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So what is the deal with int and INT, or float and FLOAT, or unsigned int and UINT.

Whats the reason for this, and is there any difference in using one or the other? Thanks

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Last Post by firstPerson
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Those are defined in the windows.h header and they are set that way for consistency since every data-type they have defined is in all capitals.

They have other ones like BYTE for char and a whole bunch more.

Just look up windows typedefs and you should find lots.

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They are just typedefs probably.

typedef int INT;
typedef float FLOAT;

so INT and int are the same and FLOAT and float are the same. Its just a different way to tell the compiler the data type.

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