ journey.

Thinking in C++ Volume 1 - Introduction to Standard C++
Thinking in C++ Volume 2 - Practical Programming
After these two books you will able to decide what will you do? and Which why will you carry on?

I'm biased, of course; but I think that Accelerated C++ is pretty close to what you're looking for; it definitely has a tutorial narrative, so it's intended to be read sequentially (unlike many that are essentially reference books) and it covers quite a bit more material than most introductory books.

Just to verify - You mean

Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example by Andrew Koenig, Barbara E. Moo

I'm biased, of course; but I think that Accelerated C++ is pretty close to what you're looking for; it definitely has a tutorial narrative, so it's intended to be read sequentially (unlike many that are essentially reference books) and it covers quite a bit more material than most introductory books.

I just got the biased part arkoenig

Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example by Andrew Koenig, Barbara E. Moo

Any relation?

Note I ordered the book this morning...

Hi,
For C++ Refer the Book Object oriented programming With C++
written by E. BAlaGuru Swamy . I found this the best book.

other wise try some online tutorials to clear your <<plug removed>>

Thanks
Kolla Sanjeeva Rao

Edited 6 Years Ago by Nick Evan: spelling mistake

I just got the biased part arkoenig

Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example by Andrew Koenig, Barbara E. Moo

Any relation?

Note I ordered the book this morning...

Thanks!

Don't let the relatively small size fool you -- Barbara and I packed a lot more information into this book than you will find in other books three times its size.

The downside of this strategy is that you have to read it carefully; you can't just skim.
Still, I think it's better to take the time to understand 350 pages than to bleep over 2/3 of 1,000 pages.

Thanks!

Don't let the relatively small size fool you -- Barbara and I packed a lot more information into this book than you will find in other books three times its size.

The downside of this strategy is that you have to read it carefully; you can't just skim.
Still, I think it's better to take the time to understand 350 pages than to bleep over 2/3 of 1,000 pages.

No worries, I'm a thorough reader...I read a chapter once to get a feel for the subject and then read it again for detail and then test my new skills with written code..I really look forward to reading your(well you and Barbara's) book...It has tremendous reviews on amazon.

Edited 6 Years Ago by gerard4143: n/a

1. The C++ Programming Language by Bjarne Stroustrup
2. Effective C++ by Scott Meyers
3. Design Patterns by Erich Gamma, Richard Helm, Ralph Johnson, and John Vlissides
4. International Standard for C++
5. Modern C++ Design by Andrei Alexandrescu

Edited 6 Years Ago by Dani: Plug snipped

Also look into D. S. Malik's books on C++. The local tech college used his "C++ Programming: From Problem Analysis to Program Design" for the C++ classes I took (which were labeled as intro and advanced object-oriented programming). I believe he has written others as well.

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